America Today - Tupelo Chain Sex - Spot The Difference (Vinyl, LP)

Christmas Carols: America Today - Tupelo Chain Sex - Spot The Difference (Vinyl Reference Guide. New York: Garland Publishing, Inc. The Christmas Carol Reader. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press, Christmas Songs 37 Studwell, William E. Whitburn, Joel.

By Jeff Pike. Boston: Faber and Faber, Seattle freclance writer Jeff Pike presents a dark vision of the rock era. What a downer! This book should not be read by anyone suffering from either mild depression or a personality disorder. Yet it is fraught with serious Haws in both structure and This chapter by B. Casual music fans and serious biographical researchers alike are going to be puzzled when trying to locate Jesse Belvin p. No index is provided. This also negates the pursuit of cross-references.

Similarly questionable is why James Dean is included while Marilyn Monroe is not listed. Nite, Donald Clarke, and a few other reference guide compilers in the LP) section, but neglects to provide any bibliography of studies dealing specifically with death themes in rock music.

These structural incongruities severely weaken the book. Music is actually the lifeblood of the rock era. Even long-dead heroes—Jackie Wilson, Elvis Presley, John Lennon, Buddy Holly, and Jim Morrison—continue to yield hit after hit and to reign supreme on oldies-but-goodies airwaves, in reissued CDs, and on motion picture soundtracks. Jeff Pike obviously prefers obituary writing to marketing analysis. This robs his work of any real insight into the meaning and impact of recorded death themes throughout the fortyyear rock era.

Without paying much attention to the lyrical commentaries on death and dying featured on so many post recordings, Pike unwittingly ignores the pluralism of humor and horror that constitute the legacy of coffin tunes. These three songs are more than just lyrical retrospectives.

They assess the psychological impact of death upon entire generations. Death 41 The death theme is omnipresent in rock lyrics. Several scholars who have investigated this topic have elected to focus on the narrow topic of teenage coffin songs.

Serge Denisoff, a particularly perceptive popular music analyst, notes that the short-lived popularity of love-lost-through-death songs was due to the rapid cultural and political changes occurring during the mids. Still, the teenage coffin song did not return after However, the death theme did not disappear.

In fact, it became more visible and more broadly explored in popular lyrics after There were also many songs about death and dying that were not simply teenage laments that were popular throughout the s. These tunes explored more than just dejected drownings or accidental auto tragedies. What is more interesting, though, is the fact that the death theme appears in such a broad variety of visages over the past forty years. As noted earlier, there are also a few epic hero songs that use either assassinations or accidental deaths of prominent LP) or musical figures as backdrops for generation-defining commentaries.

There is considerable discussion about aging in contemporary songs. From the tender side of thirty, Pete Townshend of The Who proclaimed that he hoped he would die before he grew old. Train wreck sagas about the brave engineer Casey Jones are legion in folk music.

So are songs about John Henry. Within the popular song arena, automobile accidents and airline crashes are events that cause unexpected loss of life. In addition to the previously cited car death songs by Mark Dinning and Ray Peterson, the foremost examples of four-wheel disasters are J.

It is usually a complete surprise, a bitter shock. In sharp contrast to solitary, debilitating deaths, the passing of figures that are larger than life—whether heroes or villains— is always noteworthy. Heroes die, too. Murder and mayhem seem miles away from teenage coffin songs. Yet homicide is a common feature in popular tunes throughout the past forty years. Yet even more cold-blooded characters have found vinyl immortality since But American society has reserved the most deliberate death-dealing activity for its young men.

War is organized homicide. Gone to graveyards every one. Although Terry Nelson and C. What is it good for? Absolutely nothing! Most often, an act of suicide is described by a forlorn lover, by a remaining relative, or by a sad, confused friend.

Although John Lennon and Elvis Presley have been praised on vinyl in every imaginable fashion, no single popular music artist has yet garnered a more well-crafted, skillfully performed, and positively received recorded eulogy than Buddy Holly. As in most epic tales, there are references to a broad spectrum of historical characters. In this case, nearly all are musicians. Paul Simon, master songsmith, perceptive social analyst, and self-proclaimed child of the rock generation, seized the same historic scope as Don McLean to comment on death as a shaper of social psyche.

No details of the New York City murder are mentioned. The singer adjourns to a bar, pumps coins into a jukebox, and dedicates each song played to the late great Johnny Ace. The cycle of death is universal. It is complete from Ace to Lennon. It should be clear that while Jeff Pike feels that the passing of rock era artists somehow marks the end of rock music, it is the music itself that sustains the era, defines death images, and even provides immortality to a small group of performers.

Check CD sales. Even Frank Zappa grins from the grave via reissued recordings. Voices are no longer stilled by death. Carol Williams. Thomas Inge. Chicago: Chicago Review Press,pp. Baucom, John Q. Bird, Donald Allport, Stephen C. Holder, and Diane Sears. Booth, Stanley. Burns, Gary. Cohen, Norm. Colman, Stuart. Poole, Dorset, England: Blandford Press, Cott, Jonathan and Christine Doudna eds. The Ballad o f John and Yoko.

Denisoff, R. Dickinson, George E. Leming, and Alan C. Merman eds. Dying, Death, and Bereavement Second Edition. Duncan, Robert. Evans, Mike and Chet Flippo. Fogo, Fred. Fox, Aaron A. Fuller, John G.

Are the Kids A ll Right? New York: Times Books, Death 63 Goddo, Teresa. Grendysa, Peter. Griggs, Bill. Harrell, Jack. Harris, James F. Hibbard, Don J. Hoffman, Paul Dennis. Jackson, Laura. London: Smith Gryphon, Jacobs, Philip. Rock V Roll Heaven. London: Apple Press, Katz, Gary.

Secaucus, NJ: Citadel Press, Kinder, Bob. Chicago: Adams Press,pp. Kraft, Curt. Kiibler-Ross, Elisabeth. Death: The Final Stage o f Growth. On Death and Dying. Langer, Lawrence. Boston: Beacon Press, State Journal January 20,p.

Lax, Roger and Frederick Smith. New York: Oxford University Press, Lipsitz, George. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, Loud, Lance. Lyle, Katie Letcher. Marcus, Greil. McDonald, James R. McLaurin, Melton A. Philadelphia, PA: Gordon and Breach, Murdoch, Brian. London: Routledge Publishing, Ltd. Newlin, Jon.

Niemi, Robert. Nolan, Alan. New York: Pharos Books, Porterfield, Nolan. Westport, CT: Greenwood Presspp. Reeve, Andru J. Rodnitzky, Jerome L. Rogers, Jimmie N. The Country Music Message: Revisited.

Roman, Shari. Roos, Michael. Rose, Cynthia. Ruitenbeek, H. Death: Interpretations. Sammon, Paul M. New York: Delta Books, Death 65 Schmidt-Joos, Siegfried. Frankfurt, Germany: Ulistein Press, Somma, Robert ed.

New York: Outerbridge and Dienstfrey, Spencer, Jon Michael. Blues and Evil. Stecheson, Anthony and Anne Stecheson comps. The Stecheson Classified Song Directory. Indianapolis, IN: L. Stidom,pp. Stillion, Judith M. Washington, DC: Hemisphere Press, Tamarkin, Jeff. Taylor, Rogan. The Death and Resurrection Show. London: Alond Press, Ltd.

Thomson, Elizabeth and David Gutman eds. New York: Macmillan Books, Thrush, John C. Tosches, Nick. New York: Harmony Books, Tunnell, Kenneth D. Von Nordheim, DeLoris. Walser, Robert. West, John Foster. Wiley, Mason. John Henry: A Bio-Bibliography. Wilson, Charles Reagan. McLaurin and Richard A.

Philadelphia, PA: Gordon and Breach,pp. Chapter 4 Foolish Behavior The fool theme is frequently explored in song lyrics. Personal analysis is pervasive. Self-referencing lyrics allow wayward voyagers on the seas of love to define their own personal dilemmas, to explain the complexity of romantic circumstances to others, or to lament situations in which cool rationality failed when hot emotion erupted.

The fool in a romantic situation is the moral equivalent of Everyman or Everywoman. The charm, satisfaction, and hubris of absolute trust, veneration, and pure love make fools of everyone. The human condition is invariably one of randomly demonstrated flaws rather than consistent perfection.

The courtship scenario manifests absolute adulation that defies reason, reflection, assessment, and objectivity. Fool songs usually argue on behalf of retrospective balance. They are sources of self-learning. When shared as popular lyrics, they urge listeners to heed the transitory nature of all human relationships.

The fool concept is vague. The term is so prevalent in song titles and lyrics that its use defies conventional definition. There is seldom a gender-specific issue. Nor is the fool song limited by musical genre. Whether falling for an irresistibly beautiful or handsome creature who is utterly unattainable This chapter by B. Sleeman, and The Westwood Press. Sometimes foolish behavior is viewed by an external observer with a cooler, more distant perspective.

The fool then becomes the object of pity, ridicule, or humiliation. This question constitutes the rationale for this investigation. If fool status is indeed a universal experience, then what particular circumstances spark the realization for a victim of foolhardiness or for an observer of foolish actions?

The fool trope, so ubiquitous in popular lyrics, is depicted and defined in a series of situations. Stories from blues ballads and country laments translate readily into all forms of popular recordings. Yet certain attitudes and behaviors accumulate toward a general characterization. Fools manifest lack of common sense and sound judgment. They tend to disregard predictable consequences of their behaviors while articulating only desired though unrealistic ends.

Fools exercise limited self-control while being tricked, cheated, or manipulated by others. In popular songs, a fool and his money can be readily parted. Big A! Love is too potent an elixir for most humans. This is not a contagious disease; nor is it fatal.

But it generates an emotional bashing that often leaves the fool loveless and friendless, though seldom speechless. In fact, a vast number of fool songs are soliloquies about personal flaws. Fools can learn. Fools can also teach. But fools cannot save either themselves or others from future bouts with romance or heartache. The degree of attachment felt by one person for another is the basis for either a romantic interlude or heartbreak. Yet misperception and misunderstanding are common to the human condition.

No simple equation can define the mutual magnitude of love between two independent beings. For instance, repeating the magic three words may be either a heartfelt pledge or an ornamental greeting. While many advice songs allude to the issue of misunderstanding, the situation being described is usually based upon painful hindsight.

A broken-hearted lover recalls the warnings of well-intentioned friends that were blithely ignored as a romance flourished, then floundered. Self-realization can be a prominent point of recognition, although it usually arrives only after the period of foolishness. This is common in popular lyrics. There is a peculiar irony in this circumstance since during most courtships there are promises of selflessness that bode well for future compromises.

However, dominance is a corrupting factor that undermines trust, respect, and concern. The fool image is generally self-identified in these circumstances. The power to sustain the romantic relationship is conceded to the partner with pleas for either improved behavior or blessed release. The singer adopts a helpless role. It does not guarantee ultimate wisdom though. They invariably wish to share their tales. Such lyrical pedagogy is often preachy and usually ineffective.

The about-to-become-a-fool listener is pursuing passion. This state of euphoria is least receptive to the pontification of a used-to-be fool. Others are more specific. However, singers and songwriters are not adverse to applying the fool label to situations unrelated to courtship.

It is a nonclinical, nonhistorical term. It is a self-diagnosis of situational recognition. Pathos and humor meet. It is serious though. Remediation is available, but not necessarily pleasant nor permanent.

Within the lyrics of songs, it constitutes a popular culture formula that exudes empathy no matter how often it is repeated. The nature of romance and high emotional involvements foreordain the slippery slope of irrational behavior.

The learning curve is unpredictable in each case. First, rhyme scheme favors a brief and readily matchable word. Second, the genderless nature of the term allows both males and females to self-identify or to project the meaning to the opposite sex.

Third, the concept of fool makes no reference to general intelligence, professional expertise, social or economic status, age, ethnicity, religion, or physical appearance. It is a circumstance of unanticipated origin and unspecified duration. Finally, the fool can become a source of advice or an illustration to protect others from similar amorous pitfalls.

Chicago: University of Chicago Press, Lee and Wayne S. Dunne, Michael. Ferguson, Gary Lynn comp. Green, Jeff comp. Philosophy at fa R. Kawin, Bruce F. Orrin E. Rimler, Walter. Stecheson, Anthony and Anne Stecheson.

Stecheson Classified Song Directory. Foolish Behavior 87 Whitburn, Joel comp. Whitburn, Joel comp. Top Pop Singles, Willeford, William. However, the challenge of systematic categorization is too fascinating to avoid. Bonds, and others. Blues Authority— Volume Three. Blues Bureau BB John, and Art Neville. Rarely does a popular music legend have no legacy of Billboard Hot success.

Nevertheless, such was the case with Dallas-born blues giant Stevie Ray Vaughan. Far less successful, though, was the release of a live Austin performance of April 1, vintage under the quasi-biblical title In the Beginning Recent tributes to the performing genius of Stevie Ray Vaughan have pursued three distinct formats. The only reasonable fan complaint would be.

A Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan constitutes an authentic all-star salute to the man and his music. Jimmie also added Bonnie Raitt, Dr. John, and Art Neville, plus Double Trouble, to complete the distinguished tribute band.

For most deceased artists, it is reasonable to engage a number of current stars performing a montage of hit recordings. This is not the case for Stevie Ray Vaughan, though. His sound, his energy, and his distinctive style defies replication. Greatest Hits is ideal. Hats O ff to Stevie Ray is a poor copy.

Many other popular songs challenge the morality of business leaders. Thus, most songs portray the world of work from the vantage point of the employee. In contrast to the numerous victims of the economic system, a few individuals challenge and defeat the materialistic world. This does not necessarily mean that they gain success, fame, and wealth though. But Lou Rawls outdoes both Albert Hammond and Linda Ronstadt in making his case against mindless, meaningless employment.

A cornerstone of individual development in American society is the expectation of personal success. So can frustration. But here is also risk to setting high goals; the reality of failure is the flipside of success. Not all dreams come true. Jobs that once appeared to be brief, exciting employment steps on an occupational ladder toward financial self-sufficiency can become boring, dead-end emotional traps. Persistence alone may not be sufficient to keep an individual at the top of his or her field forever.

What then? There is no quantitative way to measure the value of character against the goal of mobility. Although sociologists and psychologists may draw fine distinctions between occupations and vocations or between jobs and professions, few clear work-related boundaries arc found in popular lyrics. Human labor is rarely viewed as ennobling. In fact, work is generally depicted as drudgery performed out of inescapable financial necessity. Craftsmanship and the concern for high-quality on-the-job performance is rarely mentioned.

