Honey, Dont You Love Me Any More - Louis Armstrong And His Orchestra - Louis Armstrong (Vinyl, LP)

Scott just stares at him. Charlie takes a drink of Sambuca. The hospice is on seven. Shall I call a priest? A rabbi maybe? Youve done enough. The Doctor bows out. Scott winces, grabbing his back. Charlie pops it. Scott gives him another pill. Chinese-ish muzak twinkling appropriately. Scott stands by Marys side. What the fuck? You ready? He calls down. Charlie looks to Mary. Are you ready? Charlie reaches for it as it fades. He falls heavily to the floor.

He gets up. Jesus Christ. Scott stares at Charlie, giving him every chance. Here is what makes a life, dahlinge -- such moments, and the choices we make within them.

Charlies eyes flash pure helplessness. We choose. Charlie leaves the room. Or not. Who do we become if we do not do choose, if we do not do the thing that life itself is made of? Like in that Star Trek episode. Charlie feels his face. Charlie looks down at his stomach. Took a powder, eh, Charlie? Shes her normal self. A lovely woman in her 50s who should have a long time yet to live. I always knew. When you were young. Now youve got so much fear, Charlie. Meeting Greg, and leaving your Dad.

Then meeting Scott and leaving Greg. I could never get the sequences right. And p. For the better. Mary Baker thinks. Got it. And thinks. It came to me. WOMAN is inside. Going up? And the door opens. The one Ive got I dont want it to be it.

Charlie follows with a cell phone, making the call. Marys sweatpants fall down around her ass. Its not a pretty sight. Its a big and affecting laugh. Come here. Charlie smiles Okay, then. I love you, Charlie. Have fun in Bucharest. Mary Baker gets in the elevator and the doors close. No, we dont have any books on Bucharest. You know why? Because no one from there can read or write is why. All they can do is have sex with child prostitutes and get AIDS. Oh wait. They can also harvest organs like nobodys business.

Its world capital of that shit. Nadia whats-her-face and all? Its super pretty and they shoot all the pornos there. Id like less dumb-ass information. Wheres your head at? Im off at Bring a bottle. She doesnt notice. He reaches into an old winter boot and pulls out a KEY. A GIRL is asleep. He watches her until he hears a FART. Charlie laughs.

Melissa wakes up and sees him. Theres a GUY there. Charlie doesnt laugh. He goes. Melissa comes after him. Go home. Forget it. You love that I call you Charles. No more. Hes Ted. TED Everything cool? My name is. Dont go to bed. Forget what she said.

Stay here instead. Do not go to bed. Not back where you far Melissa tries to keep a straight face. Okay, Ted? Who gives a shit. Give us a minute. Ted blushes. Hey, bro! TED Enough! Melissa turns Ted toward the bedroom. She whispers in his ear. Ted glares at Charlie, and goes. Coming here being funny. Youre not funny, Charles. With the AIDS and the organ harvesting? Its the place for me. Its supposed. All you do is sit in your apartment and do nothing. Fucking do something for once.

Like Godzilla. I see. Well, Melissa. I had a nice time being your boyfriend for a while even though all we did was fight and you made me cry when it was over. He offers his hand to shake. She hugs him.

He pulls back. I myself had sex tonight. Not by myself. It was me, along with another individual. A girl. He wears a suit. He reaches an office, knocks. A woman, JAN, is inside. Shes happy. Are you serious? Effing nailed it! Never cease to amaze. Save Secure Backup is my crowning achievement.

JAN Whoa. I told you you came back from bereavement too soon. Take the week. Dont do anything rash. JAN Thats rash, Charlie. Its something Ive got to do. Being paperless and all. JAN Dont talk crazy, Charlie. Charlie and Scott are bellied up. Scott lifts a shot of Sambuca. Wherever the hell. They drink. Charlie looks a little piqued.

SCOTT contd. Charlie nods We did the right thing. I know it. Look how sad, dahlinge. The poor soul. We want so badly to believe he does the right thing for himself. But how can we, when we know how it ends for him? I will tell you how -- because of love. We may comfort ourselves knowing that love awaits him. He tries to push the man back, but he wakes. Hes got high gray hair and the bluest eyes. Never mind. Istvan touches Charlies face.

The eyes. You look bad. What is wrong Scott cries. Charlie goes. I am sorry for you. My wife died many years time ago. I have never had another woman since. But I see your point. Ur Isten! I dont go to Bucharest! Were going to Budapest. I take another flight to Bucharest. I am in Bucharest one time.

Never again. Charlie takes out a BOOK. You do not like to speak with me. No trouble for me. Should you not want to know what I am doing in Chicago? Why an old Magyar man is going to there?

Magyar is Hungarian word for Hungarian. See, you can learn something by talking. Im curious. He sets it atop his. So she send me to Chicago to visit a game with the Cubbies Istvans blue eyes brighten and his face beams. Charlie smiles. Weeping happily. I mean, you live in Hungary. Jack Brickhouse and the Cubbies on the black market and we listen together under the blankets for fear of being caught by secret police. We are, how do you say, long time suffering.

Always an invasion or occupation, always beaten in the wars. We are the heartbreak people, but our character is always strong. Same as the Cubbies. May I show to you something incredible? Istvan puts it on and smiles. You think she will love it? This is what I thought! Who wouldnt. Istvan is asleep, leaning on Charlies shoulder again.

Charlie sleeps too. He wakes. Istvan still leans on him. He gently tries to move him. Somethings wrong. Istvans face is ashen.

Charlie tries to shake him. Oh shit. Can someone This man is-People begin to stir. I think hes, um, I dont know. He was fine. Rigor mortis. Charlie looks sick.

Youll alarm the others. Is there a doctor on board? They look back at the body. At Charlie. He remains in his seat by the window. Trapped, stunned. After a bit, Flight Attendant approaches Charlie. This man is from there and it really does simplify things. We are sorry for the inconvenience. Well keep them coming. Theres a dead person sitting next to me. Lets try to make the best of it, shall we? Charlies had enough drinks to be drunk.

Flight Attendant comes over. Youll have to climb over, I suppose. She goes. Charlie stands and tries to squeeze, but the person in front of Istvan is reclining and asleep. Hes getting up. Istvans Dont You Love Me Any More - Louis Armstrong And His Orchestra - Louis Armstrong (Vinyl moves.

Charlie, come in to here. Charlie looks around to see if someone is talking to him. Theyre not. Charlie lifts the sheet. Istvan smiles at him. I tell her you are going to Bucharest. She smiles for you. I see also my wife and she made some sex with me. It is my daughter -- perhaps you will give her my gift, and tell her she is my deshem lny.

Istvan is gray and dead again. Charlie comes out from under the sheet. Everyones looking at him like hes a freak. Passengers disembark, moving around Istvan like hes, well, a dead body. Charlie is stuck there. The official takes Istvans bag from the floor. It is belonging to me. Ha ha. Its What? It was the dead mans funny hat. The official takes the hat.

Charlie turns to the passenger. Im not poor, I aint got to work in the elds till the sun goes down, and I sure as hell aint leaving town on the morning train. Given all thiswhy arent I happy?

Why, given that my life varies so much from the archetypical bluesman, do I feel something deep inside me move when Lightnin Hopkins tells me hes got to pick cotton come the morning?

If I cry, I know deep down that I dont cry for himwhen we cry we always cry for ourselves: but what the hell have I got to bawl over? The blues self-consciously arises out of conditions of misery and suffering and, arguably, the need to give an account of thiseven at great cost.

In a interview with the Los Angeles Times Sam Lightnin Hopkins said, when discussing how his music came from the depths of his soul, Im killin myself to tell them how it is.

This paper seeks to explore how music initially forged on the anvil of human suffering comes to represent, even for the more socio-economically advantaged, a means of engaging with our inner-most dis-ease and anxiety. Further to this, we might suggest that appreciation of the blues has a political edge. For white listeners it can be a distancing of ourselves from the crimes of the slave-owner and the overseer.

That is, a conscious siding with the oppressed. Identication with the blues can form a symbolic component of our response to the key political question: which side are you on? While the blues might enable us to engage with our dis-ease, and situate ourselves socio-politically, lingering doubts remain as to claims too numerous to mentionbut see the white Bluesmen in Scorseses Blues documentary for starters that it is nothing to do with race or color, its just about feeling the blues.

From the notion that to play the blues, you gotta pay your dues, to debates that I have no intention of getting into here about whether white men can sing the blues4context matters in the blues.

Even if you believe. Poverty, oppressionbut more than anything the pains of the heart in the face of love denied. While we may not suffer from most of these, I would imagine that any of us with a pulse would feel ourselves as able to recognize something in songs about romantic abandonment, jealousy, passion, and love. Even acknowledging this, the troubles of the blues are not really identical with mine.

We might even say that unhappiness is never sharedciting what we might call the Anna Karenina principle. The opening line of Tolstoys novel being: All happy families are happy alike, all unhappy families are unhappy in their own way. How, though, can we move from this to a sense of the blues as expressing something like a kind of generic dis-ease within our lives?

I will return to this idea shortly. But rst I want to briey explore the tension that can often exist especially, but not only, in white Europeans such as myself in appreciation of the blues. One approach, which I do not see as tenable, but which deserves a moments attention, is the accusation that the white, European appreciator of the blues is in the grip of some type of false consciousness: that what they derive their real underlying pleasure from is a variant form of racist Schadenfreude.

This would not be at a conscious level, not a form of Phew Im sure glad it isnt me whose gotta live like that. Rather, one might suggest that it is an internalized process, a kind of rather patronizing enjoyment of the pleasures of the primitive.

Listening to the blues, I can almost imagine what it would be like to experience one of those things. I am not going to follow it up here, but many critics of the phenomenon of world music see such a process very much at work in that somewhat constructed genrethe name itself as implying a catch-all term for nonWestern musiclumping it all together and ignoring its internal differences and, indeed, tensions.

I may be doing a little of that generalizing myself with respect to the blues, but I shall try to keep it to a minimum. I do not want to suggest that this is what lies behind my, or anyone elses, appreciation of the blues, but maybe we can use such a reection as the starting point for some thoughts on how we partake of suffering when we hear or sing the blues.

Perhaps we could suggest that some jouissance is found at the heart of the others miserya nugget of real, true-to-life suffering that seems juicy and authentic, in contrast to our own constructed, synthetic lives.

The Real Thing This might be equated with what Slavoj Ziek describes although he tends to use it in a somewhat technical, Lacanian, sense as a passion for the real the notion that in much of the developed West, we feel that somehow our lives are not properly real.

In response to coffee without caffeine, beer without alcohol, we are after something that is genuine and real. Whether in reality TV, amateur pornography, the rise of extreme sports, or the ethos of the movie Fight Club, we are desperate to feel something. The blues singer seems to have misery to spareauthentic, grounded, down-home, handmade suffering and for our palates, used to articial stimulation, a little of this misery can go a long way. So, the rst serious point here is that the blues may stand, particularly for the European listener, as a type of symbolic authenticityit is the real thing.

The blues is not the bleating of the bourgeoisie, but a genuine cry from the depths of the human heartirreducible, unmediated by over-analysis, and genuine. Now, I want to move on shortly but there is something vaguely disturbingto me at leastabout this idea of the genuine.

All musical. I am tempted to mention John Fahey here and his view accurate or not that by releasing his blues music, partly, under the name of Blind Joe Death rather than his own name he would gain more success.

The idea here is, perhaps, that to sing the blues, you gotta know them. To know them, you gotta have lived them I will return shortly to the notion of authenticity. This point would be even more sustainable were there no successful white, European, non-poor blues artists.