The variety of occupations mentioned in popular songs is staggering. Not unexpectedly, movie stars and popular music personalities are focal points for job interests. Who could refute their claim? The majority of contemporary lyrics are critical of material ends that emphasize the cost of everything while finding lasting value in nothing. Other criticisms locus on the problems of remaining emotionally sensitive to others while living in a materialistic society.

These commentaries are often symbolic in tone. Attacks on the immorality or lost innocence of dollar-sceking individuals also illustrates the antimaterialism theme.

Bobby Smith combines staccato audio images of being stuck in traffic, of facing a screaming boss, of getting a headache, and of being indicted on his job for doing everything wrong.

Continuing job frustration is even more difficult to resolve than the understandable longing for a regular weekend break. Bobby Bare views his assembly line job as crushing monotony. Work without sufficient time for human pleasure, leisure, and social amenities is truly drudgery. This is particularly true if the boss can control his own life and leisure at the expense of his workers.

Even the frustration of repetitive steel production is preferable to stagnating unemployment brought on by poor planning, inadequate schooling, misleading national myths, and industrial pullouts.

As the factories close, former workers simply kill time by standing in lines and filling out unemployment forms. Next, he shifts his commentary to the upward mobility desired by Americans who participated in World War II.

The real target in this lyrical diatribe of lost dreams and found hypocrisy is the American social and economic system as misrepresented by public school educators. They omitted what was real: iron and coke, chromium steel. The song concludes with a statement mixing dream and reality.

Poverty results from a variety of circumstances. Sometimes lack of interest in contributing to the family income, failure to follow the work ethic, or just individual laziness, ignorance, or nonmotivation render people financially poor.

Ray Charles is frequently a spokesman for the poor, but his messages arc often delivered with humor in his lyric and a twinkle in his tone. Too often it is forgotten that poverty is generally a problem that exceeds individual ability to explain or to overcome. Contemporary lyrics address these issues. There is a force at work in the ghetto, however, that seems to undermine efforts to escape. It is understandable that the frustration of living in a closed social system, in an unforgiving, harsh economic environment could spark strong responses for independence.

One such reaction is criminal activity. Unemployment is often the result of an accumulating process of job dissatisfaction. An individual may be earning a deccnt wage but still be upset with his or her day-to-day workplace. Hatred of the boss, feelings of anonymity in the hourly operation of a plant, disagreements with fellow workers, and other job-related problems may create an unhappy employee.

The action of being released from even an unwanted work position is embarrassing and frustrating. The natural man works only for the convenience of an income and reserves his personal life for his ultimate enjoyment. Black, Sharon. Butchart, Ronald E. Cantor, Louis. Cohen, Norm with music edited by David Cohen. Littleton, CO: Libraries Unlimited, Lee and Donald E. Walker with assistance from William L. Dannen, Frederic. Hit Men Updated Edition. New York: Vintage Books, Serge with the assistance of William L.

Haas used to be the bassist in Ange, while Hasselman played with Travelling. The line-up of the first LP was Haas on various guitars and bass, Hasselmann on piano, Fender Rhodes and Korg synth while Christian Repiquet played drums and percussion and J-Louis Baverel contributed electric and 12 string guitars.

So that makes this probably the most enjoyable Ange related release for me, so far. The music is a great blend of melodic symphonic play. Next to that there is a certain folky flair on the disc too. LP German Christian symphonic progressive rock. This CD sold very well, especially in Germany and the United States, so the first release was quickly out of print. Their sound had folky and psychedelic influences. CD, The first track is a home recording on keyboards, it sounds rather boring and even has some false rings, not a very tactical opener!

But gradually, Habitat starts to convince us with nice and warm tracks containing those typical melancholic Latin-American vocals. My favorites: celestial keyboards in "Horizonte gris", beautiful piano and a surprising bag-pipe sound in "Epopeya", great keyboards and a sensitive electric guitar solo in "Luz de vida" and a captivating climate with bombastic keyboards, propulsive drums and a howling electric guitar solo with volumepedal in "El canto de las carbezas reducidas" a song from A fine album if you don t mind the melancholic Spanish vocals.

InJackson teamed up with Lothar Meid for the short-lived Tambarin-project. They started together in The Quiet World and also afterwards John would often record with his brother. The CD featured musicians like Nick Magnus on the keyboards and the drums, Steve Hackett on guitar and harmonica, while most of the lyrics had been written by Nick Clabburn, long time company with Genesis, and several tracks featured Regenesis vocalist Tony Patterson.

His music is very melodic, shows a lot of different moods but is definitely very appealing to me. Every track has this intriguing melancholy and nostalgia making you long for more. CD Steve Hackett is definitely one of the best-known and most influential guitarists with the progressive rock genre.

He was born on 12 February in Londen as the son to a painter, while his mother worked in advertisments. His first adventures in music were with a harmonica, but upon hearing The Shadows play when he was 14 years, Steve decided to start playing the guitar. This is also the first piece to contain proper vocals. One for the more introspective moments of life. A shame, this could have been better. But, as said, for a live album there are better choices with better sound and playing.

I like blues rock, so reason not to like a blues album if Steve Hackett does one - although the idea that he would do one sounds off, even almost 15 years after the fact. But regrettably I must admit that I found the disc slightly disappointing.

And so I could comment other songs as well. The versions are okay, but with a massed talent like this I expect much more. Beautiful Mellotron sounds can be heard on almost every album by Steve; this time we hear the instrument on the track "This world".

The koto and the optigan are instruments which he used in the old days and for this new album he touched them again. There is no instrumental on the album. Steve sings together with Terry and Gregory and it is rather strong done. When you read that a lot of different styles are used, you might think that Steve made a very strange album, but this is not the case; all styles are falling together as pieces of a puzzle.

You can hear that he did a lot of work to bring all those pieces of music together in one strong format. I must warn every fan of Steve Hackett who wants to buy this record: I truly believe that not everybody might like the music. It is advised to listen first before buying. At the time rather new songs such as "In the heart of the city" and "Theatre of sleep". Two Genesis tunes which are in his repertoire for ages were also recorded: "Horizons" and "In that quiet earth".

The weirdest track that we can see was called "Jazz jam". It is indeed a jazz jam which starts with real old fashioned jazz and ends with real modern jazz rock. Steve s voice was in perfect shape during this concert and also his guitar synth solo on "In the heart of the city" was pretty incredible. It only shows that Steve s guitar playing still remains out of this world during all those years.

Also, there are a couple of classical Eric Satie compositions, representing his album with Satie pieces. It all marks a very complete set of songs and a showcase for acoustic guitar in general. Needless to say that this is a set every Hackett follower should own, while it will be also interesting for lovers of acoustic guitar playing in general. This recording is highly recommended.

But what the hack this is really awesome and it contains only great versions of songs from Steve s solo albums and old Genesis stuff. Camino did a great job by releasing this wonderful live album.

Reading the tracks on this 2CD it becomes clear that all songs played during this tour can be found on this fantastic live album. Yes, the album again is fantastic. After the NEARfest live CD we again have a live recording which is recommended to all fans of this incredible guitar player.

The band did some of the songs in a more jazzy style, which I certainly found refreshing to hear. The same versions can be found on this album. The band played very strong in front of a very cheerful audience. On this second part of the tour we can hear more material from his latest album. Not just the familiar songs such as "Mechanical bride", "Serpentine song" and "Brand new", but also songs such as "Circus of becoming" and "Frozen statues" are performed.

He even played a couple of new tunes as he always does during a live tour. We can hear a new intro followed by the Arabian sounding "Valley of the kings". This time some real old classic tracks can be heard that were not on the previous "Archive" albums.

Even some new Genesis songs are included: a full length version of "Blood on the rooftops" and "Fly on a windshield". And what would a Hackett live album be without "Every day", "Spectral mornings" or "Firth of fifth". The songs are the same as on the 2CD. This time, however, you can actually see what everybody is doing on stage. We get great close ups of all the five musicians.

For example you can see at close range who did the lead vocals on "Blood on the rooftops" drummer Gary O Toole. His drum parts during "Los endos" are also excellent. If Genesis ever decides to tour again Gary is probably ready to take the job of the extra live drummer. For those people who can t get enough by watching only the entire concert, an extra bonus is featured.

On "Backstage In Budapest" we see the band arrive and get ready for the concert. Images of the sound check and at the hotel are nice to watch but are nothing more than something extra. Be aware that this music has no rock elements, only classical! There are some exquisite melodies and we all ready knew Steve is still an astonishing guitarist!

A delicate album that ventures more into classical waters that into prog. Real weak spots are not to be found. Spock and Mr. But fear not! The music draws from the melodic South American neo prog tradition with Portuguese lyrics. Roughly half of the tracks are instrumentals. Traces of Floyd and Camel and some jazzy and Latin touches come along. The main criticism would perhaps be that the keyboards sound a bit thin and cheap on some parts. One drawback however: the drums are programmed, but I can live with them.

I think that the first part, showing more variation, is a bit stronger than the last part of the CD, which tends to be a bit more keyboard-orientated and softer. Nevertheless, a fine album. Instead we get fine melodic, kind of soft symphonic progressive rock of the Latin American kind.

The vocals are fine in Portuguese and English which is a first as far as I recall. The instrumentals on this CD, by the way, may be counted among their best work until now, so if you liked anything from Haddad before this is a safe choice. Per Nilsson, a well-known Swedish guitarist joined, as well as singer Michael Ohlsson and drummer Patrick Jansson, but best known band member was Hans Lundin, one of the leaders of Swedish prog legend Kaipa in the s and early s.

Hagen made one CD after all members went their own ways. Nilsson went to metal act Scar Symmetry but later teamed up with Lundin again in a reformed version of Kaipa. What a great album this is! Real Swedish folk with heavy guitar riffs. There is no need however to get into details. Each song is great. The keyboard sound and solos reminded me of Manfred Mann.

The folk melodies are great, the arrangements are very good and the riffs and guitar playing are superb. The only minor point of criticism I have is the singer. This can be heard on their first demo, but afterwards they changed their style to incorporate classical, folk and symphonic elements. Another demo followed and the the band recorded its debu album that was received very well and marked their breakthrough.

Also the third studio album was a concept, this time about Italian scientist Galileo Galilei. The title was the quote attributed to Galileo.

CD Collaboration of German musician Georg Hahn, who composed and played - together with some guest musicians the music and Wolfgang Nocke, who took care of illustrations. After a break of more than two decades, mastermind Vesa Lattunen reformed the band in the s with a couple of young musicians. Imagine Van Der Graaf Generator performing with a tex mex wind instruments especially sax player and taking Finnish folk into their music.

This might approximately what you get if you also add an expressive Finnish singer. Sure, the music is quite okay, but the surprising blend of music and the freshness seems gone. After this Hairy Chapter disappeared. Here it is indeed just plain bleus. The line-up mentioned above was taken from the album. The title of the solo CD is a slight nod towards his band work, by the way, indicating the height of the Kebnekaise mountain….

The music is sophisticated and catchy at the same time. Actually, maybe a tad better. CD A very, very surprising album. The first track sets you on the entire wrong foot because it makes you believe that we have a progmetal group here oh no, not another one… but quickly it turns out that the band is much, much more versatile. Are you still with me? Can you in fact imagine something like that? Hard to c lassify this band. They lost their vocalist in the last months of and nothing was heard of them after.

Richard Hallebeek is a jazz-rock guitarist, hailing from Groningen, The Netherlands, but born in Bilthoven, 2 August He studied at the Hilversum conservatory, where he graduated with excellent results. He played in a band called What A Gig!

His plan was to learn as much as possible in a short time, to get experiences and to meet as many people as possible. He succeeded in all of this and finally stayed ten months instead of the intended six! After several weeks of studying at the GIT, Richard started playing in several bands and did sessions with other musicians.

Meanwhile Richard had formed sort of a steady band featuring a Swiss drummer, a Finnish guitarist and a German bassist. The latter had some contacts with a recordcompany. Richard discovered that an album would be more successful if some well-known name appeared on it. They cut one heavy progressive rock album with a folky touch in only released in Germany then. Au Dernier Rang! Taking that aside the music is very fine, combining symphonic prog with great work on keyboards and guitars with extensive violin play, giving the band a rather original sound.

Ollie Halsall died in from a drug overdose. They were rather successful, but after ten years they parted ways and Mara concentrated on solo work. They played at Baja prog and set on recording a new album. Unfortunately singer Jocelyn Beaulieu left the band shortly after the festival, just before they were ready to do another album after their successful debut album.

So the band rearranged their material and decided that their bass player Jean-Francois Desilets was a good choice to do the lead vocals. The second CD was another success - the complete first pressing sold out before its release! Forget The Watch and anything they did after their first album and play this instead. I love it! This new sound has traces of the old Genesis with a lot of Mellotron.

The lead vocals have elements of the way Peter Gabriel used to sing. I must admit that I really liked their rather new style of music. It is obvious that we still hear traces of the bands early album but now we also hear that they are influenced by their fellow country men Rush.

The drum and guitar parts done by the brothers Jalbert still go into this direction on several tracks. As a sort of new Tony Banks he also not only plays the B3 organ and Mellotron but also touched the 12 string acoustic guitar. Instruments which are used a lot on all of the tracks. Also his synthesizer solos are very tasteful done. The band delivered a very strong second album. The LP had Christian lyrics in German language.

During this time, he played a great variation of musical styles, like free jazz, latin music, and experimental electronic music. In he started a new music studio with Ulrich Stranz, and between and he would cooperate with people like Josef Anton Riedl multi-media projectsMorton Feldman, Luc Ferrari and Carl Orff.

Inhe founded Between with which he got quite a name and did several albums. Hamel had a great interest in oriental music and travelled to Asia several times. Since he had indulged in studies into relaxation methods and Far Eastern singing techniques and tone systems. These influences can clearly be found on his early albums with meditative and flowing music.

Besides that, he has done music America Today - Tupelo Chain Sex - Spot The Difference (Vinyl choir and orchestra. She went into music relatively early, debuting at the age of Her early work was in folk-rock direction In the early s she supported Wishbone Ash and even joined the group for a brief stint.

Quite a difference in sound from her s work which were the only albums I knew so farthis America Today - Tupelo Chain Sex - Spot The Difference (Vinyl is very much with a s sound and quite electro-pop oriented. Rather sympho-pop oriented as well and with some really good songs on the LP.

Having only read about the lady before listening to this album, I was slightly surprised. Very good with fine melodies and enough edges to keep it from becoming sweetish. He worked a lot with people like Joe Satriani and Frank Gambale.

But we have some vocal tracks, partly bordering hard rock, a couple of powerful jazz-rockers the style that Hamm suits best and also some more acoustic work. Yes, indeed, monsterfusion. Impressive instrumental display with load of chops and virtuosity while remaining the melodic edge and not loosing themselves just in showing off and noodling along.

Power fusion rules! The stress is not as much on the bass play as I expected, although there is plenty of room for Stuart to display his chops. Not bad, but I prefer it when they show some muscle. What is that all about! Later Jan became a member of Mahavishnu Orchestra. After this he had his own band and did an album with Mahavishnu colleague Jerry Goodman which also featured Jeff Beck.

Hammer played a very important role and wrote many tracks on Jeff Beck s jazz-rock albums "Wired" on which also Michael Narada Walden appears and "There And Back" A nice rocker, though. This compilation shows a nice selection of this work. The opening title track is very rock oriented with some screamy vocals in a most manic Hammill manner, but overall the album takes the direction of what he did with VDGG including a lot of busy sax.

Others can very well do without it. Peter dug out the tapes of these emotional shows and compiled two discs.

In more than two hours, Peter runs through most of the back catalogue, often giving it a different treatment to the original. From emotional heartfelt love-songs to tortured aggressive, the discs has an intimate atmosphere. Although this is not Peter s strongest outing, there are plenty of fine moments here.

Fans know what to expect. A few years after the recordings of this double LP, the band split. CD Some kind of Korea prog group. Legendary American jazz and jazz-rock keyboardist, sometimes pretty rocky, at other times very funky and danceable. The piece contains many freaky improvised, almost free jazz-like parts that will give many listeners either a hard time, or the definite creeps.

Challenging to say the least! A must have for serious progressive jazz-rock listeners. Fine fusion in the line of Headhunters with sublime electric piano. A fantastic album! Columbia CK CD, ? LP compilation Columbia CD, ? So, the majority of the album is rather accessible, almost poppy and not quite jazz-rock, but very pleasant. I would have loved to hear a full album of this music, but overall quite good, nevertheless. On this album we see Herbie travelling through various styles.

While the sound is a tad jazzier this version stays very close to the original and adds really little. So, a couple of good tracks, many interesting and some utterly uninteresting musicians, a lack of really original ideas and great artwork. Unbelievable that this remained unreleased for so many years.

Highly recommended! On his solo disc he showcases a varied repertoire between Alan Parsons-like sympho-pop the title track is a dead ringer for APPpoppy stuff, and heavier some AOR-ish leanings. Very accessible, not all too challenging and overall good fun.

LP British prog with jazz, funk and heavier influences. Interestingly they were produced by none other than ELP on whose label they also appeared.

Not to be confused with the late s US boy group! SON - -?? What I rate most highly about the disc is the mystic quality and atmosphere that many other Tolkien-inspired albums are seriously lacking. I agree. Part H - HE Version Page 15 with the linernotes that state that some of the music may help to fill in some blanks of the theme, while leaving many things open to your own interpretation. Guitar playes an important part, but there are also saxes, vocals and driving percussion.

They did a couple of demos and cassette-only releases, until Cuneiform Records signed them in During the s, Stan Whitaker was a short-time member of Ten Jinn and played live and on CD with them on a regular basis for several years as a guest. He also had his own band Spirit Noise and worked on a solo acoustic thing in the late s.

In he appeared with his band Six Elements. AR CD, ? Mainly focusing on instrumental compositions, Happy the Man could be called a US variety of Camel though with a definite jazz-rock tinge to them. Although the music is quite complex there is a serenity about it. Moving flowing pieces with flute are subdued by the more quirky tracks with odd time changes and breaks.

Fine guitar playing, smooth keys and a cunning rhythm session make these albums all time classics that should be in any self-respecting progressive music fan s collection. But the songs with vocals among which the helix thing reveal clearly that their strength lies on the instrumental part, not in the rather dull singing. AR CD, Like the above and even better!

The fusion between jazz-rock and progressive rock has been developed nearly into perfection here with most focus on the prog part, by the way. Sublime songs, mainly instrumental just one track with vocals. Highly, highly recommended. Good stuff. We have been waiting way too long for this one HTM are worse than IQ in this respectbut it was worth the wait.

Blistering and varied, mostly instrumental progressive rock. One of the poll-leading albums of this year for sure.

Top notch entertaining prog! Their second product "Crafty Hands" was released one year later in So their third studio album "The Muse Awakens" should have been released inagain one year later. Because it sounds much the same as their first two albums.

But let s look at the back of this disc. Time must have stood still all those years. Again we hear great progressive rock music in a style that only Happy The Man can play. Eventually they continued with Magnum. Interesting to hear Catley singing differently than on the Magnum work I know him from. And the female backing and lead vocals add quite a touch of their own to the music. Ne Zaman? Lacks direction and good music. But beware the music is nothing like this band although at times the bass play can be rather funky.

This may be a relief to many progheads, but - like most albums on Carbon 7 - this is not your average prog-material! Amen to that. The obvious comparison for this kind of music of course is Frank Zappa.

On the CD are many details to be discovered in each song that repeated listening is necessary to remotely grasp what s inside the music. Most structures of the pieces are rather classically influenced by the way, while the music itself doesn t sound classical at all. Their sole LP saw guest musicians Collin Heade cello and special guitarRob Metcalfe synthesizer programming and special effects and Mark Reagan snare drum and 2 nd hand cymbals.

The album was reissued on CD through Mellow Records. Nancy a. Nancy Kaye later appeared in a band called Astoria. An interesting, but slightly uneven effort. Their second LP was a rock opera about the life of a pirate.

Later Maucher rejoined Jane. But indeed it is a song about riding a motorcycle. This nearly caused me to: 1 puke, and 2 switch off the CD. After this comes a heavy prog rocker with rough singing and good guitar play. If you forget the opener a quite interesting and enjoyable disc.

Originally, Harmonia was only intended to be a live band, but they ended up spending most of the second half of recording the debut.

Through a Harmonia-gig with Brian Eno that same year, Cluster became good friends with Eno, which led to some collaborative work.

In a CD with previously unreleased recordings with Harmonia and Brian Eno was released under the moniker Harmonia Their self-titled debut was fairly folk oriented and mainly acoustic.

Harmssen plays all the instruments, especially piano. YERMA - -?? After this, he played with Tupelo Chain Sex and other groups, moved to Europe and released solo material, partly in a bluesy early progressive rock vein, others more jazz- rock or blues oriented.

But this album just smokes. His first solo album contains jazz-rock music compared to Mahavishnu Orchestra. He also did some solo-albums. SBL LP, ? Esoteric CD,remastered German cosmic electronic musician, who was raised in America, but returned to Germany in the s. After his rare and unknown debut, he disappeared from the scene again. Did also several albums with his Steeleye colleague Maddy Prior. Some songs of their albums were also later played by this band. Harth also did much solo-work, varying from RIO to free-jazz to music for theatre.

The group was of course led by drummer Keef Hartley who was born on 8 March in Preston, Lancashire. Keef Hartley died on 27 Novemberaged Raw singing, fiery guitars and plenty of horns to spice things up. For fans of proto-prog certainly a feast. Very enjoyable, but not quite the class of Colosseum. FACES - ? They were based in Barcelona where they started in He did several solo albums with styles as varied as pure soundtrack music, flute recorders oriented music and progressive rock in the Oldfield-mould.

Far away! She later did several solo albums and collaborative works with Steve Howe among others as well forming an own version of Renaissance in the late s. In the original Renaissance finally reformed - again with Annie. Regrettably, the songwriting, and also the arrangements, are here just of an average level, despite the participation of some high-class musicians.

Biglin accompanies Annie. We hear songs played on the piano or on the acoustic guitar or with backing tracks. This version played only on acoustic guitar sounds very special. Again she is accompanied by only one person who played all the instruments.

This time with the keyboard player from her own band; Rave Tesar. The last title is probably the most well known song of all. So not really songs which are expected to be sung by one of the greatest voices of progressive rock music. But they were all songs which played a large part in her musical journey from childhood to present time.

Songs which Annie used to sing with her Mum and Dad, Christmas carols which most people can sing-a-long to, with slightly different arrangements made by Rave Tesar. Again a special new song was written for the occasion.

But it was Rave who wrote the music and lyrics. According to Annie it is just a matter of time and this ballad will become a new Christmas carol which will be sung by all. Besides being part of this electronic music legend, he also participated in a band called Lightwave and did some ethnic flavoured solowork.

In the band broke up, just when they began to gain a reputation as a band. It was rumoured that Hatfield was working on a new studio album with Dave Stewart in and they also played at the Burg Herzberg festival in July of that year.

What did appear around that period were two CDs with archive recordings. And maybe that is typical for the music that brings a typical Canterbury jazz and prog blend in a very unobstrusive and unengaging way. Please Canterbury fans: forgive me and do enjoy! A fantastic set of Canterbury jazz-prog with a lot of variety and humour. But luckily, this is not the fact.

The best way to describe the album is, by using the liner notes, which compare the music to Pink Floyd, Mike Oldfield and Alan Parsons. This all presented in a splendid production and with a top-notch sound. The sound is again splendid and there are some excellent pieces of music to be found on the disc. Very enjoyable nevertheless. The music on this album was all-instrumental fusion with a strong nod towards the work of Kraan, not only because some Kraanthemes were used.

With all this in mind we insert the CD into the player and discover an album filled with mostly easy flowing - at times orientally flavored - jazzy, danceable pop music. Overall the music is rather relaxed, smooth and laid back and the mostly female vocals sometimes remind of Sade not surprising regarding the musical foundation. Heavy outbursts, breaks and solos are almost entirely absent. Quite pleasant, yet over the length of a disc a bit too much.

Musically they played the typical weird jazz-rock fusion of Guru Guru. They released only a cassette. The latter also appeared on the two long progressive tracks on side b of the second LP. The line-up mentioned above was taken from the second album. CD Instrumental jazz-rock group from Sweden in a dual guitars, bass, drums and keyboards line-up.

Proby short-time vocalist for Focus and also writer of music for television, movies and songwriter for the likes of Barbara Streisand and Olivia Newton John. On his first two solo-CDs with classical keyboard oriented music the influence of his soundtrack-writing shows a lot. But we did our best!

The debut is one of the albums I do prefer to play from then whenever I have to listen to them since it offers more variety than the heavy spacey and messy rumbling on that I experienced on their later work. We do have some links to the later space hard rock, but there are also a lot of acoustic moments at times they even remind me of The Moody Blues at their spaciest and most psychedelicwe have some cosmic and almost electronic experimentations and some general weirdness, probably comparable to stuff found on some early Pink Floyd bootlegs.

And why not with a cover that is filled with weed-leaves? Else: flush and forget! Musically influenced by, or in the line of, Black Sabbath et. Larry West, the brother of Leslie West seems to have been a member. In fact I think that this solo album is better than most of what the Moody Blues did during much of the s and certainly after the s. And also the rest of the LP contains a bunch of really good songs with interesting arrangements, occasional orchestral bits and symphonic leanings and because of additctive melodies a pleasure to listen to.

Their live recorded LP a recording of their final gig in October does not reveal the identities of the members. In the late s, the band reunited. The line-up changed a little, the drums were played by Michael Fromm now and also a guitarist, Tobias Neumann the son of flautist and singer Dieter Neumannwas added.

Thanks to this, the sound of the group became a bit heavier. In the band went into another hiatus. Brothers Chris bass, vocals and later also keys and Paul McMahon guitars and vocals are the main instigators though they had a little help from Andy Naughten on drums and Michael Powell on keyboards. Both critical assessments and laudatoryconclusions are mixed throughoutthe text.

The alphabeticaltopic format permitsread- ers to selectively perusethe text and to concentrateon particular items of interest. Extensive lists of literary resourcesand song titles within the chapters,along with a lengthy bibliography at the end of the volume, offer additional sourcesfor future inquiries by teachersand scholars.

A writer relies upon friends and professionalcolleagues forideas,assis- tance, stimulation, and criticism while pursuingscholarly production. We gratefully acknowledgethe superbbooks, articles, and conferencepapers produced by the following exceptional thinkers: Mark Booth, Ray B. Browne, Gary Burns, GeorgeO. Serge Denisoff, Howard A. Dewitt, Philip H.

Rollin, Fred E. Throughrecord collecting and correspondence concerningaudiotapes,we have also establishedbeneficial contacts with several shreWd, helpful persons: David A. Milberg, William L. Schurk, and Chas "Dr. Rock" White. Also of specialnote is the tremendoussupportand effort given by Ellen Elder with the compilation and layout of this work.

Authors also benefit from the loving, uncritical support of spouses, children, parents,and otherloved ones. This indispensablesustenance was provided by Jill E.

Cooper,Michael L. Cooper,Laura E. Cooper,Julie A. Cooper, Nicholas A. Cooper, Kathleen M. Cooper, Charles A. The final type of support that made this study possiblewas financial.

Two agenciesprovided direct economicassistance. Lee Coopera "Travel to Collections" grant during This special financial support permitted lengthy periodsof researchaccessto both literary and audio materialshousedin the SoundRecordingsArchive of the William T. Lee Cooper WayneS. While I had been a record collector sinceand had taught college-level coursesin lyric analysis sinceI did not publish my initial music article until Between andI produced ten more volumes, severalof which were co-authored,on bibliographic music re- sources,thematic imagery in songs,discographic materials,and various topics of pedagogicaland historical interest.

Most of my books were derivedfrom articlesthat haveappearedin morethanforty different schol- arly journals, popular magazines,and educationalperiodicals. My two RockMusic in AmericanPopular Culture volumes,compiledwith Wayne Haney and releasedby The Haworth Pressin andfeature a variety of essays,book reviews,recordcommentaries,and referencecom- pilations that typify my eclectic tastesin contemporarymusic.

All of my writings stem from the conviction that modern music is a particularly revealing sourceof the human spirit. Poetic, profane, patriotic, pulsing, powerful, ponderous,and plagiaristic-musicfrom the secondhalf of the twentieth century merits seriousinvestigation.

This was an essentialtenet of Popular Music and Society. It remainsmy guiding principle today. Since the Rock Revolution predatedthe appearanceof PMS by more than fifteen years,the following reflectionson the journeysof music fans, critics, researchers,librarians, collectors, and artists span five decades. The conclusionsI've reachedare tentative. My observationsremain sub- ject to change. Yet, like Robert Frost'spoetic traveler, I continueto find that selectionsof particulartopics, bands,and recordingsfor study tend to define one's life.

No music scholar can traverse all intellectual roads, follow all methodologicalpaths, or tread all genre highways. This essayby B. The ability to move beyond narrow biographical or stylistic pathways and to perceive the virtues of other wanderersis a special gift.