We might suggest that such performers are acceptable primarily because they free us of any possible guilt that might undermine our pleasurebut I think that this, although containing a slight nugget of truth in certain casesis probably unfair as a general rule. The reason that I could, had I any musical talent that is, sing the blues is because, when it comes down to itand this is a return to my opening concernwe all know the blues, because our own livesno matter how comfortableare touched by blues.

Suffering and Redemption Ive got plenty of food on the tablestill gonna die; youve got a nice car still gonna get old; Ive got a good woman waiting at homestill gonna get ill, get old and die, thus deriving all my comfort, wealth, and supercial pleasure of their shineof their meaning.

Hell, Im feeling blue already. But I think we ignore something rather essential about the blues if we take ourselves too far down this rather dark and miserable pathway.

To some extent it may be fair to read the blues as an existential howl, the human spirit crying out in the face of a cold, heartless, and purposeless universe, but there is surely more. As the opening quote of the paper indicates, the blues often celebrate life as much as they bemoan its vicissitudes. While acknowledging this point, I shall leave others to concentrate on the joyousas I want to consider the blues as an engagement with suffering, but in a way that is more than purely a cry of anguish.

There are at least two possible approaches here. We could consider in some sense the blues as a means of redemptionand I will come to that shortly. However, I rst want to consider blues in religious context. Often we have a. While we can appreciate the potential redemptive power of the blues whether or not this emerges from the actual suffering itself is an interesting question as a transport to salvic liberation from the limits and shortcomings of this mortal world whether via religion or notwe can also hear in the blues the cry of the damned.

Now, what could we read into this choice? Why might the archetypal bluesman choose the path of the damned? Maybe they are just bad: Bad to the bone although this phrase was popularized by white blues artist, George Thorogood.

This is a powerful and evocative phrase. It gives a sense of existing outside the borders of redemptive possibilityand ties in with all the usual outsider motifs that run through blues music. A second reading might be that of the rejection of an uncaring God. When we see the early blues we see it arise out of a people made abject by slaveryby people who have undergone trauma that is, mercifully, hard for us to imaginebeyond our borders of experience.

Having seen what they have seen, known what they know, lost what they have lostalone, penniless, and homeless, what indeed can they be said to owe God who has paid them out so badly? But perhaps we ought to be wary of going too far down this route; the blues is, at least not most of the time, not a variety of bleak theological critique. Nonetheless the blues is often situated within a theological context.

Given what I have said here, how are we to read the theologically ambivalentalthough humanly direct and movingcry of Lord, have mercy. The obvious parallel is with the crucied Christcrying out as to why he has been abandonedlike the African American slave left alone by God in his hour of need. So, there are a number of ways of reading the blues as a response to sufferingbut how does it reach across the Atlantic to touch me in the way it does?

Maybe we come to a view, then, that our appreciation of the blues is a process that exoticizes the universal and mundane, in a sense phenomena of sufferingof mortality?

This could be seen to occur such that the specic hardships of the blues performer come to stand for universal human. We might argue that the blues is a displaced form of reection on mortality. Perhaps reection is the wrong wordwe might see it more as a range of complex responses to nitudea nitude we all share. Blues and Justication I want to move on from this notion though to look at the idea of how the blues might be seen as a means of justifying experience.

One, I imagine relatively standard, way to read the blues is as an alienated community, or members thereof, justifying their existence. This would be to say that by giving voice to experience, it nds a means of validating that experience and seeking to come to terms with it.

However, we can broaden this notion. In Nausea, Sartres anti-hero Antoine Roquentin nds his last hope in his existential distress in the voice of a jazz-blues record.

So you can justify your existence? Just a little? I feel extraordinarily intimidated. It isnt that I have much hope. But I am like a man who is completely frozen after a journey through the snow and who suddenly comes into a warm room. I imagine he would remain motionless near the door, still feeling cold, and that slow shivers would run over the whole of his body.

Some of these days Youll miss me honey After this he makes a resolution to writeto nd his own way to justify his existence. To abandon his historical project as, an existent can never justify the existence of another existentand nd a means of selfexpression that allows him to accept his own being.

To understand how he comes to this, I will quote just one more sectionthat preceding the one a moment agothat leads him to the view that you can, somehow, justify your existence: She sings. That makes two people that are saved: the Jew and the Negress. Perhaps they thought they were lost right until the very end, drowned. Yet nobody could think about me as I think about them, with this gentle feeling. Nobody, not even Anny. For me they are a little like dead people, a little like heroes of novels; they have cleansed themselves of the sin of existing.

Not completely, of coursebut as much as any man can. This idea suddenly bowls me over, because I didnt even hope for that any more. I feel something timidly brushing against me and I dare not move because I am afraid it might go away. Something I didnt know any more: a sort of joy. This discovery is not only a moment of great poignancy in the novel, but for me encapsulates something of the bluesand leads me closer to an understanding of why the blues moves me like it does.

Previously in the novel, Roquentin was struck down by the nauseaparalyzed by the pointlessness and contingency of existence at the counter of the cafe.

This reverie of overwhelmed sensation is only escaped from by musicby the same record which snaps him out of it. We could read this as a form of existential grounding. In light of the existentialist slogan that existence precedes essence, we can see the blues as a form of raw beingmusically as a form which is often spartan or basic, and in communion with raw emotion. Whether the simplicity of the blues form contributes directly to its ability to commune, without the mediation of complexity, with something deep and almost primal within us is a question for musicologists.

However, the simple frame might be seen as contributing to the way in which a listener is transported across a world of boundaries to a place where a man or woman stands aloneat the crossroadsnot doing, but just being.

Return to Reality Be it stripped down bare, or lush, the blues seems to standboth for acionados and in the general cultureas a symbol of genuine human emotions.

The blues can be seen as connecting us to something deeper than what we do, wear, buy, or, even, think. This returns us to the aforementioned notion. It is not just the authentic product, but the authentic experienceauthentic being. Is much of what passes for the blues, however, not a false realnot the constructed real of the reality TV show? What does it mean to make a distinction between authentic and somehow contrived or manufactured blues?

That this is a recurrent issue in many types of music is interesting. People often complain that modern groups for example boy bands are manufactured, and that they havent earned the right to their success. The issue of authenticity is both a common concern and lyrical pre-occupation in hip-hop.

Internally the genre still has an ongoing concern with the fake from the authentic, genuine, andtherebyvalid performers. There are many signicant differences between the blues and hip-hop, but it is notable that both genres of predominantly black music are surrounded by questions of authenticity and a desire, often by non-black appreciators, to ensure that they get the real thing. Further, there are concerns over the way the blues has, in the eyes of some, been domesticatedand we could even import, a little out of context, Max Webers notion from the sociology of religion of the routinization of charisma hereleading to a notion that the further the blues moves from its roots of oppression the more formulaic it becomes and hence its authenticity diminishes.

Webers view that as a religious or other radical or revolutionary leader dies, organizations or movements seek, often structural, ways of maintaining their momentum and agenda, might nd a home here in the notion that there is a danger that as the blues moves forward it becomes just another genreanother choice in the lifestyle supermarket of choice and branding.

Do I really like the blues just because it is consistent with my personal brand-identity prole? Given this worry, can there be new blues? Is it not better to cede it as a historical genre? I like to believe not. The claim that context is critical, in nding meaning in the blues, should not lead us to believe that new performers are somehow inherently inauthentic. If we nd work that is really a copy of the older formswith themes that ape the past, surely we should eschew it for work that seeks to engage with contemporary contexts, with.

Some of these are perennial, others more subject to the seasonbut, maybe sadly, there will never be a shortage of reasons to be blue. Some might argue that older material is as relevant today as ever in that it deals with timeless themes such as the search for satisfaction, selfexpression, and human dignity and much of it is. Nonetheless, many of us might prefer a blues that speaks to the age from which it originatesthat treats the genre not as a museum piece, but as an active engagement with the contemporary context.

The blues is indeed steeped in tradition, but is not a key thread of that tradition acting as a living commentary on the time of its composition, and of, to steal an old Quaker phrase, speaking the Truth to Power? Now, I do not want to suggest that people seek oppression just for the sake of their art. To do so, just so as to feel ones voice to be authentic would be absurd. Surely such a practice is somewhat self-indulgent and may itself be deeply patronizing. In an idea stolen from the realms of theodicy,11 we might learn from sufferingbut it is not there to teach us thingsand we should not seek it for educational purposes!

The Spirit of Blues So, to continue: Yes, the blues has become many things, and I am neither qualied nor inclined to comment in detail on issues of commercialism, exploitation, and purity, but to me there seems to be an element of blues music that runs like a thread through time and tradition. From those early bluesmenpeople like Son House and Lightnin Hopkinsto the white teenager I saw playing blues outside Bristol train station last week, an ineffable trace of the same spirit remains.

This is not to say that this spirit is other-worldly, or that it is ever comprehensible other than via its concrete context. Rather I use the term to denote a person in whose performance we see a genuine attempt to engage with elements of their own nature as limited, mortal, imperfect, and suffering being who recognizes these facts about themselves.

The blues can capture, in a moment via a phrase or picked string, a moment of self-insight thatmediated by contexthas the potential to stir our own often dormant introspective apparatus.

Of course, we needbefore I get too philosophicalto remember that normally we listen to the blues not as historical record, agit-prop, or seeking a trace of the divine, but because we enjoy it in a way that does not require or usually invite further speculation. However, seeing as we have started with the speculation. To return to the Sartre again, Paul Vincent Spade concentrates, in an article on the record in Nausea, on how the recording of the soundunlike its transcriptionhas a certain power to immortalize: but he goes on to nd something particular in the record: The singers wail really does express an exemplary suffering.

It is the suffering of redemption. She is singing that we must take up our cross and follow her, that we too must suffer in rhythm. Some is joyous or rowdy, or crude or any of the shades of human emotion. But when it moves me, at least, the most is when it captures even when not trapped in the grooves of a record or the data of a CDbut live this suffering in rhythm. While on the surface it may sometimes seem to do so, the blues is not a wallowing in misery, and because of the connection with our universal imperfection, it may feel as though it goes beyond the justication of a specic experience of a certain people in a particular place and time, and moves towards something truly sublime.

As I have already indicated, this does not mean we can strip it of context without loss. To say that there is a pure blues13 which is an essentialist essence transcending race, ethnicity, and class is too nave, rather it is through seeing the context that we see the way it can connect with us.

For the blues, any universal is buried deep within the particular. I have mentioned the notion of the blues as redemptive. What does this mean? It is not meant in the sense that blues music can save us from our sins. Rather I mean it in the sense of redeeming or validating elements of our existing. When somebody sings the blues, when they sing them like theyre dying just to tell you how it is, they exist at the frontiers of emotional experience in such a way as to open up the possibility of a self-redeeming, self-justifying being.

At its best, the blues faces up to suffering without sentimentality, without self-pity, and in such a way that it becomes something which is not an escape from life, but rather something which afrms life. And anything life-afrming enriches us all.

Despite the misery, the suffering, and the heartache, the blues can bring us towards more than just an acceptance of our nite, mortal selvesit can.

My paraphrasing of this oft-repeated assertion. Paul Garon has addressed this in some detail, both in his book Blues and the Poetic Spirit, and in when he wrote for Living Blues Magazine.

He is a strong advocate of the view that race matters, and that to pretend that it is just about some transcendent spirit of pure music is, frankly, nave andI would contendpotentially rather offensive. The Onion, February 23, Jacques Lacan was a French psychoanalyst whose work in the s marked a return to Freud and whose emphasis on the unconscious helped shape post-structuralism. The record in the book is what Paul Vincent Spade calls a mixture of fact and literary licence.

What is noteworthy, perhaps, is that Tucker was not a negress at all, but a Russian Jew, who grew up in Connecticut.

Nonetheless, due to the style of music she performed, she had been required to wear blackface make-up early in her career.