All good editors possessit. They revel in the travels of individuals who think, conjure, perceive, analyze,and write The value of an experimentaljournal such as PMS, whetherunder Ron Denisoff'sfounding leadershipor Gary Bums's skillful editorial hand, is that it encouragesscholarsto envision music from a diversity of perspectives. The following pagescontain the ruminationsof a fifty-five-year-old teenagerwho is constantlyreminded that Billy Joel was right.

Bob Segerwas too. Although public memory may fade, rock 'n' roll neverforgets. I DespiteHBO's video hoopla and Cleveland'scommercialzeal for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame,therewill neverbe a mausoleumto authent- ically tout rock's rebelliousroots. It isn't becausethere are no rebelsleft. There are plenty. But the s society that warmly applauds Chuck Berry, that finds Jerry Lee Lewis enchanting,that marvelsat Little Rich- ard's antics, and that idealizesFats Domino cannotbegin to comprehend the glittering magic of their vibrant personasamid the s pastel pop music scene.

Energy, brilliance, pandemonium,experimentation,vitality, and dangerlurked in the lyrics, licks, and leersfrom theseseeminglytame, externallyantiqueartists. I suspecttheir internal fires still bum. Fortunate- ly, the music producedduring their youth still belchesforth over high- poweredstadiumspeakersbetweeninnings, at halftimes, or during post- game celebrations. But so much of the rock music that followed was counterfeit. So many artists lost the "feel" while searchingto reproduce the "sound.

What might havebeenis tantalizing to consider. So is the specter of reconstructingthe spirit of the early rock era. II Humor has always been a staple of rock 'n' roll. Along with Elvis, the early yearsof rock were spicedby the zaninessof disc jockeysand an array of lyrical lunatics. I'm always pleased to discover a new Pinkard and Bowden CD.

Though occasionallyprofane, their irreverencetoward contemporaryso- cial and political idiocy reminds me of the satirical roles played by Tom Lehrer and others. The mindlessbanterof Homer and Jethro,the marvel- ous situation comediesof Ray Stevens,the bizarre word play of Sheb Wooley, and the thousandsof little-known and less-heraldedanswersong performers constituted the funny bone of modern music's mechanical monster.

Weird Al Yankovic still makesmoney the old-fashionedway- with his tonguein his cheek. Long live Larry Verne! May Lonnie Donegan neverdiscoverthe truth aboutthe hardeningof chewinggum! III Popularmusic should never be categorized. It deludesthe variety, weakensthe artistry, and worst of all segmentslistening audiences. Rhythm 'n' blues, rock 'n' roll, doo- wop, and all the magnificentmusical variationsof the swere wildly integratingforces of black and white joy. PeterGuralnick, StanleyBooth, Michael Bane, and others have laudedvarying uniting elementsof inter- racial artistry that in tandemproducedclassicsounds.

The BeatlesandThe Rolling Stonesreadily acknowledgetheir roots in mixed racial artistry. But race is less important than rhythm. Fast or slow, country or pop, jazz or blues-LouisArmstrong or Duke Ellington expressedthe universal truth.

There are only two kinds of music: good and bad. Roger Rollin and Simon Frith have addedtheir own corollariesto that judgment. In matters of aestheticdecision,only the earof the beholderis relevant. Time is being supersededby commercial culling. Generationalgaps are filled with musical nostalgia. While my 1,little discs receivelittle attentionand my LP collectiongathersdust, I have gradually warmed to compact discs as reasonablereplacements.

The joy of discoveringretrospectivereleases,especiallyflips ide antholo- gies and answersongcollections thanks,Bear Family Records ,is a hearten- ing way to rediscoverearly rock gems.

The demise of the critical generalisthasled to conquestby the specialist. The advantagesof a writer who knows an immenseamountof songs,artists, and history of a particular genre is the backboneof academicscholarshipin traditional disciplines.

For music analysts,however,it is a disaster. For rock journal- ists, it is even worse. Breadthof listening experienceand stylistic interest undergirdsthe quality of analysis. Without historical understanding,each new group seemslike somethingspringing from the head of Zeus. No roots. No predecessors. No context. No distinguishingcharacteristics. No points of comparisonor contrast. Even if they are well-documented,the crampedvision of fandom is stifling. Specializationis the baneof music analysisin general,not just in the realm of biographical studies.

Too many theoreticiansare sociological! Their studies reflect their expertise. Pageafter pageof jargon, arcanenotations,methodologi- cal structures-butabysmally small samplesof song lyrics or performer commentaries. Even those specialistswith musical notation training tend to demonstratelittle overview of popular music history while pouring forth grandtheoriesaboutChuck Berry's licks or Buddy Holly's vocaliza- tion.

The viability of popularmusicobservationrestsin a deep,rich, broad conversationwith popular music. Nothing can substitutefor that. It is the prerequisitefor creative,analytical,critical thought. Introduction 5. Recordreviewing is a lost cause. The reasonsfor this phenomenonare relatedto the broadeningof commercialinterestsand the narrowing per- ceptions of music critics.

Recording companiesreadily supply review copiesof new releases,but always with the tacit expectationof laudatory comments. Review editorsyield to theseexpectationsby assigningspecif- ic discsto specialistsin heavymetal,rap, pop, rock, or whatever.

The more zealousthe specialistis, the less likely that critical objectivity will enter into the analysis. Too bad. As the rock era matures, it is increasingly possible to compareand contrast album themes,song lyrics, performer styles, and other aspectsof particular discs.

It is also reasonableto place LP) in historical context and to note the repetition of designatedideas, riffs, or individual tunes. Yet the vast majority of contemporaryreviews are parochial,noncritical, pandering,and largely unreliable as disc selec- tion devices. The early yearsof rock provide little guidanceto resolvethis reviewing quandary, though. Perhapsborrowing a technique initiated by Leonard Featherfor jazz reviews might help. Invite articulate artists and broadly knowledgeablejournaliststo participatein "blind" critiquesof soon-to-be- issued but as yet unreleasedcompact discs.

Share reactions, thoughts, insights,and concernsamongprofessionals. Let it all hangout-thegood, the bad, the ugly. Then invite rock critics in pairs to react to thesenew releasesfrom historical, creative, and quality of music perspectives. Put the Siskel and Ebert film review dynamic to work in the field of popular music. A journal such as PMS would be able to launch this kind of interactionmore readily thanfan-drivenmagazinessuchasKerrang!

Recordreviewing ought to be a critical art with intellectual and educationalaims. Presently,it is a self-congratulatory systemof merchandisingwithout any senseof balance,propriety, or history.

More- over, selectingthemesfrom lyrics can offer insight into the contemporary humancondition. This is no time to ceasepublishing. VIII Linking librarians and record collectors is the key to sustaining the scholarly study of twentiethcentury popularmusic. The SoundRecordings Archive at Bowling GreenStateUniversity ought to becomea model for the method of assembling,cataloging,and making available to seriousmusic studentsthe broadestrealm of contemporarymusic.

Certainly,jazz archives, country collections,bluesarchives,and other specialtyareasremaininvalu- able. But the salvaging of private collections,a task lovingly pursuedby Bowling Green'sWilliam L. Schurk, is a key task to be achievedover the next five decades. It is humorous to recall how ephemeraleven the most successfulrock pioneersconsideredtheir s recording efforts.

No one could have pre- dicted either the commerciallongevity or the social impact of rock 'n' roll. But from the vantage point of the mids, it is obvious that scholarly investigationof the s, s,s,and swill dependupon liberat- ing the much-loved private record collections from Goldmine readersand DISCoveriesenthusiasts. Although the manufacturedretrospectivesof Time- Life Music afford truly enjoyablecasuallistening, researchinto rock history will require accessto original audio sources.

As today'sprivate collectorsage and die, librarians and sound recording archivists must convince their spouses,sons, daughters,and other family membersto donatethe cherished collections intact to archival facilities. Emotional attachmentand greed will be staunchfoes in this resource-accumulation pursuit. So will intransigence. The best bet for accomplishingthis task is a fIrm commitment from the collectors themselvesto carefully transfer their most treasureddiscs directly to a community of music scholars.

Deferredgiving via last will and testament bequestsmay sound outrageousas a means of assembling an academic archive. But it is the bestway to assurethat the heritageof Americanpopular music won't be frittered away in the fashion that Gordon Stevensonde- scribedconcerning"race records"of the sand s. IX God save us from postmodemists,British theoreticians,zealousethnogra- phers, and pompous twits. The study of popular music should be fun. But over the past fIfteen years the fIeld of music analysishas been invaded by ideologuesof many stripes.

PerhapsI am too eclectic--or too dull to comprehendthe geniuslurking beneathso many convolutedarticles appearingin Britain's Popular Music and other internationaljournals. Granted, the slobbering silliness of Americanfanzine ravings are no better. The machinationsof supposedly well- trained scholarsare much more harmful, particularly when they elevate obtusehypothesesabovecommonsense. But the lyrics of popular songscaptureme.

I am enamoredof gifted writers. Wordsmithsfascinate me. But literary pageslack the soul-stealingrhythm of soundrecordings. Despitethe preachingof David Pichaskeand Richard Goldstein,I am not convinced that traditional poetry and rock lyrics are interchangeable. Sound recordingsas a total experience-wordsand music-areunique. The shamansof my life, the gatekeepersof ideasboth visible and hidden, are singers.

Ron Denisofffunctionedas a sociologicalscholarthroughouthis tenure as editor of Popular Music and Society. He was not adeptas a manuscript manager;he was not timely in correspondence with contributors;he was neither helpful nor particularly visible to neophytewriters; and he ex- haustedthe patience and goodwill of many of his Popular Press col- leagues.

But geniusneverfits a comfortablemold. His literary productiv- ity remainedhigh despiteill health. His critical and analytical skills were sharpto the end. The sadnessfor everyonewho knew and appreciatedhis talent was how soonit was gone. The Denisoff legacy is his scholarship-- books, articles, and a very specialjournal, Popular Music and Society.

The editorial skills that were so shallow for so long will now deepen. The love of popular music will not lessen. Diversity of literary talent is the guideline that the new editor appearsto be erecting.

No more one-manoperation. While both Denisoff and Burns cherishvariety of opinion, I sensethat the new editor will promote a strongerteam approachto both reviewing and manuscript assessment. PMS is in good hands. This study has surfed a variety of waves that continue to crashon the music scholarshipshores. It is a rare opportunity for a lyric analyst to commenton the generalstateof rock research. The observationsare tenta- tive. They are subjective.

But they are candidand, hopefully, helpful. I usethem. I recommendthem. The following texts are the most influential studiesthat I have encounteredduring my thirty years of popular music researchand writing.

Omission from this list does not indicate lack of value; inclusion does not certify superiority. The books featuredbelow have beeninstrumentalfor me in locating audio resources, in fostering ideas,and in illustrating perspectives. Michael Bane. New York: PenguinBooks. On the Radio: Music Radio in Britain. Carl Belz. The Story of Rock SecondEdition. New York: Harperand Row.

Stanley Booth. New York: PantheonBooks. John Broven. Rhythm and Blues in New Orleans. Harry Castlemanand Walter J. New York: BallantineBooks. Harry Castlemanand Walter 1.

The BeatlesAgain? The End of the Beatles? SteveChappleand ReebeeGarofalo. Chicago: Nelson-Hall,Inc. Introduction 9. Donald Clarke ed. The PenguinEncyclopediaof Popular Music. New York: Viking Penguin,Inc. Norm Cohen with music edited by David Cohen. BarbaraCohen-Stratyner ed. Nik Cohn. London: PicadorBooks. Stuart Colman. Poole,Dorset, England:Blandford Press. Lee Cooper. Westport,CT: Greenwood Press. Lee Cooperand Wayne S.

Lee Cotten. New York: RandomHouse. Inside MTV. Sing a Songof SocialSignificance. Serge Denisoff and Richard A. Peterson eds.

Serge Denisoff and William D. Risky Busi- ness:Rockin Film. SergeDenisoff, with the assistanceof William L. Robin Denselow. London: Faberand Faber. JonathanEisen ed. New York: Vintage Books. Philip H. Colin Escott, with Martin Hawkins. New York: St. Martin's Press. Bill Flanagan. Chicago:ContemporaryBooks, Inc. Simon Frith ed. Facing the Music. New York: Pantheon Books.

Simon Frith. Simon Frith and Andrew Goodwin eds. Jeffrey N. Westport,CT: GreenwoodPress. Charlie Gillett. New York: E. John Goldrosen and John Beecher. New York: Viking Pen- guin, Inc.

FernandoGonzalez comp. Flushing, NY: Gonzalez. Goodall, Jr. Michael H. Gray comp. New York: R. Bowker Company. Anthony J. Gribin and Matthew M. Introduction New York: Outerbridgeand Dienstfrey. Peter Guralnick. Boston: David R. Jeff Hannusch a. Almost Slim. Phil Hardy and Dave Laing. SheldonHarris comp. David Hatch and StephenMillward. Manchester,England: ManchesterUniversity Press.

Herb Hendler. Gerri Hirshey. The SoulBook. Frank W. The Literature of Rock, Hoffmann and B. David Horn comp. Charles Keil. Urban Blues. Chicago: University Chicago Press.

Paul Kingsbury and the Country Music Foundation eds. New York: Abbeville PublishingGroup. Donald W. BiographicalHandbookofAmerican Music. New York: Billboard Publications,Inc. Lewis ed. George H. Brady 1. Leyser, with additional researchby Pol Gosset camp.

Michael Lydon. New York: Dial Press. The RockMusic SourceBook. Dave Marsh. Linda Martin and Kerry Segrave. Hamden,CT: Archon Books. Betty T. Miles, Daniel J. MIles, and Martin J. Boulder, CO: ConvexIndustries. Jim Miller ed. Michael Ocbs. New York: Double- day and Company. Paul Oliver ed. The Blackwell Guide to Blues Records.

Cambridge,MA: Basil Blackwell. New York: Viking Press. Big AI Pavlow. David Pichaske. New York: SchirmerBooks. Robert Pruter. Chicago Soul. Walter Rimler. Jerome L. Chicago: Nelson-Hall, Inc. Schaffner, Nicholas.

Timothy E. Born in the U. Quentin J. Schultze, Roy M. Anker, James D. Bratt, William D. Romanowski,John W.

Worst, and Lambert Zuidervaart. The Down HomeGuide to the Blues. The RootsandRhythmGuide to Rock. Nat Shapiro and Bruce Pollock eds. Detroit, MI: Gale Research. Arnold Shaw. New York: Collier Books. New York: HawthornBooks, Inc. Wes Smith. Irwin Stambler. The Encyclopediaof Pop, Rock, and Soul revisededition. Paul Taylor comp. New York: Mansell PublishingLimited.

Nick Tosches. Country: The BiggestMusic in America. New York: Dell Publishing,Inc. New York: CharlesScribner'sSons. Jay Warner. New York: Billboard Books.

Pete Welding and Toby Byron eds. New York: DuttonlPenguin Books. Jerry Wexler and David Ritz. New York: Alfred A. Joel Whitburn comp. Pop Hits, Top Country Singles, Top Pop Album Tracks, Top PopAlbums,

Jamaica Ska - Skarface (2) - Cheap Pounk Skaaaaaa ! (CD, Album), Shade K - Crater Tunnels (File, MP3), Big Deal - Stephen Brodsky - Olé Sunday (Vinyl, LP, Album), Photographic - Various - MODEified VII - MODEified By 7 & MODEified By 7 Again (The B-Sides) (Fi, You Take Me Up - Thompson Twins / Ivan Cattaneo - You Take Me Up / Quando Tramonta Il Sol (Vinyl), Como Abeja Al Panal - Juan Luis Guerra 4 40* - Grandes Éxitos De Juan Luis Guerra 4 40 (Greatest Hit, No Limit (Bass Mix) - Various - Targets New Beat Story - Second Chapter (Cassette), Im Real (Murder Remix) (Clean) - Jennifer Lopez - Im Real (Murder Remix) (CD), A Piece Of Me - Various - Killed By Death #4 (Vinyl, LP), Various - Bio-Hazard Xplorationz (File, MP3), Dagger Through The Heart - Dolly Parton - Halos & Horns (CD, Album), Dont Pass Me By - The Georgia Satellites - Open All Night (Vinyl, LP, Album)

Due to unsuccessful auditions, they decided to play with a MIDI sequencer to do the bass parts quite difficult to do live - and started writing their first original material. Soon, however, they dissolved and the band went into a two years hiatus. InLibertini was replaced by Nicki Defala and recorded their first album. Two years later, inoriginal Gnats drummer Mark Conese joined the group again and in came new bassist Wayne Zito. In he was joined by Thorsten Reinhardt.

A re-release, 20 bit remastered with added bonus tracks, of "Liquid Mirror" was scheduled for spring This track appears towards the end of the CD, which may be a bit too long in my opinion.

CD Swedish female singer and keyboardist that started her career as a jazz pianist in the early s. She abandoned jazz after discovering the Hammond organ and founded a rock group called Meritones with whom she recorded an LP during the late s.

Soon after the Meritones dissolved, while Merit continued on her own. Her solo material drew heavily on traditional Swedish folk music, coupled with largely instrumental progressive rock. His biography and discography is closely related to that of his band Tribal Tech. LP Relativity CD, ? Then return and pick out the good pieces here. But I presume that he has had a good time recording the disc. In summer ofhe dropped out to work solo.

The music on his only. In early Hennig assembled a new line-up for Ihre Kinder, ending his short solo-career. Although at first the combination of musicians seems a little odd, there is some logic to the choice.

The line-up consists of Tim Bowness on vocals and guitar, Stephen Bennet on keys and guitars, Fudge Smith on drums, Peter Chilvers on bass, stick, guitar and keys, Michael Bearpark on guitar and Myke Clifford on sax and flute. I can imagine some of you will never have heard of most of these bands, but Fudge is mostly known for his work with Pendragon and Steve Hackett whilst Tim is of course one of the main figures in No-Man. And some of the fantastic climaxes in some tracks can even be associated with Godspeed You Black Emperor!.

A very exciting record screaming for a follow-up! The result can be heard on two albums recorded by Transatlantic. Another example of putting some guys in one room and let them make some prog music is Henry Fool. Listening to it, it only shows that every combination is different. The album has some fine moments but they also did some things that not really is my kind of prog - no Transatlantic but certainlly worth listening.

He was responsible for penning a number of multi-million selling albums and singles as well as giving Uriah Heep their distinctive keyboard sound. After his time in Uriah Heep, he played for some time in the Southern rock band Blackfoot. An average rock album, tasteful but nothing special.

Not that this should be of any importance, since progressive rock never relied on sex appeal anyway. Hensley organ and Lawton vocals are accompanied by a bunch of to me unknown but capable musicians and play a pleasant set of songs, nicely mixing uptempo rockers with balladish stuff.

Fine classic, melodic hard rock with some proggy touches. The band plays pretty good, but to me Hensley is the star of the show who switches without any problems between keyboards, the Hammond and various guitars, while doing most lead vocals. I get the impression that Wetton is more present as a decoration of the show.

As said, a pleasant show with one minor note: the stage act of Dave Kilminster. I never before saw him live, but he looks like a complete jerk to me. The CD is housed in a cover that might fit an average power metal band with a castle, moody. The music, however, is a bit lighter with pleasant melodic rock with proggy touches. Although one may compare it to the mid-period from the early s of course. Most of the pieces have gotten a nice and for my taste very pleasing arrangement turning them into an either jazz-rock e.

A nice surprise this LP! Heon has been a member of unknown bands like Shades, Stop, Nations and Anxiety before coming with a solo album. On this aptly titled CD Heon certainly succeeds in the exploration of his instrument. Heon makes no concessions on this CD, which sounds raw and introvert. His capability to get every sound out of his instrument as far as he likes to go results in a variety of techniques, such as variable pitch, synth effects and riff loops. What I found the most remarkable after listening, that this CD may sound too self-indulgent for most listeners.

Together with an incoherent structure, this CD contains many interesting directions, but never seems to be fully convincing. They were founded in in Barcelona. The form and music of Here And Now immediately reminded me of some of the more raw-sounding Gong material and how the Ozric Tentacles started to play free festivals in the early 80s.

This band must have been an influence on the Ozrics, but the Ozrics were so keen to speed the music a bit up, as Here And Now sounds too slow at some moments. Their music is said to be comparable to French group Heldon. The ELP cover sounds rather faithful in the piano version, while the Rush cover is downright surprising. In most of the songs the focal point is Macan s play on the vibraphone and the marimba, accompanied by a strong and tight rhythm-section.

The way Macan changes this rather bombastic piece into a mellow song with vibraphone and marimba leads along a short part with Micromoog and ARP stringensemble tells everything about his musical ideas: this man makes music the way he wants it!

A very special effect is the flute-sounding soprano-recorder, used in several tracks. In my opinion this kind of music a bit in the vein of jazz would be a sensation on the worldwide very popular annual Northsea Jazz Festival in my hometown The Hague! It sounds amazing and impressive but if you re not into classical piano I wonder if it appeals to you.

Nice discussion: is the rather unusual music more progressive than most progrock bands today? The overall sound is melodic, simply arranged and very well played.

But the production sounds a bit dull to my ears. Influences from old Canterbury stuff can be heard clearly early Soft Machine, Caravan but also avant-garde, Eastern music sitars! These musicians know how to impress their audience, with carefully crafted and structured music. Quite a nice listening, mainly for proggies who are looking further than the usual crossover stuff!

Very powerful sounding, and despite the omnipresence of mallets very much oriented on ELP I think. Ever wanted to know how an adventurous ELP sounds with a vibes player? Check this out! The musicians were a bunch of long haired Italians who lived in Germany and released their album there, which is why they are often listed as part of the Krautrock scene, but also musically the link to Krautrock is obvious. CD mini-CD British folk-rock band named after the wading bird.

He was a former member of Incredible String Band. The group was sort of a spin off from Jazz Is Dead. The gentlemen play all-instrumental music on this disc which is much like that of Dixie Dregs - a mixture of jazz-rock and swampy Southern rock. In "Justice" T. Lavitz takes turns on organ and piano and this is one of the highlights of the CD in my opinion.

What else should I mention? He was active in electroni, experimental and new wave during the late s and early s. He is known by connaisseurs for his work with groups like Aussenminister, Input and Model 81, but also as a collaborator with Conrad Schnitzler as Con-Hertz and doing solo work. When he left Jane during the s, he became a multiinstrumentalist, playing guitars, keyboards, bass, drums and effects on his solo-debut. Many years later, Hess made another album with technodance music.

His CD was very aptly titled because it was a guitar-only disc, recorded in and The music is not quite what I expected. I was prepared to listen to some Soft Machine-like experimental jazz-rock, but instead I was offered a very pleasant and tranquil disc with a soundscape-like foundation of Hewins over which Elton Dean plays his modest, quiet jazz saxophone parts.

The music is divided into three long tracks on the CD, but in fact it listens like one ongoing piece of music. Very pleasant indeed. They did a demo and then debuted with a live album in Jean, Pierre. Their LP contains mainly long tracks. He did an album together with keyboard player Nick Magnus on whose albums he also guests.

The two met during touring with Steve Hackett. The CD had guest Chris Juergensen on lead guitar on one track. Maybe The HSD fun name, by the way put a bit more relaxed playfulness in their work than the blast-youaway- yet-not-drown-you-in-any-way -virtuosity of LTE. The band was formed at Hiidenlinna community in The record was mostly home made with an eight-track recording machine.

In they did their first proper album for the Silence label. It came out in August An average of over 8 minutes per track. The whole album is like a flow, very tribal.

Also the instruments seem to be all in balance, no instrument dominates the sound. The music almost sounds natural. Fans from Ozric Tentacles, Hawkwind, Gong and related bands surely need to check out this band. At the same time people that normally do not like so much psychedelic music may enjoy this band.

It is music for heart and mind. And for the feet. LP Mexican cosmic space rock group who made one 25 minute mini-LP. Hill had played with a beat group called The Answers earlier in the s and released two singles on Columbia with this group. Inhe joined American psychedelic rockers The Misunderstood. A few years later he joined forces with former Warm Sounds singer Denny Gerrard, who was now a producer.

Nevertheless, the band would only last for two albums and fall apart. Both early LPs became highly wanted and collectable items. After the split, Pavli went to work as a session musician. Tony Hill went to do solo work and carried on under the name of High Tide during the s. First: the enormous power that is unleashed by the band right from the first seconds later on, they show that they can hold back as well, and there are even classical influences. Second: the vocals that sound exactly like Jim Morrison of The Doors, and also the music has some touches of this band here and there, yet much more progressive sounding.

To describe High Wheel s music isn t really easy, but one thing is for sure: it is definitely progressive rock! There are no obvious influences to be heard, some structures remind me of Yes or Floyd, and off course now and then there appears the "Tull-flute", but overall the music is very original and above all full of variation in style, emotions, mood and tempo.

The band play both long songs, like "High wheel in the sky" which lasts, divided in two parts, over 34 minutes, and short songs. These short songs are off course more accessible but never commercial or boring.

Just listen to "Conjuction of upper spheres". This is one of the best examples of a very sophisticated rocksong with lost of changes and variation. One remarkable thing are High Wheels vocals. Usually vocals are the weak spot of progrock bands, especially when they are from Germany. But not in this case. The vocals are almost completely free of any annoying accent. Also remarkable are the very well performed harmony vocals, which become one of High Wheels "trademarks" while listening to their music.

High Wheel is definitely one of the best new bands in the progressive scene and a great promise for things to come. The vocals have become even better and the music has gained refinement. Great band. Its amazing to hear them do perfect harmony vocals like this.

Overall: impressive. Actually, Highdelberg was very much a Genrich-solo-LP, since he wrote the music and also was co-producer. LP, 19?? CD British band. CD Dutch melodic rock band. Around they released a demo which contained covers as half of the material. In another demo followed, on CD this time. On this CD were five songs, recorded on seven tracks since the 8 th track of the recorder was broken. The album contained mainly song oriented progressive psychedelic rock.

CD Hillage is a true space guitar legend. DVD, British musician and mulit-instrumentalist, playing electronic symphonic music. Audibly a solo project with a bit programmed sound at times, but really enjoyable.

It is all not too complex and very easy to listen to, but it has sometimes the same building up and tension of the old Tangerine Dream - something I do like very much. A shame of some weak parts, especially at the end of the CD. CD Musician from Iceland. Besides this, he also did several solo-albums. In the s, he started the Thinkman-project together with his girl friend Jeanette Obstoj lyrics. CD,remastered, including 2 bonus tracks An intriguing sophisticated pop album that stands firmly with one leg in prog territory.

Not an easy one, but nothing far out either. Strong s sound, of course. Very original music. CD compilation Flutist Chris Hinze started in the s in the Dutch jazz circuit on piano, but also studied flute at the Den Haag conservatory. Also he played as a keyboardist for Euson.

In he studied at the Berklee College of Music in Boston. The next year he formed the Chris Hinze Combination - a band with ever-changing line-ups, that nearly every year recorded an album. In Chris Hinze also received an award as soloist at the Montreux Jazzfestival.

After his debut, Chris Hinze released a flood of albums with very diverse artists and explorations in many different musical style like classical music, jazz, rock, reggae, ethnic music and new age. From the rather sinister ish cover picture a marshcorpse I had expected some more dissonant and exciting music.

Hardly any rock at all. Instead we get really pleasant instrumental new age-soft fusionproggish-pop stuff. CD This Japanese musician was the guitarist of symphonic hard rock group Novela. The album contains various drum solos recorded during the s. Another period of silence appeared when Tracy suffered from breast cancer and then recovered. A good intelligent hard rocking album, definitely better than the average progmetal CD.

An additional good impression is given by the booklet with drawings accompanying the lyrics. The group released one cassette. CD This folk-rock musician was one of the leading members of Dulcimer. People who like good make that very good bass work should listen to this anyway.

During the early s, he left this group after internal problems and decided to embark on a solo career, which fairly quickly brought two albums. Just before he was to go on tour to support his second LP, however, he had an accident at home and broke both wrists making it impossible to tour.

A relative period of silence followed. For some time, there was talk of Hodgson being a possible replacement of Jon Anderson in Yes during the early s. Most tracks are instrumentals with - of course - a major role for the violin but not too dominant and one track with eerie female vocals. Enjoyable, but I would have loved a bit more tension. The others are Coleridge, Blake and Novalis, but as a poet he is the most important and he was worshipped and admired during the 19 th Century.

Here he met his friends, Hegel and Schelling among them. When he died on 7 Junehe had spent almost 40 years of his life in isolation. When, in Novemberthe brothers Christian and Jochen Joachim von Grumbkow LP) to use the name of this poet for their new group they got LP) with Nanny de Ruig, the daughter of a Dutch general, and several other musicians, they already had acquired had a lot of experience with some other groups.

Since they played music of the Beatles with the Beatkids and around they started fooling around with blues with the Action Issue Blues Band. Besides that the brothers played classical music, on trumpet and cello respectively and since they were influenced by the work of Neil Young, Stephen Stills, Fairport Convention, Pentangle and mainly the music of Traffic.