Shelton Brooks was a black Afro-Canadian, born in Ontario. This is not a term still in current usagewith its strong associations with racist attitudes, I retain only out of concern for the authenticity of the original words. Arguably less now than at any point in its previous, brief history. Some feel slightly disillusioned that a genre once producing social comment from the likes of Public Enemy, KRS-One and even to some degree NWAis now dominated by bling and bragging.

In theology, a theodicy is an attempt to solve the Problem of Evil, which maintains Gods Omnipotence, Omniscience, and Omnibenevolence. As I indicated earlier, if you watch the recent Martin Scorsese blues documentaries, it is notable that a number of middle-aged white blues performers make exactly this claim.

In December at Carnegie Hall, New York City, various artists presented the black musical styles of gospel, blues, and jazz. This From Spirituals to Swing concert charted a route from Christian songs of uplift and protest, through folk music, to the sophistication of instrumental dance music. In Britain, where access to black American music was dominated by recordings into the s, enthusiasts copied records of those genres they so admired, and produced skife, trad jazz, andnotably in the case of the Beatles and the Rolling Stonesa British rock n roll.

Before this impact from recordings there were other inuences, and this survey will suggest that the history of the inuences of African American music in Europe may need to be reconsidered. These inuences were sustained and substantial, but seldom preserved on disc. First, before the late s, when discs of black American music started to appear in British and continental record catalogues, there had been Secondly, performances by black Americans in Britain were notas at Carnegie Hall in a break in the racial barriers or color-line that impinged on the daily lives of all Americans of African descent, but a normal part of social life.

Thirdly, the music of at least one black Briton crossed the Atlantic and had some considerable inuence on Americans. One hundred years ago the majority of Americans of African descent lived in the southern states; all of them knew of slavery times or had relatives who had been slaves.

In Britain considerable sympathy and support had been given to abolitionists and those who had experienced slavery.

For example, Virginia-born Thomas Lewis Johnsons autobiography, Twentyeight Years a Slave, went into eight editions, the rst published in London in and the last in in Bournemouth, where he had settled and where he died in Their presentation of Spirituals was especially well received.

The choir, named the Fisk Jubilee Singers, set off across the Atlantic in a sustained presentation of the music of black Americans in Europe. Their spiritual music, in the Nonconformist Christian tradition, would have been immediately recognized by Mitchells Christian Singers who were to appear at Carnegie Hall in But in the s the music was a revelation in Britain and in Germany, Italy, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. Their rst concert May 6, led the London Times to comment: Though the music is the offspring of wholly untutored minds, and, therefore, may grate upon the disciplined ear, it possesses a peculiar charm.

I never heard anything like it. Music had won them inuential friends including philanthropist Lord Shaftesbury who commented on the choir: coming here in such a spirit, I dont want them to become white, but I have a strong disposition myself to become black.

This may often have been patronizing, but patronage was welcome. At this time racial stereotypes were ill-formed. It could be argued that the Fisk Singers created a stereotype by presenting a music that looked back into the slavery decades. According to one doughty imperialist and superb linguist and artistHarry Johnston, who was in the South thirty years later, the Spirituals tradition was backward-looking.

He was enormously impressed with the beauty of the voices in the singing of Negro men and women at Tuskegee, Hampton, and other centers [sic] of education; but I soon got weary of the verbal rubbish of the hymns, and still more the plantation songs, to which their talent was directed. Admitting that grand opera, which these black students could have sung and played: for he praised their violin, piano, and organ playinghad words and themes nearly as idiotic as the worst hymns, he recommended Gilbert and Sullivan operettas to them.

The Fisk Jubilee Singers numbered ten ineleven inand eight later. All but one had been house-slaves, and thus alert to the manners and expectations of the ruling elite: not untutored. Edmund Watkins, however, had picked cotton and had been whipped in Texas. Loudin, ably assisted by his wife and business manager Harriet Loudin, took the music around the world.

He was to tell audiences of the black experience of slavery, and explain how his people had been sustained by the music during those evil times. As well as public appearances the group sang for private gatherings, and sold many copies of The Story of the Jubilee Singers, with their Songs. A London edition dated is the sixth edition completing fortyfourth thousand. Fresh editions appeared almost yearly, each with photographic portraits of the choir members. It contained songs, with their words.

Pianists and singers all over the country played Spirituals as a consequence. Members of the Fisks took advantage of opportunities that came to them in Britain. Two women studied music when the tour ended inand Isaac Dickerson went to Edinburgh University and settled in London where he became a Christian minister in Plumstead.

He died there inand his funeral was accompanied by Spirituals. Rutling taught music in England, living in Harrogate Yorkshire where he died in With Loudins choir, the book, and the activities of ex-members, the music reached many Britons. Three examples from The Story of the Jubilee Singers would have been known to the performers at Carnegie Hall in The s recordings by Blind Willie Johnson, a mix of blues and spirituals in sound but the latter in intent, included Keep Your Lamps Trimmed and Burning.

The words are very similar to those in the Fisk book the melody is differenthinting at a shared folk base, probably Biblical in origin. The Fisk book also has Trouble in Mind. The Yardbirds album popularly referred to as Roger the Engineer, a recording rst issued in the United States as Over Under Sideways Down, sent repercussions throughout Europe and the States and established Beck as one of the most electric of artists.

After Jeff Beck nished up his month tenure with the Yardbirds inproducer Mickie Most signed him to a management deal, thinking that Beck, the best looking and most intriguing member of the band, would have a career as a pop artist.

How wrong he was! Not only did the introverted Beck have no desire to be a pop star, he also had much grander musical ambitions, most of which had to do with wreaking utter havoc with his Les Paul. The band released two albumsTruth and BeckOla that became musical touchstones for hard rockers in the years to come. Id been red from the group I was in and the group Woody was in, the Birds, they formed the Part Seems so basically we were all unemployed.

Jeff Beck: I was lurking in this club one night and uh I think we were the last two people laughs in there. Stewart: I came up to you and said are you a taxi driver and you said No, I play the guitar. You said are you a bouncer and I said No, Im a singer. Jeff Beck: It was a London Club, where all sorts of things go on at three oclock in the morning. With their brazen and deafening reworkings of blues songs and vocal and guitar interplay, Beck and the boys established the blueprint for heavy metal.

But neither of the bands records was particularly successful, and the band tended to ght regularly, especially on their frequent tours of the United States.

The behavior signaled doom for the band. Beck disbanded the group; he suffered a serious car accident in Beck again dissolved the group and formed a power trio with bassist Tim Bogert and drummer Carmine Appice, which released Beck, Bogert and Appice In the meantime, Jeff spent much of his time building and tinkering with his hot rod collection and working occasionally on other peoples musical projects.

Pleased with the results, he continued on to play 10 dates on the ARMS tour of Beck also teamed with his former lead singer, Rod Stewart, on two separate occasions in and Flash featured Stewarts stirring vocals on People Get Ready as Beck furthered his distance from jazz and began to turn up some hard rock heat on his wildest, wang bar-infected solo yet on Ambitious. A guitar can take you wherever you want it to go, Beck told me in Guitar for the Practicing Musician.

He followed that up the very next year with Wired, a collaboration with fusion specialist Jan Hammer, former keyboardist for the Mahavishnu Orchestra. Both all-instrumental albums were critical and popular successes and remain two of the top-selling guitar instrumental albums of all time. After the Hammer tour, Beck retired for three years, working on his hobby, car racing and hot rods in his estate outside of London.

He returned in with another Hammer work, There and Back, and again ve years after that with Nile Rodgers of Chic on the slick Flash.

He toured with Stevie Ray Vaughan in and retired, sort of, once again. He returned to the studio in backed by the Big Town Playboys to record Crazy Legs, a tribute to seminal rockabilly artist Gene Vincent and his guitarist Cliff Gallup.

The recording took just six weeks to record and mix, but Beck totally immersed himself in the work of Gene Vincent for that time. Beck played his latter day bebop to the nines and he thoroughly captured the detailed technique of Gallups archetypal leads. Six years later he released Who Else!

But that album, released to a great deal of publicity and acclaim, seemed to rejuvenate Beck standards. Inhe released Jeff and hit the road on a coast-to-coast tour with blues legend B.

King on the Twelfth Annual B. King Music Festival. The next summer he toured the United Kingdom for the rst time in nearly 20 years, based in part on securing his fourth Grammy for Best Instrumental for the track Plan B. Becks resurgence continued through the rest of the decade, with a new band, a tour of Japan, and a new album, entitled, Ofcial Bootleg. Inhe appeared on the popular.

Jeff also had another very high prole appearance, this one with Guns N Roses on a Paris stage. He showed up for a rehearsal with the band, but an excruciating case of tinnitus, an ear afiction Jeff has had for decades, prevented him from following through on the guest spot. In his earliest work, hes credited with bringing to prominence, and popularizing something no less seminal than feedback and distortion. At the time, in the early s, guitars sounded clean, bright, and janglyat least in the bands of the British Invasion.

Or they sounded bluesy, ala Muddy Waters and Bo Diddley and their landmark electric work of the LP) decade. In his work with seminal bluesrock act the Yardbirds, a post he kept for a very short time as Eric Claptons replacement, he demonstrated a penchant for experimentation and pushed the band into directions that would open the door to psychedelic rock. Becks guitar experiments with fuzz tone, feedback, and distortion jolted British rock forward with a bold dropkick, punching a psychedelic time-clock, and evincing world-music inuences.

In addition, the Yardbirds began serious experiments with things like adapting Gregorian chant and world-music inuences Still Im Sad, Turn into Earth, Hot House of Omagarashid, Farewell, Ever Since the World Began and various European folk styles into their blues and rock rooted music, and this gained them a new reputation among the hipster underground even as their commercial appeal had begun already to wane.

One of Becks signatures as a player is his canny sense of pitch. Whammy bars and Stratocasters dont typically Music may have been one of Becks earliest pasgo very well together; the whammy sions but it has always shared space with a love of hot often throws the guitar out of tune.

The majority of Becks cars are Fords, rously, creating everything from nosethough over the years there have been Model Ts and a diving bombs to subtle, perfectly hammered coupe. He houses the majority of pitched harmonic melodies. He loves tinkering with dynamic sense of timing. He regularly them himself, customizing and refurbishing them, and plays either slightly behind the beat or he can often be seen in England at the bigger rod runs slightly ahead of it, and the irregularity held in the United Kingdom.

He also exercises a sweeping began devoting more time to his eet of hot rods. I like legato style phrasing, especially in his the studio because its delicate; youre working for ballads, which creates intensity and sound.

I like the garage because chopping up lumps of melody. Other Beck quirks, and there are The garage is a more dangerous place though. Ive many, include a tendency to pre-bent never almost been crushed by a guitar, but I cant say notes, or bends when theyre least the same about one of my Corvettes.

He possesses an immense kind of courage and an impeccable. He chooses notes quite unexpectedly and makes them work in nearly any situation, regardless of the key. He is quite creative when it comes to creating tonal variety by switching pickups and manipulating his tone and volume controls as well.

Although Jeff is known as a solo artist, throughout his career he has worked with top producers and musicians who have helped to bring out the best in him. Working on the Blow by Blow album, George Martin brought a certain Beatles-like lightheartedness which made it easier to play in the studio. I would be trying to do these really difcult bits and he would say, Jeff, you played like an angel this morning but now you suck.

Just take a break! I love that cause I hate to be patronized about my playing. I like to have input from Joe Public or from someone I respect if they can explain what they dont like about what Im doing. Whats lacking in a lot of people is that they live in their own little world in a vacuum and eventually the door slams shut and they freeze to death www.

He possesses a few vintage instruments as well, including a Stratocaster once owned by the late Steve Marriott.