In August of the same year they were contracted by Ohr-Musik. The music on this record can t be described as symphonic rock, but it sounds more like a form of folk-rock with a strong scent of incense, not unlike the music of John Martyn and Christian von Grumbkow said about it: "I would call our music symphonic folk-pop, or classical influenced folk-rock, because our main lead-instruments in this period were, violin, cello and flute. Other lyrics were more critical on society.

Strange enough these lyrics were not included on the cover. The record was received very well and after a short period of time this new approach of rockmusic became legendary.

Also the group was broadcasted on national television. During this year the sound of the group changed. The arrangements grew more complex, "the mainly acoustic played guitar-parts and romantic string-duets are complemented with firm organ- and violin-solo s" Christian von Grumbkow.

The lyrics were getting politically more engaged and got a more literary character. The work of German poets like Berthold Brecht was used. At the end of Nanny de Ruig, who had meanwhile married Christian, disappeared from the stage, because she was pregnant and wanted to spend more time with the children.

This meant a serious loss, because the music was strongly written for her voice. The folk-elements disappeared and improvisation became the keyword. The group worked on a concept-album, and the German lyrics as well as a part of the music were completed, "but in a certain way the whole project broke down.

We didn t have the energy to complete the whole thing" Christian von Grumbkow. This was preceded by a long period of juridical procedures and which was one of the reasons for taking so much time before a new record was released.

It should then be made for Rolf-Ulrich Kaiser but the group rejected this idea. Besides this, the members still didn t know which direction to go with their music.

Both the lyrics in German and English and the title were rejected and finally it turned into a record with lyrics in English and partly German songtitles. Christoph Noppeney, who on the first record played violin, viola, piano and flute, became the most important singer of the group and limited himself to playing the viola which is a bit larger than the violin and is tuned a fifth lower and the acoustic guitar.

The group was helped by Zeus B. The record, with a cover design by Christian von Grumbkow, was received well by critics. Further he wrote: "The production really shows here, every instrument has its place, doesn t crowd or clutter, the classical training of Nops Noppeney is very apparent. By now the band abandoned singing in German, English lyrics had been adopted, not merely thoughts translated in English, but entities of their own, a bit dreamy and intelligent, with a sense of humor.

The music had become more electric and although there were still folk-influences present, jazz-rockelements are also finding their place in the music. The brothers hailed from Berlin, but moved to Munich, where they formed a schoolband in Two years later they moved to Cologne and there they also played in all kind of amateur groups. Because Hans didn t want to do his compulsory military service, he registered in Berlin.

Inhabitants of this place didn t have to serve in the army. To anticipate the discovery he didn t live in this city, he used another name, something he only gave up after a few years. Nowadays he is calling himself Hans Maahn again and he plays amongst others with Gianna Nannini. It may very well be their best record ever. Peter Moser wrote: "It is divided into two guiding themes, a Clown side and a Cloud side, though the album is not really a concept album.

The band seems even tighter than on previous recordings. It is chiefly Jochen s showcase, keyboard dominated and some nice vocals, as well as fine viola playing by Nops. In one flowing motion, a gypsy violin heralds its arrival as you are suddenly surrounded by cheering people, the excitement mounts, you feel like a child again.

The master of ceremonies announces the show, clowns and dancing bears fill the centre ring, activities everywhere, so much to see, to do, is it real? If you listen carefully you will see the illusion for yourself. You are lying in the soft spring grass by a clear, swiftly running brook.

At peace with yourself, you just lie there on your back staring upward to the passing clouds. Slowly the ripples of water become gentle synthi weavings, joined by guitars, bass and flute. The music transports you to the clouds and suddenly takes you off on a fancy free flight, what have you got to lose? By now it has become apparent that Hoelderlin as successfully made the transition from folk-rock to full fledged rock jazz without losing their distinctive style.

In just a little over 12 minutes the band showcases their individual talents. It begins rather solemn, then takes on an airey quality that characterizes this whole side as it slowly progresses and builds into a veritable symphony. Altogether a fine production, very well conceived and recorded. According to Christian von Grumbkow there was much improvisation on the record, which contains "complex rockmusic with a leaning towards the orchestral and surrealistic".

The beautiful cover, an aquarel of Christian von Grumbkow, shows both sides and was made when the concept of the record was confirmed. Between and Christian studied with Rudolf Schoofs at the Werkkunstschule in Wuppertal and between and he did a guest study at the Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam. From to he teached drawing, painting and printing techniques at the Folkwangschule and the Gesamthochschule in Essen. The photographs of the groups members, which can be seen on the backside of the cover are made by Peter de Ruig, Nanny s brother, who is currently still working as a photographer in The Hague.

The record was received well and brought the group a breakthrough. They toured frequently and extensively and next to the Scorpions they have logged more live gigs than any other German band.

According to the article of Peter Moser their European reviews suggest that they are even better live than on record. In January and February the group toured again and did some performances in Sweden. The public exists mainly of students, who could appreciate the long jazzy improvisations on guitar, viola and cello. The tour was very successful, musically as well as according to the reactions of the public, but home again "we were physical and mentally completely exhausted" Christian von Grumbkow.

Christian can t combine his jobs as artist and teacher, with playing in the group and he decided to quit and limit himself to writing lyrics and being the manager and contact person. Thus the band had to look for a new guitarist.

Christian remained with the group at repetitions and in the recording-studio and next to this he gave lectures amongst other things about the relation between politics and music, and seminars about rockmusic for teachers.

A tough time began for the group, which still worked in a very democratic way: "Our sound-engineer earns the same as the musicians and me and he also has the same participationpossibilities. Even the four roadies. When they have any ideas, these are always discussed by everybody" according to Christian von Grumbkow. Also he said that "The new guitarist was a difficult person, who, being a Spanishman, had troubles with the cold and policecontrols caused by the problems with the terroristorganization Baader Meinhof group in Germany.

He went his own way and was very demanding, but not very co-operative". This album was recorded between the beginning of June and the end of August and the music has been compared with those of groups like Soft Machine, Caravan. The cover was again designed by Christian von Grumbkow: "The bird on the cover is meant as a symbol for the dream, fantasy and creativity and the woman symbolises mankind.

From the hair of the woman grows the bird, like the powerful subconscious. The consciousness in fact is just the tip of the iceberg, whilst the subconsciousness is the much bigger part under water.

In the fall, the group toured again and put quite a visual performance on stage, with projections on a screen which seized the full width of the stage and was four and a half meters in height.

Encouraged by a sold-out venue, the group performed a fantastic concert. This double-album, which was released in early contained two new songs, and formed the conclusion of a period. The songs written by Pablo Weeber weren t reprensative enough and they are not on the record. Besides this he left the group at the end ofbecause of disagreements and differences in attitude about the music. Pablo was replaced by Tommy Lohr on the records his name is spelled L Ohr who had studied at the Darmstadt college of music and played for six years in the surroundings of Frankfurt for American soldiers, this way gathering lots of experience.

The rest of the group was enthusiastic and within three days he learned the repertoire. In March he joined the group on a tour which brought them also to the folk-rock-festival of Schwenningen. At the same time, Christian exposed his paintings in Remscheid and half of them was sold. In late Christoph Noppeney changed the bow for a scalpel and started studying medicine. Michael Bruchman left as well. Again the readers of Sounds chose the group as the most underestimated.

Of this album Christoph Noppeney, who had never done much writing on the other records, wrote the music of six of the eight songs. In one song he also took over lead vocals.

The symphonic elements are gone and because the viola of Christoph Noppeney is missing, Hoelderlin lost a vital element. The music had become more contemporary and sounds more direct. The style of the cover is very different from the other albumcovers as well. The photographs were also shown on the before mentioned posters. In the November-issue of Fachblatt Music Magazin they were featured with a 14 page photo-report, which showed that the singer was a real enrichment, especially visually.

He moved like Peter Gabriel on the stage, with costumes and all, this way illustrating the music in a great way, without ever imitating the former Genesis-singer. Although the songs on the record were much shorter than before, the group gave it all on stage. They gave 40 concerts and the tour was a huge success. In the Munich Olympiapark they group drew an audience of 8. The last 30 concerts were completely sold-out. Fans were regularly storming the stage and the critics were praising.

They wrote about a strong mix of melodic rock and an imaginative show, virtuoso solos and optical gags. On the 18th of November the group could be seen in the rocknight in Bochum. The critics wrote about an uninspired product, without any concept, a description which is, if one compares the album with previous records, not completely beside the thruth. Nevertheless this record gave the listener some nice songs with German lyrics again.

Unfortunately this also was the end for Hoelderlin. Due to the last product, the record companies seemed to have lost all interest in the group and consequently they split up. The music of Kowalski can in no way be compared with any work of Hoelderlin.

Eduard Schicke returned to Oldenburg and became the owner of a dancing and started giving percussion-demonstrations. Christoph Noppeney now works as a paediatrician and still makes music classical and covers of Hendrix, Clapton, Gabriel and The Stones, just for fun.

Michael Bruchmann owns a shop for. Christian von Grumbkow still works as a teacher and painter. In he celebrated his 50 th birthday with an exposition in Wuppertal. His brother Joachim worked as an architect and co-orporated with Christian until he died in The name of Hoelderlin lives on in Hoelderlin Express, a German folk-group.

Oddly the music evokes mainly parallels to some of the Italian symphonic rock groups but the vocals are entirely different, of course. Other comparisons popping up at moments include Jethro Tull at their most symphonic and not bluesya bit of Supertramp and a slight flair of Genesis. At least it does add some uniqueness to the sound. Interesting: the also slightly experimental long track "Death-watch-beetle". The double live album is their finest work and showcases the band at their pinnacle.

The music was recorded in the Wuppertaler Opernhaus in October All 9 melodic tracks have their own climate and features fluid accellarations, nice interludes, pleasant keyboards string-ensemble, electric piano, organ and clavinet and great interplay between electric guitar and violin. Many solos are supported by the wonderful and distinctive sound of the string-ensemble, a compelling combination!

Gone are the folky touches, instead the orientation is more mainstream, electronic, here and there are even very slight traces of fusion detectable. Rather slick sympho-pop, but I like it. At times Hoelderlin even seems to flirt with the Neue Deutsche Welle. What a waste of talent regarding the previous work. Some nice tunes though, but as a whole disappointing. At least, kind of. Musically, the band remains in symphonic waters, but a bit different than I recall them.

First of all are there both male and female vocals. Then we do find some influences like medieval and folky elements, but also modern dance rhythms. A competent return. The band was formed in December by Rogge, Lang, Krauss and Mayr all seasoned musicians with experience in other groups. For these recordings percussionist Ralf Gottschald was invited to join, and shortly after the sessions he became a proper member. The group toured extensively throughout Europe to promote the album.

InHoenig moved to the USA nevertheless, to write soundtracks. Most soundtrack work is unreleased, however. Over the years he had a number of. He also played with Association P. This new band was without African musicians, but with wind instruments. The idea for this new group was conceived at the Pili Pili anniversary tour, musically based on previous work with Pork Pie etc.

His album was recorded in Florence with Jacqueline Darby and Simo Valzania during the summer of and winter of A fantastic blend of medieaval music, folk, prog and some jazz that electric piano! The LP is said to be extremely rare with an edition of only copies. Guest on the album was Flocki Weber on percussion. Interestingly, they recorded their only album in Brazil. Reissued om CD. HOJAS - -?? Reactions were positive, so they started looking for other band members.

In Januarykeyboardist Ken Archer and bassist Jerry Lalancette joined, completing the first of many line-ups. The first few months of this line-up were spend writing songs and preparing for playing live.

Shortly after this gig, Archer left the band, despite positive reactions of audience and press. He later resurfaced with band After The Fall.

After some months of searching, he was replaced by Mark Tannenbaum, with whom they recorded a homonymous mini-LP, released in November through a small local label in a limited edition of copies. Again, reactions towards the entirely instrumental, somewhat Camellike, music were favourable.

Also there was some airplay and many gigs were done, so Holding Pattern became relatively wellknown in the New England area. Even a video was made for the release. During the following years, many line-up changes took place, leaving Spada as the only remaining original member. Rumours are that Holding Pattern is working on a new album. Also Tony Spada cut a solo CD for the same label, and another one ten years later.

Rhythm 'n' blues, rock 'n' roll, doo- wop, and all the magnificentmusical variationsof the swere wildly integratingforces of black and white America Today - Tupelo Chain Sex - Spot The Difference (Vinyl.

PeterGuralnick, StanleyBooth, Michael Bane, and others have laudedvarying uniting elementsof inter- racial artistry that in tandemproducedclassicsounds. The BeatlesandThe Rolling Stonesreadily acknowledgetheir roots in mixed racial artistry.

But race is less important than rhythm. Fast or slow, country or pop, jazz or blues-LouisArmstrong or Duke Ellington expressedthe universal truth. There are only two kinds of music: good and bad. Roger Rollin and Simon Frith have addedtheir own corollariesto that judgment. In matters of aestheticdecision,only the earof the beholderis relevant. Time is being supersededby commercial culling.

Generationalgaps are filled with musical nostalgia. While my 1,little discs receivelittle attentionand my LP collectiongathersdust, I have gradually warmed to compact discs as reasonablereplacements. The joy of discoveringretrospectivereleases,especiallyflips ide antholo- gies and answersongcollections thanks,Bear Family Records ,is a hearten- ing way to rediscoverearly rock gems. The demise of the critical generalisthasled to conquestby the specialist. The advantagesof a writer who knows an immenseamountof songs,artists, and history of a particular genre is the backboneof academicscholarshipin traditional disciplines.

For music analysts,however,it is a disaster. For rock journal- ists, it is even worse. Breadthof listening experienceand stylistic interest undergirdsthe quality of analysis. Without historical understanding,each new group seemslike somethingspringing from the head of Zeus.

No roots. No predecessors. No context. No distinguishingcharacteristics. No points of comparisonor contrast. Even if they are well-documented,the crampedvision of fandom is stifling. Specializationis the baneof music analysisin general,not just in the realm of biographical studies. Too many theoreticiansare sociological! Their studies reflect their expertise.

Pageafter pageof jargon, arcanenotations,methodologi- cal structures-butabysmally small samplesof song lyrics or performer commentaries. Even those specialistswith musical notation training tend to demonstratelittle overview of popular music history while pouring forth grandtheoriesaboutChuck Berry's licks or Buddy Holly's vocaliza- tion. The viability of popularmusicobservationrestsin a deep,rich, broad conversationwith popular music. Nothing can substitutefor that. It is the prerequisitefor creative,analytical,critical thought.

Introduction 5. Recordreviewing is a lost cause. The reasonsfor this phenomenonare relatedto the broadeningof commercialinterestsand the narrowing per- ceptions of music critics.

Recording companiesreadily supply review copiesof new releases,but always with the tacit expectationof laudatory comments. Review editorsyield to theseexpectationsby assigningspecif- ic discsto specialistsin heavymetal,rap, pop, rock, or whatever. The more zealousthe specialistis, the less likely that critical objectivity will enter into the analysis.

Too bad. As the rock era matures, it is increasingly possible to compareand contrast album themes,song lyrics, performer styles, and other aspectsof particular discs. It is also reasonableto place artists in historical context and to note the repetition of designatedideas, riffs, or individual tunes.

Yet the vast majority of contemporaryreviews are parochial,noncritical, pandering,and largely unreliable as disc selec- tion devices. The early yearsof rock provide little guidanceto resolvethis reviewing quandary, though.

Perhapsborrowing a technique initiated by Leonard Featherfor jazz reviews might help. Invite articulate artists and broadly knowledgeablejournaliststo participatein "blind" critiquesof soon-to-be- issued but as yet unreleasedcompact discs. Share reactions, thoughts, insights,and concernsamongprofessionals. Let it all hangout-thegood, the bad, the ugly. Then invite rock critics in pairs to react to thesenew releasesfrom historical, creative, and quality of music perspectives.

Put the Siskel and Ebert film review dynamic to work in the field of popular music. A journal such as PMS would be able to launch this kind of interactionmore readily thanfan-drivenmagazinessuchasKerrang! Recordreviewing ought to be a critical art with intellectual and educationalaims.

Presently,it is a self-congratulatory systemof merchandisingwithout any senseof balance,propriety, or history. More- over, selectingthemesfrom lyrics can offer insight into the contemporary humancondition.

This is no time to ceasepublishing. VIII Linking librarians and record collectors is the key to sustaining the scholarly study of twentiethcentury popularmusic. The SoundRecordings Archive at Bowling GreenStateUniversity ought to becomea model for the method of assembling,cataloging,and making available to seriousmusic studentsthe broadestrealm of contemporarymusic.

Certainly,jazz archives, country collections,bluesarchives,and other specialtyareasremaininvalu- able. But the salvaging of private collections,a task lovingly pursuedby Bowling Green'sWilliam L. Schurk, is a key task to be achievedover the next five decades.

It is humorous to recall how ephemeraleven the most successfulrock pioneersconsideredtheir s recording efforts. No one could have pre- dicted either the commerciallongevity or the social impact of rock 'n' roll. But from the vantage point of the mids, it is obvious that scholarly investigationof the s, s,s,and swill dependupon liberat- ing the much-loved private record collections from Goldmine readersand DISCoveriesenthusiasts.

Although the manufacturedretrospectivesof Time- Life Music afford truly enjoyablecasuallistening, researchinto rock history will require accessto original audio sources.

As today'sprivate collectorsage and die, librarians and sound recording archivists must convince their spouses,sons, daughters,and other family membersto donatethe cherished collections intact to archival facilities.

Emotional attachmentand greed will be staunchfoes in this resource-accumulation pursuit. So will intransigence. The best bet for accomplishingthis task is a fIrm commitment from the collectors themselvesto carefully transfer their most treasureddiscs directly to a community of music scholars. Deferredgiving via last will and testament bequestsmay sound outrageousas a means of assembling an academic archive.

But it is the bestway to assurethat the heritageof Americanpopular music won't be frittered away in the fashion that Gordon Stevensonde- scribedconcerning"race records"of the sand s.

IX God save us from postmodemists,British theoreticians,zealousethnogra- phers, and pompous twits. The study of popular music should be fun. But over the past fIfteen years the fIeld of music analysishas been invaded by ideologuesof many stripes. PerhapsI am too eclectic--or too dull to comprehendthe geniuslurking beneathso many convolutedarticles appearingin Britain's Popular Music and other internationaljournals.

Granted, the slobbering silliness of Americanfanzine ravings are no better. The machinationsof supposedly well- trained scholarsare much more harmful, particularly when they elevate obtusehypothesesabovecommonsense. But the lyrics of popular songscaptureme. I am enamoredof gifted writers. Wordsmithsfascinate me. But literary pageslack the soul-stealingrhythm of soundrecordings.

Despitethe preachingof David Pichaskeand Richard Goldstein,I am not convinced that traditional poetry and rock lyrics are interchangeable. Sound recordingsas a total experience-wordsand music-areunique. The shamansof my life, the gatekeepersof ideasboth visible and hidden, are singers. Ron Denisofffunctionedas a sociologicalscholarthroughouthis tenure as editor of Popular Music and Society. He was not adeptas a manuscript manager;he was not timely in correspondence with contributors;he was neither helpful nor particularly visible to neophytewriters; and he ex- haustedthe patience and goodwill of many of his Popular Press col- leagues.

But geniusneverfits a comfortablemold. His literary productiv- ity remainedhigh despiteill health. His critical and analytical skills were sharpto the end. The sadnessfor everyonewho knew and appreciatedhis talent was how soonit was gone. The Denisoff legacy is his scholarship-- books, articles, and a very specialjournal, Popular Music and Society.

The editorial skills that were so shallow for so long will now deepen. The love of popular music will not lessen. Diversity of literary talent is the guideline that the new editor appearsto be erecting. No more one-manoperation.

While both Denisoff and Burns cherishvariety of opinion, I sensethat the new editor will promote a strongerteam approachto both reviewing and manuscript assessment. PMS is in good hands. This study has surfed a variety of waves that continue to crashon the music scholarshipshores. It is a rare opportunity for a lyric analyst to commenton the generalstateof rock research. The observationsare tenta- tive.

They are subjective. But they are candidand, hopefully, helpful. I usethem. I recommendthem. The following texts are the most influential studiesthat I have encounteredduring my thirty years of popular music researchand writing. Omission from this list does not indicate lack of value; inclusion does not certify superiority. The books featuredbelow have beeninstrumentalfor me in locating audio resources, in fostering ideas,and in illustrating perspectives. Michael Bane.

New York: PenguinBooks. On the Radio: Music Radio in Britain. Carl Belz. The Story of Rock SecondEdition. New York: Harperand Row. Stanley Booth. New York: PantheonBooks. John Broven. Rhythm and Blues in New Orleans. Harry Castlemanand Walter J. New York: BallantineBooks. Harry Castlemanand Walter 1. The BeatlesAgain? The End America Today - Tupelo Chain Sex - Spot The Difference (Vinyl the Beatles? SteveChappleand ReebeeGarofalo.

Chicago: Nelson-Hall,Inc. Introduction 9. Donald Clarke ed. The PenguinEncyclopediaof Popular Music. New York: Viking Penguin,Inc. Norm Cohen with music edited by David Cohen. BarbaraCohen-Stratyner ed. Nik Cohn. London: PicadorBooks. Stuart Colman. Poole,Dorset, England:Blandford Press. Lee Cooper. Westport,CT: Greenwood Press. Lee Cooperand Wayne S. Lee Cotten. New York: RandomHouse. Inside MTV. Sing a Songof SocialSignificance.

Serge Denisoff and Richard A. Peterson eds. Serge Denisoff and William D. Risky Busi- ness:Rockin Film. SergeDenisoff, with the assistanceof William L. Robin Denselow. London: Faberand Faber.

JonathanEisen ed. New York: Vintage Books. Philip H. Colin Escott, with Martin Hawkins. New York: St. Martin's Press. Bill Flanagan. Chicago:ContemporaryBooks, Inc.

Simon Frith ed. Facing the Music. New York: Pantheon Books. Simon Frith. Simon Frith and Andrew Goodwin eds. Jeffrey N. Westport,CT: GreenwoodPress. Charlie Gillett. New York: E. John Goldrosen and John Beecher. New York: Viking Pen- guin, Inc. FernandoGonzalez comp.

Flushing, NY: Gonzalez. Goodall, Jr. Michael H. Gray comp. New York: R. Bowker Company. Anthony J. Gribin and Matthew M. Introduction New York: Outerbridgeand Dienstfrey. Peter Guralnick. Boston: David R. Jeff Hannusch a. Almost Slim. Phil Hardy and Dave Laing. SheldonHarris comp. David Hatch and StephenMillward. Manchester,England: ManchesterUniversity Press. Herb Hendler. Gerri Hirshey. The SoulBook. Frank W. The Literature of Rock, Hoffmann and B.

David Horn comp. Charles Keil. Urban Blues. Chicago: University Chicago Press. Paul Kingsbury and the Country Music Foundation eds. New York: Abbeville PublishingGroup. Donald W. BiographicalHandbookofAmerican Music. New York: Billboard Publications,Inc. Lewis ed. George H. Brady 1. Leyser, with additional researchby Pol Gosset camp. Michael Lydon. New York: Dial Press. The RockMusic SourceBook. Dave Marsh. Linda Martin and Kerry Segrave. Hamden,CT: Archon Books. Betty T. Miles, Daniel J. MIles, and Martin J.

Boulder, CO: ConvexIndustries. Jim Miller ed. Michael Ocbs. New York: Double- day and Company. Paul Oliver ed. The Blackwell Guide to Blues Records. Cambridge,MA: Basil Blackwell. New York: Viking Press. Big AI Pavlow. David Pichaske. New York: SchirmerBooks. Robert Pruter. Chicago Soul. Walter Rimler. Jerome L. Chicago: Nelson-Hall, Inc. Schaffner, Nicholas. Timothy E. Born in the U. Quentin J. Schultze, Roy M. Anker, James D.

Bratt, William D. Romanowski,John W. Worst, and Lambert Zuidervaart. The Down HomeGuide to the Blues. The RootsandRhythmGuide to Rock. Nat Shapiro and Bruce Pollock eds. Detroit, MI: Gale Research. Arnold Shaw. New York: Collier Books.

New York: HawthornBooks, Inc. Wes Smith. Irwin Stambler. The Encyclopediaof Pop, Rock, and Soul revisededition. Paul Taylor comp. New York: Mansell PublishingLimited. Nick Tosches. Country: The BiggestMusic in America. New York: Dell Publishing,Inc. New York: CharlesScribner'sSons. Jay Warner. New York: Billboard Books. Pete Welding and Toby Byron eds. New York: DuttonlPenguin Books. Jerry Wexler and David Ritz. New York: Alfred A. Joel Whitburn comp.

Pop Hits, Top Country Singles, Top Pop Album Tracks, Top PopAlbums, Top Pop Singles. Top Rhythm and Blues Singles, BrendaLee, a Georgia-borncountry artist who beganher professional singing career at age six, charted two Top national hits before her thirteenth birthday. Her most noted holiday-related song-"Rockin' Around the ChristmasTree"-wasrecordedfor Deccarecordsprior to her fourteenth birthday.

Before Brenda Lee's success,anotherthirteen-year- old youngsterscoreda No. But even younger children have producedpopular hit recordings. The previousparagraphillustratesthe roles of severalyoung peopleas popular music performers.

What is even more fascinating,though, is the variety of songsaddressingchildren'sinterests,images,perspectives,and youthful culture that haveachievedBillboard Top ranking since This chapterby B. Lee Cooperand William L. Reprint permissiongranted by the authors,editor Phillip J. Sleeman,and the WestwoodPress. It is almost as though America's postwar baby boom helped launch a new genreof kiddie-orientedrecordsthat have becomelong-term cultural staples. If the early rock era markedthe emergenceof teenagecontrol of the radio airwaves,the decadebeforeand the yearssince have featuredmany paeansto thosecarefreepreteens.

What kind of music has attractedyouthful attention? What type of re- cordingswill parentsgladly purchasefor their youngsters? After a rigorous review of the to Billboard Top charts, the answersare obvious. The following discographypresentsmore than Billboard-charted 45 rpm or 78 rpm records featuring children's themes. These songs are divided into fifteen thematictopics.

Soxx and The Blue Jeans Riley Butchart,Ronald E. Cooper, B. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press,pp. New York: GarlandPublishing, Frith, Simon. New York: PantheonBooks, New York: Routledge, Hall, Stuart and Paddy Whannel. New York: PantheonBooks,pp. Leyser,Brady 1. Westport,CT: Greenwood Press, Ross,Andrew and Tricia Rose eds. Schultze, Quentin J. Anker, JamesD. Romanowski, John W. Worst, and Lambert ZuiderVaart.

Eerd- mansPublishingCompany, Schurk, William L. Weinstein, Deena. West- port, CT: GreenwoodPress, pp. Chapter 2. This previously unpublishedessayby B. Lee Cooperwas developedas a review of severalYuletide compactdiscs releasedby Rhino Records. Nowhereis Americancultural diversity more clearly manifestedthan in the variety of annual commemorationsof the birth of Jesus. Public schoolsand collegesdismiss classes;newspapersand magazinesare flooded with holiday sale adver- tisements;and businessesprovide gala parties,specialbonuses,and even paid vacationsfor employeeslate in December.

Religion plays only one of many roles in America'schampioningof Christmas. The Yuletide season is a truly multicultural, pluralistic time when theology, economics,family relations,childhooddreams,and social mythology converge. Commercialrecordingcompanieshave issuedChristmassongsfor de- cades. Naturally, traditional Christian hymns were stapleson early twen- tieth century 78 rpm discs. Other types of seasonalsongsemergedduring the s and s,though. The rock era also contributeda variety of now widely celebratedYuletide songs.

The divergenceof themesfeaturedin holiday record- ings is obvious in this list of annualhits. Although the Bethlehemstory is still present, Santa Claus is more and more dominant.

So is comedy. Humor is found in children's perspectiveson gifts and through various adult misbehaviors. It is also locatedin talesdepictingimaginarycreatures who help Kris Kringle or who contributeto a youngster'ssenseof sharing throughtheir kindnessand caring.

Rhino Recordsof SantaMonica, California, has chronicledthe devel- opmentof America'sChristmasrecordinghit paradein two compactdisc collections featuring major Billboard-charted tunes. This is a valuable contribution to exploring commercialvinyl culture. But Rhino has gone well beyond charted hits to assembleseveral other anthologiesof less renownedChristmastunes. Subculturesof race, region, age, and musical tasteare amply representedin severalsplendidCD releases.

Lena Home, and others. The songspresentedare earthy, unconventional, and raucouslyfunny. The songsare iconoclasticand disjunctivein tone, theme, and lyric. The Rhino collectionsillustrate American cultural tolerance,self-criti- cism, and humor at their very best. Christianity and capitalism are juxta- posedwith glee; holy figures and holy terrors are matchedagainst talking snowmen,glowing reindeer,singing chipmunks,and barking canines,and traditional imagesof shepherds,stables,and starsare challengedby con- temporarydesiresfor wealth, wenches,and well-being.

Neither the Ku Klux Klan nor preachersof political correctnesswill understandthe public's fascinationwith thesemarveloushowl-a-daycollections.

But the young at heartwill genuinelyappreciatethis Rhino avalancheof Yuletide goodies. Let it snow! Michael Bane. New York: Penguin Books. Stephen Barnard. On the Radio: Music Radio in Britain. Carl Belz. The Story o f Rock Second Edition. New York: Harper and Row. Stanley Booth.

New York: Pantheon Books. John Broven. Rhythm and Blues in New Orleans. Harry Castleman and Walter J. New York: Ballantine Books.

The Beatles Again? The End o f the Beatles? Steve Chappie and Reebee Garofalo. Chicago: Nelson-Hall, Inc. Introduction 9 Donald Clarke ed. The Penguin Encyclopedia o f Popular Music. New York: Viking Penguin, Inc. Norm Cohen with music edited by David Cohen. Barbara Cohen-Stratyner ed. Nik Cohn. London: Picador Books. Stuart Colman. Poole, Dorset, England: Blandford Press. Lee Cooper. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. Lee Cooper and Wayne S. Lee Cotton.

Lee Cotten. New York: Random House. Serge Denisoff. Inside MTV. Sing a Song o f Social Significance. Serge Denisoff and Richard A. Peterson eds. Serge Denisoff and William D. Serge Denisoff, with the assistance of William L. Robin Denselow. London: Faber and Faber. Jonathan Eisen ed. New York: Vintage Books. Philip H. Colin Escott, with Martin Hawkins. New York: St. Bill Flanagan. Chicago: Contemporary Books, Inc. Simon Frith ed.

Facing the Music. Simon Frith. Simon Frith and Andrew Goodwin eds. Jeffrey N. Charlie Gillett. New York: E. John Goldroscn and John Beecher. Fernando Gonzalez comp. Flushing, NY: Gonzalez. Goodall, Jr. Michael H. Gray comp. New York: R. Bowker Company. Anthony J. Gribin and Matthew M. Iola, WI: Krause Publications. Introduction 11 Peter Guralnick.

New York: Outerbridge and Dienstfrey. Boston: David R. Jeff Hannusch a. Almost Slim. Phil Hardy and Dave Laing. Sheldon Harris comp. David Hatch and Stephen Millward. Manchester, England: Manchester University Press. Herb Hendler. Gerri Hirshey. The Soul Book. Frank W. The Literature o f Rock, Hoffmann and B. David Horn comp. Charles Keil. Urban Blues. Chicago: University Chicago Press.

Paul Kingsbury and the Country Music Foundation eds. New York: Abbeville Publishing Group. Donald W. Biographical Handbook o f American Music. New York: Billboard Publications, Inc. George H. Lewis ed. Brady J. Ixyser, with additional research by Pol Gosset comp. Michael Lydon. Boogie Lightning. New York: Dial Press. The Rock Music Source Book. Dave Marsh. Fortunate Son.

Linda Martin and Kerry Segrave. Hamden, CT: Archon Books. Betty T. Miles, Daniel J. Miles, and Martin J. Boulder, CO: Convex Industries. Jim Miller ed. Michael Ochs. Paul Oliver ed. The Blackwell Guide to Blues Records. Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell. Robert Palmer. Deep Blues. New York: Viking Press. Big A1 Pavlow. David Pichaske. New York: Schirmer Books. Robert Pruter. Chicago Soul.

Introduction 13 Walter Rimler. Jerome L. Schaffner, Nicholas. Timothy E. Born in the U. Quentin J. Schultze, Roy M. Anker, James America Today - Tupelo Chain Sex - Spot The Difference (Vinyl. Bratt, William D. Romanowski, John W. Worst, and Lambert Zuidervaart.

Eerdmans Publishing Company. The Down Home Guide to the Blues. The Roots and Rhythm Guide to Rock. Nat Shapiro and Bruce Pollock eds.

Detroit, MI: Gale Research. Arnold Shaw. New York: Collier Books. New York: Hawthorn Books, Inc. Wes Smith. Irwin Stambler. The Encyclopedia o f Pop, Rock, and Soul revised edition. Paul Taylor comp. New York: Mansell Publishing Limited. Nick Tosches. Country: The Biggest Music in America. New York: Dell Publishing, Inc. Jay Warner. New York: Billboard Books. Pete Welding and Toby Byron eds. Jerry Wexler and David Ritz.

New York: Alfred A. Joel Whitburn comp. Pop Hits, Top Country Singles, Top Pop Album Tracks, Top Pop Albums, Top Pop Singles.

Top Rhythm and Blues Singles, Chapter 1 Child Performers Brenda Lee, a Georgia-born country artist who began her professional singing career at age six, charted two Top national hits before her thirteenth birthday.

Before Brenda L. But even younger children have produced popular hit recordings. The previous paragraph illustrates the roles of several young people as popular music performers. This chaptcr by B. Lee Cooper and William L. Reprint permission granted by the authors, editor Phillip J. Sleeman, and the Westwood Press. If the early rock era marked the emeigence of teenage control of the radio airwaves, the decade before and the years since have featured many paeans to those carefree preteens.

What kind of music has attracted youthful attention? After a rigorous review of the to Billboard Top charts, the answers are obvious. These songs are divided into fifteen thematic topics. Cooper, B.

Westport, CT: Greenwood Press,pp. Epstein, Jonathan S. New York: Garland Publishing, Frith, Simon. New York: Pantheon Books, New York: Routledge, Hall, Stuart and Paddy Whannel.

New York: Pantheon Books,pp. Kirschner, Tony. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, Ross, Andrew and Tricia Rose eds. Schultze, Quentin J. Worst, and Lambert ZuiderVaart. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Schurk, William L. Weinstein, Deena. Lee Cooper was developed as a review of several Yulelide compact discs released by Rhino Records.

The Yuletide season is a truly multicultural, pluralistic time when theology, economics, family relations, childhood dreams, and social mythology converge. Other types of seasonal songs emerged during the s and s, though. The rock era also contributed a variety of now widely celebrated Yuletide songs. Although the Bethlehem story is still present, Santa Claus is more and more dominant.

So is comedy. This is a valuable contribution to exploring commercial vinyl culture. But Rhino has gone well beyond charted hits to assemble several other anthologies of less renowned Christmas tunes.

Subcultures of race, region, age, and musical taste are amply represented in several splendid CD releases. The songs presented are earthy, unconventional, and raucously funny. The songs are iconoclastic and disjunctive in tone, theme, and lyric. The Rhino collections illustrate American cultural tolerance, self-criticism, and humor at their very best.

But the young at heart will genuinely appreciate this Rhino avalanche o f Yuletide goodies. Let it snow! Barnett, James H. New York: Macmillan Company, Belk, Russell W. Butland, John. Or Stuff This in Your Stocking! Callahan, Mike. Canale, Larry. New York: Bantam Books,pp. Colby, J. The Making o f the Modern Christmas. Curtis, Bruce. Christmas Songs 35 Doggett, Peter. Elrod, Bruce. Fumar, Vincent. George, B. Grein, Paul. Harker, Dave. London: Hutchinson and Company, Ltd. Hoffmann, Frank. Hoffmann, Frank W.

Koenig, John. Boston: Dr. Godine, Lewisohn, Mark. Marsh, Dave and Steve Propes. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, Mawhinney, Paul C. McAuliffe, Jon. Milberg, David A. Chicago: D. Milberg, Moonoogian, George. Munn, Bob. Nathanson, Paul. Neely, Tim. Oksanen, Dave. Osborne, Jerry P. Prescott, AZ: Record Digest,pp.

Pattillo, Ceaig W. Portland, OR: Braemer Books,pp. Pimper, Steve. Radel, Cliff. IF, 3F. Rosen, Mark. Russell, Wayne. Scaramuzzo, Gene. Scoppa, Jordon. Sherwood, Lydia. Stidom, Larry. Stierle, Wayne. Studwell, William E.

Christmas Carols: A Reference Guide. New York: Garland Publishing, Inc. The Christmas Carol Reader. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press, Christmas Songs 37 Studwell, William E. Whitburn, Joel. By Jeff Pike. Boston: Faber and Faber, America Today - Tupelo Chain Sex - Spot The Difference (Vinyl Seattle freclance writer Jeff Pike presents a dark vision of the rock era. What a downer! This book should not be read by anyone suffering from either mild depression or a personality disorder.

Yet it is fraught with serious Haws in both structure and This chapter by B. Casual music fans and serious biographical researchers alike are going to be puzzled when trying to locate Jesse Belvin p. No index is provided. This also negates the pursuit of cross-references. Similarly questionable is why James Dean is included while Marilyn Monroe is not listed.

Nite, Donald Clarke, and a few other reference guide compilers in the acknowledgments section, but neglects to provide any bibliography of studies dealing specifically with death themes in rock music. These structural incongruities severely weaken the book. Music is actually the lifeblood of the rock era.

Even long-dead heroes—Jackie Wilson, Elvis Presley, John Lennon, Buddy Holly, and Jim Morrison—continue to yield hit after hit and to reign supreme on oldies-but-goodies airwaves, in reissued CDs, and on motion picture soundtracks. Jeff Pike obviously prefers obituary writing to marketing analysis. This robs his work of any real insight into the meaning and impact of recorded death themes throughout the fortyyear rock era.

Without paying much attention to the lyrical commentaries on death and dying featured on so many post recordings, Pike unwittingly ignores the pluralism of humor and horror that constitute the legacy of coffin tunes. These three songs are more than just lyrical retrospectives. They assess the psychological impact of death upon entire generations. Death 41 The death theme is omnipresent in rock lyrics. Several scholars who have investigated this topic have elected to focus on the narrow topic of teenage coffin songs.

Serge Denisoff, a particularly perceptive popular music analyst, notes that the short-lived popularity of love-lost-through-death songs was due to the rapid cultural and political changes occurring during the mids.

Still, the teenage coffin song did not return after However, the death theme did not disappear. In fact, it became more visible and more broadly explored in popular lyrics after There were also many songs about death and dying that were not simply teenage laments that were popular throughout the s.

These tunes explored more than just dejected drownings or accidental auto tragedies. What is more interesting, though, is the fact that the death theme appears in such a broad variety of visages over the past forty years.

As noted earlier, there are also a few epic hero songs that use either assassinations or accidental deaths of prominent political or musical figures as backdrops for generation-defining commentaries. There is considerable discussion about aging in contemporary songs. From the tender side of thirty, Pete Townshend of The Who proclaimed that he hoped he would die before he grew old. Train wreck sagas about the brave engineer Casey Jones are legion in folk music.

So are songs about John Henry. Within the popular song arena, automobile accidents and airline crashes are events that cause unexpected loss of life. In addition to the previously cited car death songs by Mark Dinning and Ray Peterson, the foremost examples of four-wheel disasters are J.

It is usually a complete surprise, a bitter shock. In sharp contrast to solitary, debilitating deaths, the passing of figures that are larger than life—whether heroes or villains— is always noteworthy. Heroes die, too. Murder and mayhem seem miles away from teenage coffin songs. Yet homicide is a common feature in popular tunes throughout the past forty years. Yet even more cold-blooded characters have found vinyl immortality since But American society has reserved the most deliberate death-dealing activity for its young men.

War is organized homicide. Gone to graveyards every one. Although Terry Nelson and C. What is it good for? Absolutely nothing! Most often, an act of suicide is described by a forlorn lover, by a remaining relative, or by a sad, confused friend. Although John Lennon and Elvis Presley have been praised on vinyl in every imaginable fashion, no single popular music artist has yet garnered a more well-crafted, skillfully performed, and positively received recorded eulogy than Buddy Holly.

As in most epic tales, there are references to a broad spectrum of historical characters. In this case, nearly all are musicians. Paul Simon, master songsmith, perceptive social analyst, and self-proclaimed child of the rock generation, seized the same historic scope as Don McLean to comment on death as a shaper of social psyche.

No details of the New York City murder are mentioned. The singer adjourns to a bar, pumps coins into a jukebox, and dedicates each song played to the late great Johnny Ace. The cycle of death is universal.

It is complete from Ace to Lennon. It should be clear that while Jeff Pike feels that the passing of rock era artists somehow marks the end of rock music, it is the music itself that sustains the era, defines death images, and even provides immortality to a small group of performers. Check CD sales. Even Frank Zappa grins from the grave via reissued recordings.

Voices are no longer stilled by death. Carol Williams. Thomas Inge. Chicago: Chicago Review Press,pp. Baucom, John Q. Bird, Donald Allport, Stephen C. Holder, and Diane Sears. Booth, Stanley.

Burns, Gary. Cohen, Norm. Colman, Stuart. Poole, Dorset, England: Blandford Press, Cott, Jonathan and Christine Doudna eds.

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9 thoughts on “America Today - Tupelo Chain Sex - Spot The Difference (Vinyl, LP)

  1. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of "Spot The Difference" on Discogs. Everything Releases Artists Labels. Advanced Search America Today: B3: The Revolution Will Be Televised: B4: Matrix / Runout (Runout B): SLM A - X 1 - 2 Precision TUPELO CHAIN SEX. Other Versions. Recommendations. Reviews.

  2. Tupelo Chain Sex - Spot The Difference () vinyl-rip (44,1KHz/16bit) | artwork | flac tracks | no cue | | mb New Wave Graphic artist Art Chantry called Tupelo Chain Sex's second album one of the " best fucking lp's I've ever heard in my life". When the group first entered the Los Angeles music scene, the Los Angeles Times called the group "bizarre" and went on to.

  3. Shop for Vinyl, CDs and more from Glenn Feit at the Discogs Marketplace. Explore. Discover. Explore All; Trending Releases Tupelo Chain Sex: Tupelo Chain Sex - Spot The Difference ‎ (LP, Album) Selma Record Company: SRLP US:

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  5. But, for now, he’s content with the vinyl company he keeps. “The only difference between men and boys is not their age, but the price of their toys,” he said. [email protected]

  6. The two official records he did with Tupelo Chain Sex, "Spot the Difference" and "Ja-Ja-Jazz", where issued on the Selma Records (San Francisco, CA). One of the greatest performances I've ever seen was TCS with Sugarcane Harris circa

  7. We are a locally family owned and operated business in Tupelo, MS supplying you with all the vinyl & shirts needed for your at home hobby or business. (8) Making people happy is what we do! Operating as usual. 07/20/ Toms of new screen prints in!!! $6 each and can go on cotton or poly blends. 🏻 .

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