The rst time Jeff Beck saw a Strat, still his instrument of choice, it was hanging in the window of a music shop on Charing Cross Road. He was with a bandmate from the DelTones on a day theyd skipped school. They hopped a bus and went looking around guitar shops. From the upper deck of the bus he saw the Strat in the shop, went barreling down the stairs, knocked the conductor out of the way and jumped off the bus.

It was a sunburst Strat and a blond Tele with an ebony ngerboard. Of course, at 14, Beck didnt have any money to speak of, but the clerk let him play to his hearts content. During his career, Jeff has played both Strats and Les Pauls, generally going with whichever style suits the music best. With his louder, lower end, three-piece power rock sound, he opted for the Les Paul. He was pleased with the fat midrange and the richness of the higher notes and planned to form a three-piece so it made sense.

He also enjoyed the thick neck of the Les Paul. He credits that initial impression the Les Paul made on him to watching Eric Clapton, though he opted for his own setup in terms of amplication.

The Jeff Beck Signature Strat is well known for the thickness and weight of the neck. He was nding that the necks of most Strats were too thin and his hand ached soon after starting to play. After he played the weightier Les Paul, he proposed the idea of a thicker neck to the people at Fender.

They nearly doubled the size of the traditional Strat neck for the Beck Signature model. This surf green warhorse is named Little Richard; the rock n roll legend signed his name on the body in mile-high letters. By the Yardbirds era, Beck had abandoned the Strat he started on. He experimented with a few Telecasters before settling on a Fender Esquire as his main guitar.

He played his Esquire through two Vox AC30 combo amps. Jimi told him he was playing on strings that were too thin. At the time, Becks strings were as thin as he could get.

But since that encounter with Jimi, his string gauges have been rising ever since. Now hes starting at. It was also Hendrix who rekindled Becks interest in the Strat.

For much of the early s, he uctuated between Strats, Teles, and Les Pauls. Becks right-hand technique is highly idiosyncratic. Hes one of the only true rock guitarists who picks with his bare ngers rather than use a pick. When the tailpiece of the Strat is properly set up, for me, I can feel the spring balance, he says. Theres a balance between the tension of the strings and the counter-tension of the springs on the back.

I have it set so theres just enough tension to bend the arm up a whole step. Thats about it. If the bridge is leaning forward too much because of string tension, then youre not going to get the downward press you need. To accommodate Becks vigorous string bending, a double roller nut was devised to stop the extraneous ringing noise and help the intonation. And, over the years, he has also used a variety of amps, often with a wall of cabinets. For his now legendary The Fire and the Fury tour with the late Stevie Ray Vaughan inhe went a different direction.

I had a couple of Fender Twins and that was it, Beck says. Stevie couldnt believe it. He had a huge stack with about 15 different amps, all gaffer-taped to a rolling platform. At the end of each nights gig, wed alternate between him coming on to play with me and my band, and me going on with his band. The volume coming out of those amps was so unbelievable. And every night hed say, You know man, Im talking to my guys about getting your setup.

And I said, Im talking to my guys about getting yours. He sounded amazing Di Perna, I dont understand why some people will only accept a guitar if it has an instantly recognizable guitar sound, says Beck. Finding ways to use the same guitar people have been using for 50 years to make sounds that no one has heard before is truly what gets me off.

I love it when people hear my music but cant gure out what instrument Im playing. What a cool compliment uncredited biography, www. Ive just got one head. As long as I spend time dialing in sound through the side lls on the stage, and give the front of the house guy plenty of time to dial out the nasty zz, its been ne. Although I am going to change up and go back to all four cabinets and two tops after the B. King tourcause thats not for B.

They went berserk on me cause it was too loud on stage at one point. It just disappears into a country sound, laughs which is ne if youre playing country. But if you want powerful attack to replace a piece band, you need to be louder. Have the capacity to be loud St. James, Adam, Jeff Beck, guitar.

Beck also uses a Snarling Dog wah-wah pedal. Thats a radical pedal. I mean its one or two steps further than any wah pedal ever known.

Its got an active circuit, as opposed to just a battery-powered toggle pot. So it kicks in a lot more dB and a lot more sweep and a lot more depth variable in the wah wah itself. You can preset it so it wont take your head off, which is good St. James, Jeff Beck: Crazy Fingers. Di Perna, Alan. Fender Players Club. Hes Beck. Guitar for the Practicing Musician, April James, Adam. Jeff Beck. Chuck Berry Chuck Berrys music transcends generations and helped to dene the experience of American youth.

Goode, Maybellene, and Memphis that have become anthems to music fans and cornerstones of American popular culture. He established rock n roll as a musical form and united the worlds of black and white through his music. He is also, arguably, the most important guitarist in rock n roll history.

His style, a souped-up hybrid of LP), jump blues, Delta blues, and boogie-woogie piano, has inspired and inuenced generations of rock musicians from the moment they rst heard it, from Elvis, the Beatles, and the Rolling Stones in the late s, to second-generation rockers like the Who and the Beach Boys, and on up to the White Stripes in the s. Not bad for a convicted car thief and former cosmetician. He electried popular music, literally and guratively, and his primal chords formed the transition from rhythm and blues to rock n roll.

He was also the rst to dene the classic subjects of rock n roll in songwriting, including girls, school, and cars. Oddly enough, this happened when Berry was in his thirties. Berry gave rock n roll an archetypal character in Johnny B. Goode and was responsible for several inimitable stage antics, including his patented duck walk and playing the guitar behind his head and between his legs. All the while, his repertoiresnot only the hits, but lesser-known songs like Little Queenie and Let It Rockwere being absorbed by eager apprentices on the other side of the ocean.

He was the rst great poet laureate of rock and roll. Goode: His Complete 50s Chess Recordings. He made the format for rock and roll from the lyric content to the guitar riffs to the rhythms. Berry was awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award inand in he was among the inaugural inductees to the newly christened Rock n Roll Hall of Fame. The next year, a half dozen of his songs were counted in that same magazines list of The Greatest Songs of All Time, including Johnny B.

In fact, it is hard to imagine how rock n roll would have evolved had Chuck decided to stay at one of his odd jobs, as a carpenter, a painter, or a hairdresser, rather than pick up, and stay with, his beloved Gibson guitar. Louis on October 18, in a middle-class neighborhood of the city known as The Ville.

He was the third child in a family of six. His father was a contractor and a deacon of the Antioch Baptist Church and his mother served as a school principal. Because he enjoyed a relatively comfortable upbringing, he pursued music with condence from an early point in his life. He sang from a young age, emulating the smooth vocals of his rst idol, Nat King Cole. He listened heavily to the blues, namely Muddy Waters, but it was still objectionable to perform the blues in front of a middle-class audience.

At the time, blues was considered unsavory, as it clearly divided white and black audiences. But the young Berrys performance received hearty applause for taking the risk, and his success emboldened him, encouraging him to pursue performing. Unfortunately, the law interfered with his plans. Inat 18, before he could graduate, he was arrested and convicted of armed robbery after taking a joy ride with his friends to Kansas City, Missouri. As he tells it, Berrys automobile broke down and he agged a passing car for assistance, using a non-functional pistol.

The car-jacking victim phoned the police and soon Berry was in prison for the rst time, serving a three-year sentence. While there, Berry joined a gospel group and boxed briey before being released on his twenty-rst birthday in Berry took up the guitar more seriously after that, in ; he learned the critical rhythm changes and blues chords that would enable him to play most of the popular songs on the radio at the time.

A friend of his, a local jazz guitarist named Ira Harris, showed him techniques on the instrument that would become the foundation of Berrys original sound.

He set out playing on a four-string tenor guitar, but switched to a sixstring around A year after his release from prison, Berry married Themetta Suggs and began a series of miscellaneous jobs: as a janitor at the Fisher Body auto assembly plant, trained to be Dont You Love Me Any More - Louis Armstrong And His Orchestra - Louis Armstrong (Vinyl hairdresser at the Poro School, freelanced as a photographer, assisted his father as a carpenter, and began his career as a musician.

During this time, he continued playing the guitar and developing a reputation around St. Inhe performed in a house band at a local club, whose songs ranged from blues to ballads and from calypso to country.

The next year he joined a second, more legitimate touring band called the Sir Johns Trio, after their sax player called in sick for an important New Years Eve gig at a popular East St. Louis venue. Berry jumped at the chance and made the most of his break. That night, he tore it up with a country, hillbilly number in a bluesy style that knocked the audience out. At the time, country and western music and the sounds of Hank Williams were all over the radio, especially in the Midwest, so Berry, eager to capitalize, delved into the sound of hillbilly guitar.

His bands black fans thought it inscrutable for a young black guitar player to be strumming out hillbilly chords, but they started dancing to it. At the same time. Berrys white audience loved the country genre, so they started grooving as well. From that point, at 26, he began to attract the rst multiracial audience in pop. Berry, an ebullient, often silly showman, began stepping up his stage antics as well, as did other members of the Sir Johns Trio band.

This included pianist Johnnie Johnson, whose own style on the ivories was almost as inuential to pianists like Jerry Lee Lewis as Berry was to guitar players. Johnson and Berry traded licks back and forth and performed gymnastic stage maneuvers. Crowds ate it up. In retrospect, critics have made the case that Berry and the Sir Johns Trio served as a prototype of the rst rock n roll band. Chuck Berry took the band over as front man and it soon became known as the Chuck Berry Combo.

On a fortuitous night at a West Side club, Berry met one of his idols, Muddy Waters, then a recording artist for. Waters heard Berrys sound, and despite being a very competitive performer, referred Berry to the Chess ofces on forty-seventh and Cottage. Perhaps Waters, after hearing Berrys postblues pop sound, didnt feel threatened by this particular competitor. Leonard Chess asked Berry for music that day, which, of course, Berry didnt have.

So Chess sent Berry back to St. Louis to make a demo and return when it was done. Berry went home and recorded some originals, including a hillbilly song called Ida Mae, and he ventured back to Chicago later in the week. Chess dug the bucolic vibe of Ida Mae, though he suggested Berry change the name to Maybellene. Berry agreed, signed with Chess in the summer ofand rock history was made.

That record, and many other Chess sides that Berry performed, were made with Chess studio musicians that played with their blues artists: pianist Johnnie Johnson, bassist Will Dixon, and drummer Eddie Hardy. Through his quick-witted lyrics, words full of winking insinuations and minor puns about cars and girls, Berry laid the groundwork for rock n roll attitude. The song included a brief but scorching guitar solo built around his trademark double-string licks. A template, and a star, was born.

He had hits throughout the rest of the s. On April 16,he entered the Chess studio with some new tunes he wanted to cut. These three songs serve now as the cornerstones of rock n roll. He even established the lineup: guitar, bass, drums, and piano. One can plausibly assert, then, that Berry claimed his piece of rock n roll turf in Maydrew up the blueprint in Apriland completed construction in December of Scoppa, Chuck Berry, p.

In May ofBerry released his debut album, After School Session, and the second album issued by the Chess label, which had been releasing singles at the time. In fact, both rock n blues album were mainly collections of singles. But in a sign of respect that the Chess label had for Chucks rising signicance and popularity, they included every master completed during Chucks month tenure four sessions with the label that werent included on the movie Rock Rock Rock.

The song list also included two tunes from his fth session, School Day and Deep Feeling. As a result, the album is a mix of styles and contexts that would continue throughout his career, with anthems, story lines, blues, and tasty instrumentals.

Even at 30 years old, Chuck continued his dialogue with his teenaged audience and he managed to communicate skillfully with this demographic.

Many artistsBuddy Holly, the Everly Brothers, and later the Beatleswould address this audience effectively, but none did it quite as convincingly as Berry. But inhe stalled completely. He found himself back in jail again, this time for violating the Mann Act, accused of transporting an underage girl over a state line. As the story goes, Berry met a year-old waitress in El Paso, Texas after a gig there in December of He invited her to work as a hat-check girl in his nightclub.

Later that night, the girl was arrested on a prostitution charge in a St. Louis hotel room, and Berry was arrested for transporting her across state lines for the purpose of prostitution. An appeal on Berrys behalf was denied and he was sentenced to serve 20 months in prison. Looking at the bright side of his imprisonment, this was about the same time that Berrys music began to take root in the United Kingdom, so his career stayed viable.

By the time he earned release from prison at age 37, his tune Memphis, Tennessee had hit the Top 5 on the U. Berry won that particular lawsuit and the Beach Boys forked over a percentage of their publishing royaltiesthe song was a massive hitto Berry.

InBerry left Chess and signed to the Mercury label. But none of the ve albums he released for his new label, which included one live set backed by the Steve Miller Band, ever sparked commercial interest. Inhe returned to Chess and released a handful of albums that demonstrated hed regain something of his original magic. Still, at the time, he joined the oldies circuit. Inhe released his only 1 hit. My Ding-a-Ling was a lewd gig staple that Chuck used to get a cheap laugh from his audiences.

A version of it, recorded live at a gig in Manchester in the United Kingdom, found its way into the hands of a local disc jockey. The song earned a tremendous reception and Chess decided to rush-release it as a single.

A dubious feather in his cap, the song nonetheless added years to his career and lined his pocket. By this time, his music had grown so entrenched that he didnt even tour with a band, preferring to recruit pickup musicians in each new town. For Omni Hotel Nashville information call The call for artists to appear in the show only has a few days left, the deadline for submissions is this Monday, January Artists can submit up to four pieces, there is no size restriction, and no fee to submit.

Artists can submit images of their Beatles inspired artwork to gallery cartersexton. There will be a reception for the show at Carter Sexton on February 7, the 50 year anniversary of Beatles landing on US soil.

For more information, call or visit www. The band will be augmented by students from the Berklee College of Music, a 4 piece horn section, 2 winds, and a string quartet. For tickets and more information, check out their Facebook event page. Ringo Starr almost moved to U. For more information, visit www. Along with Tim's brother, Greg Piper, and keyboardist Morley Bartnoff, they also had the great honor of having Gregg Bissonette Ringo Starr's drummer play drums on the track, and also with Kat Raio the singing voice for "Elmo"and Clifford Carter who plays with Letterman's Will Lee as well as other top-notchers on strings and Hammond B3 organ.

Then, on February 9, Rodney Bingenheimer will play the track on his 50th Beatles anniversary show on A video of the song can be seen on www. A special guest Ed Sullivan impersonator will welcome the Beatles fans at the festive Hollywood gathering.

Guest musicians and singers will perform the Beatles timeless and memorable songs throughout the celebratory afternoon event. The special anniversary event is being held in support of the "Beatles NYC 50" events taking place to celebrate the memorable and history-changing musical anniversary. Vine Street in Hollywood. Check out the event's Facebook pages. Yeah, It Totally Was. Opening the special event will be operatic soprano Shayne Dalva singing "Yesterday". Other guest musicians and singers, including Beatles tribute band Ye Olde Beetles and Beatles-influenced rocker from Pakistan, Tee-M, will perform the Beatles timeless and memorable songs throughout the celebratory afternoon event.

Special guest Ed Sullivan impersonator Michael Sherman will welcome the Beatles fans at the festive Hollywood gathering. Dennis Garling, an official Hollywood Walk of Fame Star Polisher, will coordinate the special cleaning and polishing of all the Fab Four's individual stars just prior to the start of the event.

The event will conclude with everyone joining hands to form a large "Circle of Peace and Love". Could they do it again? She saw firsthand the impact of Brian's death on LP) faces of the Beatles as they got the news for the first time when they were all in Bangor, Wales for the Maharishi's meditation seminar.

Pattie said, "They The Beatles as a group would never be the same. Brian kept them together, he was the only person who could do it I'll never forget the look on the Beatles face's that they would have to look after themselves Vivek, who wrote "The Fifth Beatle - The Story of Brian Epstein," a NY Times bestseller, had researched different entertainment managers and found that Brian artist management practices set a new standard as a trailblazer manager but who ended up delegating many areas such as merchandising.

Martin Lewis spoke about how against great odds Brian achieved success with the Beatles despite a hostile environment as a result of latent anti-Semitism and legalized homophobia. Adding to his professional difficulties as a visionary for the Beatles and bringing provincial recording artists from Liverpool to London, Brian, who was a deeply closeted homosexual, also suffered with homosexuality being illegal all his life, which only became legal soon after he died.

Billy J. Kramer remembered Brian and spoke about how he met Brian, how being managed by Brian changed his life and how he achieved several hit singles and commercial success because of Brian. Pattie's last statement about Brian was, "Without Brian, there wouldn't have been the Beatles. He said, "Without Brian, the Beatles would have likely ended up becoming the 17th most popular cruise ship band.

The Beatles! Oh no! End of the Road I've never watched Mad Men, but may have to binge watch it now. Those that do watch, did you see this? Peregrine, i did not know where to put this. Hope this is OK.?? Wallrus can you post anything you want here. I'm not a moderator on this board. And I no have power over whats allowed to be posted here or not.

I just post the news here. To help out this Beatle Links message board. Which is a cool,wonderful and informative Beatles fan board. I'm also posting this else where.

So I don't mind at all,sharing it here to.

Souvenirs Van Plastique - Daan - Cinema (CD), Росы - Иван Купала - MP3 (CD), Nobody Knows You When You´re Down And Out - Various - Sea Bottom Jazz Festival (CD), Gnan Zonzon - M. Kponton - Encore Une Togolaise (Vinyl), Hamlick - Various - Benefit For El Chupacabra (CD), Matricule 45000 - Various - Les Zéros Du Pop Sont Sans Bretelles (Cassette), Im Gonna Keep On Loving You - Johnnie Taylor - Eargasm (Vinyl, LP, Album), Maleguena, Lou Maridage De Lourreno - Les Baladins et Les Musiciens de Provence* - Les Saisons du Roy René (Vin, Inédit OMcs - Dj Venom (9) - Original Mcs Sat Au Mic (Cassette), Untitled

MP3 Something's Wrong. MP3 Song For Catherine. MP3 Thumbs. MP3 Wait. MP3 White Kite Fauna. MP3 03 White Kite Fauna. MP3 04 Mr Freeze. MP3 05 Song For Catherine. MP3 07 Iron Flower. MP3 08 Wait. MP3 09 Paradise In Me. MP3 10 My Record Company.

MP3 11 Only Dreaming. MP3 12 Dad. MP3 13 Old Woman. MP3 14 Something's Wrong. Brightside Jacques Lu Con 01 Mr. Brightside Jacques Lu Con. MP3 Lagwagon - Duh-back. Lagwagon - 05 - Give It Back. MP3 Lagwagon - 12 - No One. Cab Driver. MP3 Leugenpaleis - Cas Goossens. Leugenpaleis - Het Leugenpaleis Afl 4 deel 1. I'm Gone. Manu Chao - Clandestino. Manu Chao - Desaparecido. Manu Chao - Bongo Bong.

Manu Chao - Je ne t'aime plus. Manu Chao - Mentira. Manu Chao - Lagrimas de Oro. Manu Chau - Mama Call. Manu Chao - Luna Y Sol. Manu Chao - Por El Suelo. Manu Chao - Welcome To Tijuana. Manu Chao - Dia Luna Dia Pena. Manu Chao - Malegria. Manu Chao - La vie A 2. Manu Chao - Minha Galera. Manu Chao - La Despedida. Manu Chao - El Viento. Para Tod s Todo Manu Chao - Intro.

Manu Chao - Bienvenida a Tijuana. Manu Chao - Machine Gun. Manu Chao - Peligro. Manu Chao - Casa Babylon. Manu Chao - Blodd And Fire. Para tod s todo. Manu Chao - Mr. Manu Chao - Radio Bemba. Para Tod s Todo. Merry Blues - Manu Chao. Bixo - Manu Chao. El Dorado - Manu Chao. Promiscuity - Manu Chao. Me Gustas Tu - Manu Chao. Denia - Manu Chao. Mi Vida - Manu Chao. Trapped By Love - Manu Chao. Le Rendez Vous - Manu Chao. Mr Bobby - Manu Chao. Papito - Manu Chao. La Chinita - Manu Chao. La Marea - Manu Chao.

Homens - Manu Chao. La Primavera - Manu Chao. La Vacaloca - Manu Chao. Infinita Tristeza - Manu Chao. Midlake - Roscoe. Midlake - Bandits. Midlake - Head Home. Midlake - Van Occupanther. Midlake - Young Bride. Midlake - Branches. Midlake - In This Camp. Midlake - We Gathered In Spring. Midlake - It Covers The Hillsides. Midlake Chasing After Deer. Midlake - You Never Arrived. Oizo Mr. Oizo - Flatbeat. Oizo - Loud Output.

Oizo - Shortkut. Oizo - Stunt. Nekvins - Ge moogt niet met uwe stok op iemand anders slagen. Timbaland - Promiscuous Girl. No Doubt-Don't Speak. Live Forever - Oasis. Have You Ever. Staring At The Sun. The Kids Aren't Alright. The Offspring - Americana - She's Got Issues. Walla Walla. The End Of The Line. No Brakes. Pay The Man.

Come Out Swinging. Original Prankster. Want You Bad. Millions Miles Away. Dammit, I Changed Again. Living In Chaos. Special Delivery. One Fine Day. All Along. Denial, Revisited. Conspiracy Of One. Huck It. The Platters-Only You.

Gillian, who was originally raised in Merseyside across from Liverpool, is also currently the Beatles news reporter on Beatles-A-Rama. We've got 25 pairs of tickets up for grabs. The Competition opens at Ongoing study of Beatles through infographics, much of which is based on secondary sources such as sales statistics, biographies, recording session notes, sheet music, and raw audio readings.

New York Classic Rock radio station Q The New York Fest will also include two performance stages and expanded hours. The book, The Beatle Who Vanished by Jim Berkenstadt, which uncovers the twisting trail of intrigue that has followed Nicol since his disappearance in the late sixties, is now available as a downloadable Kindle E-Book. He was This autographed White Album is the rarest fully signed Beatles album ever to be publicly auctioned.

In addition, a pair of Beetle cufflinks worn by John Lennon will also be up for auction. The cuff links feature a gold beetle with a red jewel representing the back of the beetle.

They were worn by John in earlyhe can be seen in photos wearing the cuff links on several occasions in For more information, and to register to bid, visit the auctioneer's official website at www.

Got That Something! Kozinn paints a vivid picture of the legendary songwriting duo at work, and the emergence of this distinctively British-sounding tune that-contrary to the assumptions of American record labels-became beloved in the United States, paving the way for the invasion to come and the lasting impact on American music that continues even today.

Allan Kozinn kozinn on Twitter began writing about music for The New York Times inand joined its culture staff in A classical music critic for much of his career, he is currently a cultural reporter for The Times.

The Beatles Room is dedicated to the many connections that link the Fab Four to the resort, including the Winter Gardens shows on November 16, that were filmed by American TV news crews and resulted in the first footage of The Beatles to be shown on US television, three months before the famous Ed Sullivan Show on February Cutting the ribbon, the Mayor of Bournemouth Cllr Dr Rodney Cooper said, "I can't wait to come back here time and time again, there's so much history on show and so many fascinating stories that relate to it.

Everyone have a safe and great Hanukkah and Thanksgiving day and take care. After being out of print for several years, the wonderful album of Beatles Christmas songs by the fabulous Beatles tribute band The Fab Four is now available on a CD called Hark! Music will be supplied by the very talented Fab Twins. For more information, phone Since tomorrow is Christmas eve and we all live in different time zones. I want to wish everyone now and their familys etc.

A safe and great upcoming Christmas day and happy Winter Solstice. In the interview, about performing on the BBC, Ringo said, "Those sessions were really immediate; there were no real overdubs of any sort. They'd tell us, 'We'd like you to be on this show and we'd like you to do 10 songs,' and we'd just say 'OK. Fans of all ages will enjoy sharing Rick and Brigid's experiences. Plus, this latest edition covers the return of the U.

Beatles albums and other forthcoming 50th anniversary events, on-the-scene coverage of Paul McCartney's Japan tour and recent U. A year's subscription in the U. For credit card orders, you can calle-mail goodypress gmail. BoxDecatur GA For more info, you can follow Beatlefan on Twitter at twitter. Also, check out their "Something New" blog at www. Stones: Whose side are you on? Kramer, Freda Kelly, Vince Calandra, and other special guests, curated and moderated by Martin Lewis, will take place on Thursday, February 6, pm.

Laguna Honda Hospital is a long-term, skilled nursing and rehabilitation center, committed to serving seniors and adults with disabilities living in San Francisco. His live broadcast of "Every Little Thing' is heard on For more information on Ken's work on the Beatles, visit www.

In addition to performing Beatles classics on show, the Grammy nominated group will debut "Because They were Fab," an original song written in honor of the Beatles 50th anniversary. Showtime at PM. The free event is sponsored by Hippie Radio and will be webcast live at HippieRadio To learn more about The WannaBeatles visit www. For Cutting Room tickets reservations go to www. For Omni Hotel Nashville information call The call for artists to appear in the show only has a few days left, the deadline for submissions is this Monday, January Artists can submit up to four pieces, there is no size restriction, and no fee to submit.

Artists can submit images of their Beatles inspired artwork to gallery cartersexton. There will be a reception for the show at Carter Sexton on February 7, the 50 year anniversary of Beatles landing on US soil. While the central focus is on the blues, some chapters deal with other forms of black music, particularly jazz; and because the subject offered more than European perspectives and focused on more than a one-way ow of music, the title for the book has been changed to Cross the Water Blues: African American Music in Europe.

The collection begins with my own broad overview of the subject raising some of the issues and concerns to be addressed in more detail by other contributors from a personal historical perspective.

The personal point of view continues with Paul Olivers insight into the appeal of the blues to British audiences of his generation.

As one of the earliest writers on the topic, and now one of the worlds leading authorities on the subject of African American music, Oliver is a prime example not only of the way in which black American culture took hold in Europe, but also how it became part of transatlantic culture. His inuence is reected in this collection in a variety of different waysbut especially in the endnote references in almost every chapter. Broad, general one might say, universal questions about the blues are explored by David Webster looking at the appeal of African American music, particularly the blues, for a white European audience in broad, philosophical terms.

Points raised in these early chapters inform most of the remainder which deal with particular historical and geographical locations: Jeffrey Green challenges the assumption that people of African origin were only active in nonconcert hall or classical music making, and looks at black composers who also went to the United States from Britain in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; Rainer Lotz provides an examination of, and begins.

In her consideration of African American inuences in interwar Paris, Iris Schmeisser, like Parsonage, suggests that in their emphasis on the exotic, European responses showed both the acceptance and rejection of black music as the other in a mixture of fascination, fear, and even envy. Sean Creighton, on the other hand, offers a survey of Paul Robesons visits to Britain that emphasize the wide appeal and success of that talented performer.

In turning to postwar developments Roberta Schwartz examines in detail the work of the evangelists including Paul Oliver who brought the blues to a wider audience, while Bob Groom looks at how the blues were popularized as part of the British skife boom and also raises wider questions about the origins and authorship of specic songs. The often controversial questions of authorship and the incorporation of black music into white pop are taken further in Rupert Tills examination of the blues in the work of three of the major British bands, the Beatles, Rolling Stones, and especially Led Zeppelin.

Also taking the inuence of the blues on British performers in the s as his starting point, Leighton Grist looks at the blues as a product of modernism in an approach that might be described broadly as cultural studies. The nal three chapters return to the wider European context. Guido van Rijns chapter charts the black American cultural presence in the Netherlands from the late nineteenth century on before focusing on the appeal of the blues to modern Dutch audiences.

Special emphasis is given to the detail of Bill Broonzys connections with the Netherlands. In looking at the blues in France, Robert Springer provides a concise overview of the subject and offers some possible explanations for the appeal of black American music for nonEnglish speakers. Finally, Christopher Bakriges explores the attraction of Europe for the black avant-garde and demonstrates once more how musical forms have evolved to transcend geographical, national, and possibly even racial boundaries.

Thus, in one way or another the various contributors to this volume point up the importance not only of African American music to the wider world, but also something of the inuence and signicance of European writers and musicians on this subject which has crossed the water. I am, of course, grateful to all the contributors to the conference from which these papers originated, but I am especially grateful to those who then contributed to this volume.

They have been enormously patient over a twoyear period and have unfailingly taken on board whatever suggestions were made to them by myself, editors, and readers. Anonymous readers made helpful comments in the early stages of production; David Evans read the whole manuscript in draft and provided extremely helpful feedback.

Craig Gill was very encouraging from the start and showed enormous perseverance, and Valerie Jones dealt with the many errors I missed. The volume is better as a result of all their comments, although I may have chosen to ignore a fewsometimes at the insistence of the particular contributor!

Special thanks are due to Paul Oliver who has always been supportive and whose inuence on blues writing is evident in almost every chapter of this book.

Paul not only suggested the title, but his own work is the greatest proof that African American music did indeed Cross the Water. Neil A. NOTES Most references in this book appear in the endnotes of respective chapters; where there are either few or no notes, references have been provided in separate bibliographies, and, where appropriate, discographies are also provided. Apparently there is some degree of uncertainty about the date of Handys discovery although Handy claimed to have rst heard the blues at a station in Tutwiler, Mississippi, he also printed a blues song that he heard around and referred to hearing a tune called East St.

Louis in Embassy, London. The impact African American music had on specically British popular culture was celebrated in the widely shown television documentary Red, White and Blues, directed by Mike Figgis as one of the seven-part series Martin Scorsese Presents the Blues made to celebrate the centenary of the blues in So much has the blues become a part of British musical culture that the Observer Sunday newspaper could run an ad as the lead up to its monthly edition on music marking years of the Blues or as it described it, Celebrating a century of sorrow inviting readers to ll in missing lyrics with the lines which began, of course, I woke up this morning.

Although little mention was made of wider European interest in the blues in Scorseses documentary series and accompanying publication, African American music and culture has long had an audience beyond the English Channel. According to one of the leading authorities on the blues, the Englishman Paul Oliver, the rst jazz critic in the world was probably the Belgian writer Robert Gofn, who published reviews in and established the rst jazz magazine, Music, in Not only did the University of Gloucestershire host the conference in which produced this book, but in the university signed an agreement with the European Blues Association based in Cheltenham to act as custodian to a major part of the Paul Oliver Collection of African American Music and Related Traditions for use in teaching and research.

By way of introduction to this collection I want to use my personal perspective to examine some of the reasons for the spread and inuence of African American culture in western Europe particularly in the s and s, but also in the twentieth century as a whole. Firstly, I want to look at the way I was inuenced by African American music and culture as a teenager.

Secondly, in doing this I want to locate my journey in a broader context and briey consider the well-known story of the way in which African American culture became part not just of British popular culture, but also of a wider transatlantic culture. Although I will focus on the postWorld War II period, I will also try to provide a broader historical overview of this interaction.

Thirdly, in the process I want also to look at how this history was also part of an ongoing and continuing discourse on race. Like many British teenagers in the s I was inuenced by black American music. For about two years between the ages of sixteen and eighteen although suffering from impaired hearing and possessing little musical ability! The play list for our rst paid appearance in Edinburgh in is very revealing.

Higginbotham a. Again, like many other people at the Dont You Love Me Any More - Louis Armstrong And His Orchestra - Louis Armstrong (Vinyl, I was drawn back from modern versions to the original songs and their antecedentsand in doing so followed exactly in the footsteps of the new leading groups of the daythe Beatles and Rolling Stones. Both were heavily inuenced by black American music. This mixture continued through several of their early albums, and Chuck Berry numbers were a regular Beatles feature on long play and extended play records.

However, my favorite of the two groups, the Rolling Stones were, recalled their bass player Bill Wyman, totally obsessed by the blues. Drummer Charlie Watts had played and still plays in a jazz band. What the Stones and other British groups did was take this music, reinterpret it, and play it louder and faster than the originals had.

As the black American bluesman Little Walter remarked inthey were playing the hell out of the blues. By visiting black singer Nina Simone could recall that all the kids in London were singing Negro rhythm and blues. More than this she noted, they give credit and respect where it is due, something they dont do too much at home. These black musicians had begun to visit Britain rst of all in the s, partly as a result of a revival in folk music, and partly as a result of growing interest in jazz.

Another factor was certainly the programs sponsored by the U. A few years later, in to be exact, Lonnie Donegan, the Glasgow-born banjo player with Chris Barbers jazz band began to play guitar and sing versions of American folk and blues songs during the bands intermission. One of these songs, Rock Island Line, originally recorded by Leadbelly although as Bob Groom points out, he had heard it rst from prisoners in Arkansaswas so popular it was released as a record insold three million copies, and became a hit on both sides of the Atlantic.

The skife craze was launched. This, combined with the emergence of rock n roll in the United States, encouraged many young British teenagers to take up guitars and form groups. By there were estimated to be more than ve thousand skife bands in Britain; one of these, the Quarrymen, eventually became the Beatles. World War II. His new amplied sound was more suitable to city clubs and bars, and it reected the mood of the growing northern urban black populations.

It was to have an enormous impact in Britain. Although he promised to learn some of the old blues numbers before he returned, by the time Waters toured again inthe city blues had caught on in Britain.

The spread of the blues in Britain was due in part to the evangelistic journalism and writing of record collectors and blues devotees described by Roberta Schwartz. The intermission performances in the jazz sessions had become full evening blues sessions; Barbers guitarist Alexis Korner soon left to open his own blues club and form Blues Incorporated, and very quickly there was a proliferation of blues clubs in and around London in the Thames Valley cottonelds of Richmond, Windsor, and beyond.

Some, like several jazz players before and after them, made their homes on this side of the Atlantic: Champion Jack Dupree moved rst to Switzerland, then Sweden before marrying and settling in Halifax, England; Memphis Slim became established in Paris where he organized blues tours. Sonny Boy Williamson spent all of in the United Kingdom, and he adopted an English tailor, wore a bowler hat, and carried an umbrella! Firstly, it was new, different, American.

Some British listeners said they did not initially realize the music was performed by African Americans Honey that it was of African American origin; they were attracted just because it was American. A ban by the British Musicians Union from until had limited the opportunities for American musicians to perform live in the United Kingdom, and the war and postwar austerity had also limited access to records. Nonetheless, there was already an audience in Britain that had heard American music on the radio, on the American Forces stations, or on imported records from U.

Paul Oliver recalled that he overheard African American servicemen in Suffolk in It was the strangest, most compelling singing Id ever heard. Similarly the British jazz singer, journalist, and raconteur George Melly became addicted when he chanced to hear a Bessie Smith record.

He later captured the sense of novelty when he commented on going to hear Big Bill Broonzy inthat the idea of hearing an American Negro singing the blues was almost unbearably exciting. Jazz had come to Europe during and immediately after the First World War, and so by the s already had a long-established following, but also, as Catherine Parsonage makes clear, had provoked some less than favorable responses.

Jazz provoked controversy all around Europe. Jazz particularly was even questioned in terms of its musical value. In Britain a reporter in the Times, January 14,described jazz as one of those American peculiarities which threaten to make life a nightmare.

The object of a jazz band, apparently, is to provide as much noise as possible. One critic in Sweden suggested in that any musician who played jazz for any length of time would lose their musical ability and eventually become an idiot! A later Swedish reviewer of a concert by Louis Armstrong said jazz was hardly music at all, merely an irritating rhythmic throbbing, which in its grotesque ugliness and eccentricity can never be enjoyable and hardly ever fun to hear.

In Paris, where jazz was everywhere bythe new music was particularly associated with the red-light district of Montmartre and was viewed by some as a threat to the traditional chanson. For a time it was banned by the Parisian police; jazz dancing was also banned in Italy in Introduced to the country by the avant-garde poet Valentin Parnakh following his visit to Paris in rather than by visiting Americans, dzhaz was accepted initially both as revolutionary and, with blues, associated with the black proletariat.

The oldest jazz orchestra in continuous existence, the Russian State-Chamber Orchestra of Jazz, had its origins in the orchestra started by Oleg Lundstrem in while he was in Shanghai. Apparently it was not until when Sam Woodings band appeared with the thirty-ve. However, the Soviet authorities later tried to prohibit jazz as bourgeois, and the Russian author Maxim Gorky in his essay The Music of the Gros in Pravda, described it as. For a while, even the playing of a saxophone was prohibited in the USSR.

Urban suggests that blues reached the USSR largely through the records of white British bands like the Rolling Stones and Yardbirds, and it was not until with tours by B. King and Gatemouth Brown that Russian audiences really encountered authentic live blues. However, a further period of cultural repression held back the development of blues until after Perestroika in Thus blues and jazz were linked very much to internal political developments.

If not always seen in such political terms, throughout Europe in the interwar years many people spoke explicitly of jazz in moral, religious, and racial terms, casting black secular music as the Devils music: a Canon Drummond of Maidenhead, England, condemned jazz dancing as, one of the most degrading symptoms of the present day. The dance of low niggers in America, with every conceivable crude instrument, not to make music but to make a noise. While jazz and blues were often regarded critically in moral, musical, and racial terms, black church music, gospel songs, and spirituals, on the other hand, were equally seen in terms of stereotypes, but of a more acceptable nature.

Black musicians had visited Europe right through the nineteenth centuryMajor Dumbledons Ethiopian Serenaders came inthe Georgia minstrels toured inand most famously the Fisk Jubilee Singers performed before Queen Victoria and attracted crowds in their thousands in the s in Britain and elsewhere in Europe.

A reviewer of their performance on February 21,given in St. James Hall, London, for the benet of the YMCA and the Factory Helpers Union, said that: following an introduction by the Countess of Portsmouth, the ten singers proceeded to sing the curious programme of sacred and secular songs which created so much interest in them in days long gone by. The effect of their singing is almost indescribable. Obviously the singing cannot be measured with the ordinary yard-stick of criticism.

It is not ordinary. It is not even singing in the ordinary sense. It is an agglomeration of the most weird musical sounds, the most unordinary rhythmical nuances. The connection with later black music is made explicitly by a writer describing the Negro in the theatrical journal Performer in He traced the line of development in a telling fashion: First he brings his slave ditties Then he charms us with his coon songs, Now hes sending us barmy with Jazz Whats his next stunt?

The minstrel tradition, of white performers in blackface singing the songs of the old South and presenting stereotyped images of happy, carefree, simple slaves, was also long established in the British music-hall at least since the Ethiopian Serenaders in and survived into the twentieth century.

One of the ironies of my own experience was to observe the pleasure with which my parents, who railed against the jungle music of Elvis Presley, watched the George Mitchell Black and White Minstrel Show that ran on British.

In part, as Sean Creighton demonstrates, this was due to the enormous range of his talent, from Shakespearean theater and movie actor through to classical music performer, but it was also due to the fact that his performances were often set within conventional white forms. Possibly, too, his rendition of spirituals, the music of survival and hope for an oppressed race, had a particular appeal to audiences experiencing the worst effects of the Depression.

Clearly, some black performers and musical styles did not divide their European audiences in the way that jazz, or later blues, did. In fact, of course, both critics and fans of black music shared some similar ground. It was precisely because jazz and blues were new, loud, often discordant, and questioning of established values with their use of the double entendres and open sexual references that they seemed attractive to young people in the jazz age of the s and again to teenagers in the s.

In Britain George Melly could recall how his prep school headmaster in the s would switch off any jazz discovered accidentally on the radio screaming lthy jazz. Melly noted he would mentally add jazz to Bolshevism and the lower classes. Nonetheless, jazz, in the form of swing, survived and indeed became a form of rebellion against the authoritarian regime.

Louis, Missouri, experienced personal freedom and artistic liberation. Baker rose to stardom demonstrating the unbridled sexuality, frenzy and primitivism that captured the white audiences. He pointedly remarked that the attraction of Paris was not just the life-style, although that was clearly importantwe had wonderful contracts as well.

Surely one of the most signicant jazz guitarists ever was Django Reinhardt, the Belgian-born musician who converted to jazz after hearing Ellington and Armstrong on record in For Sartre, jazz represented notre temps our times with its strange rhythms, abrupt phrases, and heavy voluptuous songs. It is the black jazz singer in Nausea and the song Some of These Days although ironically a song written by a black Canadian and sung by a white woman, Sophie Tuckerthat give Sartres character Roquentin some hope.

Gaily obscene, doudou about jazz in the excess of their boredom, I can do tracking, the Lindy-hop and tap dance. For Sartre and others in pre and postWorld War II Europe, black music was attractive also because it was a vehicle of the dynamism of American culture in all its immediacy and uncompromising energy.

At the same time, ironically, in its liberation and identication with the African American minority, it was a mode of protest. Thus it was that jazz bands frequently led the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament CND demonstrations against American nuclear might and the presence of U. Similar social attitudes and positivist humanist values informed them both. Du Boiss famous sense of two-ness.

Blues and jazz both could trace their origins back to the music of black slaves and could as several scholars including Paul Oliver have shown trace their roots back to Africa, if only indirectly. Recognizing the links with slavery, Larkin recalled being hooked on the rhythm that had made the slaves shufe in Congo square.

Smith and Gertrude Ma Raineynot only represented a predominantly rural southern community, they did so in the years before Dont You Love Me Any More - Louis Armstrong And His Orchestra - Louis Armstrong (Vinyl mechanization of the cotton industry in the s.

Their songs reected a bygone era for most white audiences, a pre-modern era with an oral tradition and references to mojos, black cat bones, and John the Conqueror; they also reected a life of hardship and suffering. For some British converts to black music, there was a sense of identication with the socio-economic hardships of African Americans.

Indeed, Leighton Grist suggests that the music had a particular class-based appeal. In a neat reversal Hooker, who performed in Newcastle, once asked a friend if he had ever heard of it; the friend racked his brain and asked Newcastle, Mississippi? Hooker replied No, Newcastle, Britain and commented on playing there, that was rough.

Although my father worked, we were far from well off, life was a struggle. Years later I found that many black musicians grew up in the Southern States of the USA in difcult circumstances, something of a shared experience.

It is doubtful that Wymans childhood really stood comparison with growing up black in the American South as he properly acknowledged when he indicated that he did not experience the awfulness of segregation and the problems of being treated as a second-class citizen. My family was lower, but aspiring, middle class, I went to a good school, and was fortunate enough to have a grant to support me through university.

Most of the members of the British blues bands seemed to come, with some exceptions, from similarly comfortable backgrounds; many like Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, and Eric Burdon were university or art college students.

This seemed true too of earlier generations of British lovers of African American music. Historian Eric Hobsbawm, while describing jazz as the.

At the same time not surprisingly, writers who were presenting gritty, northern working-class realism, together with politically left-wing inclined members of the middle class, could easily identify with what they saw as the music of the proletariat. Several of my colleagues have recalled that they were captivated rst by hearing someone play a harmonica or guitar although one also associated it with a teenage broken heart!

In the s and s music became much more accessible with the growing popularity of the guitar. My sixth-year class in Boroughmuir senior secondary school in Edinburgh in included at least four guitarists and two drummers, none, to my knowledge, with any formal music training.

Time and time again people like Eric Clapton recall hearing various blues artists, and although feeling empathy with the underdog, also became obsessed more with trying to master the guitar techniques they heard. Ironically the blues was rediscovered and reintroduced to white American audiences at the very moment that many African Americans were disassociating themselves from what they saw as down-home, old-fashioned, and even Uncle Tom music.

King reported playing in a key venue in before audiences that were 95 percent black; by the audience was 95 percent white. With the rise of civil rights came the discovery of black history. While this was especially true in the United States with the growth of Black Studies programs, it was also the case in British institutions. At my university in Edinburgh in there already was a well-established department of African Studies and the history department offered not just courses in American history, but LP) unusually, one in black history.

At the same time African American history was part of the developing revisionist critique of the superpower by then heavily involved in the war in Vietnam. American race relations was also something the wider public were made increasingly aware ofblack civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King and Malcolm X were both visitors to Britain and other parts of Europe, as were writers like James Baldwin, and sports personalities, most notably Muhammad Ali.

One of the attractions for me was the sense of an alternative history. Although I didnt realize it at the time, here was a very early but I think not widely recognized as such among the historical profession example of the emerging new social history. This history came from below and looked less at the dominant narrative of historical fact, the meta-narrative of the white hierarchy, but the lived experience of a people for whom the major dramas of national history often had little real signicance.

In writing of these often unknown performers and their songs, people like Paul Oliver, and LeRoi Jones in Blues Peoplerescued them from the enormous condescension of posterity, as the British Marxist historian and jazz writer Eric Hobsbawm noted, using the words of E. Thompson and the Making of the English Working Class, itself a seminal work of the period.

Black historian Robin Kelley has suggested that blues songs offer a hidden transcript for a people, many of whom could neither read nor write, and reveal the infra politics of segregated life in which black popular culture, if not directly oppositional, offered an alternative view of.

As the writer Ralph Ellison suggested, the blues express both the agony of life and the possibility of conquering it through sheer toughness of spirit. African Americans no longer wished to see their campaigns, their history, nor their culture appropriated by whites, no matter how liberal or well-meaning they might be. As Paul Garon and others have argued, what makes the blues unique is a system of reference based upon a shared experience in the past and the present, and this is the black experience, the experience of race prejudice.

Kings song, that provided me with my title Why I Sing the Blues, locates him overtly and specically in a history that stretches from slavery to urban ghetto. But more than this, as Paul Gilroy and others have clearly demonstrated, African American culture was also a transatlantic culture: while Chris Bakriges shows how through transatlantic migration jazz became more than just an American music, John Cowley has also demonstrated the varied links between Afro-Caribbean, Afro-American, and British Caribbean music.

Black musicians. Jazz, said saxophonist Bud Freeman, has moved to Europe. Thus, in the discovery and rediscovery of black music, and in the varied responses to it, Europeans have often revealed not only the universal appeal of the music, but also a constant element in the discourse on race and the transatlantic relationship. They too, share a part in African American history. NOTES 1. I rst gave a version of this paper at my Inaugural Address, University of Gloucestershire, April 20, Silander and C.

Wallin, eds. The Observer, November 16, Peter Guralnick, Robert Santelli, et al. The oldest extant independent jazz label in Europe is Storyville, established by Karl Emil Knudsen in Copenhagen in Paul Oliver, Jazz is where you nd it, in C.

Bigsby, ed. Quoted in Melody Maker, October 3, The rst country bluesman to visit Europe was probably Huddie Ledbetter Leadbellywho played in Paris in shortly before his death. Wald, Josh White, See van Rijn, Lowland Blues. Roberta Schwartz, Preaching the Gospel of the Blues.

Jeffrey H. Sam Wooding probably merits a chapter on his own in a book like this. A tenor horn player in the army during World War I, Wooding and his band joined The Chocolate Kiddies revue on a tour that began in in Germany where Woodings became the rst jazz ensemble to record in Europe. The revue went on to tour Russia, Turkey, England, and Italy. Wooding returned to the United States in See article by Susan C.

Times, March 15, Times, April 8,and see issues for detailing radio broadcasts. Allen, Times, February 22, The Ethiopian Serenaders, described in the London Illustrated News as negroes, were apparently whites in blackface.

A black group, the Ethiopian American Serenaders performed in Europe in the s. I am grateful to Rainer Lotz for this information. Melly, Owning Up, Berndt Ostendorf, Subversive Re-education? Baker was one of few jazz performers to abandon American citizenship in favor of their new country of residence. However, several shared the sentiments of Sidney Bechet when he remarked, every man has two countries, his own and France.

Quoted in Moody, The Jazz Exiles, The location of the black performer within the modernist movement is also the subject of Christopher Bakriges, Cultural Displacement, Cultural Creation: African American Jazz.

Musicians in Europe From Bechet to Braxton. It is interesting to note here that it is probably no coincidence that Paul Olivers other some might say, main area of expertise is in vernacular architecture on which he is a leading world authority.

Larkin, All What Jazz, Wyman, Blues Odyssey, 9. Shapiro, Alexis Korner, The African American history course was taught by George Sam Shepperson, a Marxist historian whose writings included several works on W. Du Bois and aspects of the African diaspora. Cambridge University Press, A lovely woman in her 50s who should have a long time yet to live.

I always knew. When you were young. Now youve got so much fear, Charlie. Meeting Greg, and leaving your Dad. Then meeting Scott and leaving Greg. I could never get the sequences right. And p. For the better. Mary Baker thinks. Got it. And thinks. It came to me. WOMAN is inside. Going up? And the door opens. The one Ive got I dont want it to be it. Charlie follows with a cell phone, making the call. Marys sweatpants fall down around her ass.

Its not a pretty sight. Its a big and affecting laugh. Come here. Charlie smiles Okay, then. I love you, Charlie. Have fun in Bucharest. Mary Baker gets in the elevator and the doors close. No, we dont have any books on Bucharest. You know why? Because no one from there can read or write is why. All they can do is have sex with child prostitutes and get AIDS. Oh wait. They can also harvest organs like nobodys business. Its world capital of that shit.

Nadia whats-her-face and all? Its super pretty and they shoot all the pornos there. Id like less dumb-ass information. Wheres your head at? Im off at Bring a bottle. She doesnt notice. He reaches into an old winter boot and pulls out a KEY.

A GIRL is asleep. He watches her until he hears a FART. Charlie laughs. Melissa wakes up and sees him. Theres a GUY there. Charlie doesnt laugh. He goes. Melissa comes after him. Go home. Forget it. You love that I call you Charles.

No more. Hes Ted. TED Everything cool? My name is. Dont go to bed. Forget what she said. Stay here instead. Do not go to bed. Not back where you far Melissa tries to keep a straight face.

Okay, Ted? Who gives a shit. Give us a minute. Ted blushes. Hey, bro! TED Enough! Melissa turns Ted toward the bedroom. She whispers in his ear. Ted Dont You Love Me Any More - Louis Armstrong And His Orchestra - Louis Armstrong (Vinyl at Charlie, and goes. Coming here being funny. Youre not funny, Charles. With the AIDS and the organ harvesting? Its the place for me.

Its supposed. All you do is sit in your apartment and do nothing. Fucking do something for once. Like Godzilla. I see. Well, Melissa. I had a nice time being your boyfriend for a while even though all we did was fight and you made me cry when it was over.

He offers his hand to shake. She hugs him. He pulls back. I myself had sex tonight. Not by myself. It was me, along with another individual. A girl. He wears a suit. He reaches an office, knocks. A woman, JAN, is inside. Shes happy. Are you serious? Effing nailed it! Never cease to amaze.

Save Secure Backup is my crowning achievement. JAN Whoa. I told you you came back from bereavement too soon. Take the week. Dont do anything rash. JAN Thats rash, Charlie.

Its something Ive got to do. Being paperless and all. JAN Dont talk crazy, Charlie. Charlie and Scott are bellied up. Scott lifts a shot of Sambuca. Wherever the hell. They drink. Charlie looks a little piqued. SCOTT contd. Charlie nods We did the right thing. I know it. Look how sad, dahlinge. The poor soul. We want so badly to believe he does the right thing for himself. But how can we, when we know how it ends for him? I will tell you how -- because of love. We may comfort ourselves knowing that love awaits him.

He tries to push the man back, but he wakes. Hes got high gray hair and the bluest eyes. Never mind. Istvan touches Charlies face. The eyes. You look bad. What is wrong Scott cries. Charlie goes. I am sorry for you. My wife died many years time ago. I have never had another woman since. But I see your point. Ur Isten! I dont go to Bucharest! Were going to Budapest. I take another flight to Bucharest.

I am in Bucharest one time. Never again. Charlie takes out a BOOK. You do not like to speak with me. No trouble for me. Should you not want to know what I am doing in Chicago? Why an old Magyar man is going to there? Magyar is Hungarian word for Hungarian. See, you can learn something by talking. Im curious. He sets it atop his. So she send me to Chicago to visit a game with the Cubbies Istvans blue eyes brighten and his face beams.

Charlie smiles. Weeping happily. I mean, you live in Hungary. Jack Brickhouse and the Cubbies on the black market and we listen together under the blankets for fear of being caught by secret police. We are, how do you say, long time suffering. Always an invasion or occupation, always beaten in the wars. We are the heartbreak people, but our character is always strong. Same as the Cubbies. May I show to you something incredible? Istvan puts it on and smiles.

You think she will love it? This is what I thought! Who wouldnt. Istvan is asleep, leaning on Charlies shoulder again. Charlie sleeps too. He wakes. Istvan still leans on him. He gently tries to move him. Somethings wrong. Istvans face is ashen. Charlie tries to shake him. Oh shit. Can someone This man is-People begin to stir. I think hes, um, I dont know.

He was fine. Rigor mortis. Charlie looks sick. Youll alarm the others. Is there a doctor on board? They look back at the body. At Charlie. He remains in his seat by the window. Trapped, stunned. After a bit, Flight Attendant approaches Charlie.

This man is from there and it really does simplify things. We are sorry for the inconvenience. Well keep them coming. Theres a dead person sitting next to me. Lets try to make the best of it, shall we? Charlies had enough drinks to be drunk. Flight Attendant comes over. Youll have to climb over, I suppose.

She goes. Charlie stands and tries to squeeze, but the person in front of Istvan is reclining and asleep. Hes getting up. Istvans sheet moves. Charlie, come in to here.

Charlie looks around to see if someone is talking to him. Theyre not. Charlie lifts the sheet. Istvan smiles at him. I tell her you are going to Bucharest. She smiles for you. I see also my wife and she made some sex with me. It is my daughter -- perhaps you will give her my gift, and tell her she is my deshem lny. Istvan is gray and dead again. Charlie comes out from under the sheet. Everyones looking at him like hes a freak. Passengers disembark, moving around Istvan like hes, well, a dead body.

Charlie is stuck there. The official takes Istvans bag from the floor. It is belonging to me. Ha ha. Its What? It was the dead mans funny hat. The official takes the hat. Charlie turns to the passenger. Tell him its my funny hat. How do you say youre a fucking asshole? The official gives Charlie a cold stare.

Dont let the American take the funny hat. The guys move Istvan away from the gate. He pockets it. How do we choose, dahlinge, between something and nothing, if nothing is all weve ever done? Charlie is going to explode. God dammit, we must do it! Charlie breaks into a run.

Hes going for the hat. The official sees him. No time to react. Charlies there. The official yells. Charlies heading right for them. He doesnt see them. Charlie is knocked to the ground. He slides into the wall, in a heap. The guards jump him, yanking him up. He flails wildly.

You fucking pricks! Lemme go! Charlie convulses, and goes limp. He seems dazed. His hair is staticky. His suitcase is there. He checks his watch. He calls through the open door.

Guard One has the beer hat on, and is slurping coffee from a cup set in one of the holders. Soon a weary-looking MAN in a cheap suit arrives. Guard One takes the hat off and hands it to him. He enters the room, holding the hat and Charlies passport.

Ebbs And Floes - Sleeping Peonies - Ghosts, And Other Things (File, Album), RSVP My RRSP (P.S. I Love You) - Weights & Measures - Invest In The Death Of (CD), Raiden & Khanage - King Stays King (Icicle Rmx) / M82 (Spirit Remix) (Vinyl), Harvest - Various - Harvest Revisited (CD), Innocent Party - Fish - Scattering Crows Live In Europe 2004 (DVD), I Cant Help It (If Im Still In Love With You) - Hank Williams - 40 Greatest Hits (Cassette), Dream, La Prospettiva Di Me - Laura Pausini - Resta In Ascolto (CD, Album), Wild Rose - Straight And Narrow (Cassette), Laudamus Te - Johann Christian Bach, Edith Wiens, Gabriele Schreckenbach, Adalbert Kraus, Ernst Gero, Rock-A-Bye Your Baby With A Dixie Melody - Connie Francis - 19 Original Albums & Bonus Tracks (C, Artie Shaw And His Orchestra, Dizzy Gillespie And His Orchestra - The Greatest Recordings Of The Big

9 thoughts on “Honey, Dont You Love Me Any More - Louis Armstrong And His Orchestra - Louis Armstrong (Vinyl, LP)

  1. Jun 05,  · Here's a fine tune from Louis Armstrong, recorded in and released here on a Bluebird label 78 rpm record about Enjoy!

  2. Baby, don't you love me any more? Oh, I know there must be someone else If you can treat me so But I don't care if there's another cat, baby I ain't gonna let you go And what you do is what you don't And what you do is what you won't Now baby, I'm going mad 'cause I Baby, don't you love me any more? Yeah Now honey, don't you love me any more.

  3. Jul 17,  · Listen to Honey, Don't You Love Me Anymore on Spotify. Louis Armstrong · Song · Music Duration: 3 min.

  4. Listen to Honey, Don't You Love Me Any More? - Remastered - on Spotify. Louis Armstrong · Song · Music Duration: 3 min.

  5. Filename C:\Users\Mummy\Desktop\Rips\01 - Louis Armstrong - Honey, Dont You Love Me blueskyservices.biz Pre-gap length Peak level % Extraction speed X Track quality % Test CRC 1E45DB45 Copy CRC 1E45DB45 Cannot be verified as accurate (confidence 5) [ADACD21A], AccurateRip returned [30DB6ABE] (AR v2) Copy OK Track 2.

  6. Honey - Don't Love Me (Official Video HD)Find us on the web:blueskyservices.biz://blueskyservices.biz://blueskyservices.biz

  7. honey do you love me, huh, quit your hesitatin', i'm tired of waitin', honey do you love me, huh. honey won't you hold me tight, honey won't you hold me tight, that ole moon above, was just made for love, honey won't you hold me tight, start your turtle dovein' i need a little lovin', honey won't you hold me tight. [repeat verse one].

  8. I'm in love with you, Honey, Say you love me too, Honey, No one else will do, Honey, Seems funny but it's true. Loved you from the start, Honey, Bless your little heart, Honey, Every day would be so sunny Honey, with you. Chords by lines:Bb,C,F,GmCF7,Bb,DGm,CmABbG,CF7Bb.

  9. Feb 07,  · What episode is this from: "You don't love me. You never loved me. I know why you married me Alice. I know why you married me. Because you were in love with my uniform." I bought The Honeymooners DVD, but there is one episode that is not on the DVD. My mom swears that it's part of the original All I remember from it is the above quote.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *