Restless. Tired. Uneasy - Toby Foster (2) - 100 Ways (Vinyl, LP)

The respected orchestral composer's stamp of approval made Ian's music safe for timid radio programmers - KRLA in Los Angeles even took out a full-page ad apologizing to Ian for previously blacklisting her music. Far from a time-capsule piece that requires historical context, "Society's Child" still retains its literary and emotional power to this day, and it made Janis Ian a star at Lollapalooza 's three days of ten hours of music on eight stages is more than any one person could completely experience all by themselves.

It all comes down to key decision-making and planning. We've spent the last week running down all of our picks for some of the hardest match-ups over the weekend, and what follows is a full list of our picks for who to see and who to miss. Keep an eye on Transmission all weekend and next week as we review choice sets and after-parties around town.

Read all our Pitchfork Music Festival coverage here! There's truly one festival in Chicago which has consistently worked to cram as much as possible into the confines of one block-long city park.

Sure you could stumble for a mile or more around that other big festival later on in August, but it wouldn't nearly be the same as the cozy confines of Union Park with the Pitchfork Music Festival.

With the sun on our heads, we'll carry on like kids well, some of you are kids scampering between the music stages now named with the colors Red, Blue, Greenfood and beer stalls, porta-potties, Flatstock music posters, the CHIRP Record Fair where you'll find our Gapers Block tabletons of non-profits, and the Coterie arts and crafts fair. In between all that, you might even catch a set of music or two while relaxing on a blanket.

We'll have live reviews and artist interviews you can catch up with later. So smear on some zinc oxide, grab a bottle of water and your hula hoop and see what Transmission staff have to say about every single act this weekend. I first met Michael McDermotta local singer-songwriter with a dedicated fan base across the country, at a photo shoot in a Chicago graveyard six years ago. After a few weeks of searching, I received separate e-mails from McDermott and the Mannequin Mena spirited Chicago punk band still making great music, saying that I could follow them around if I wanted.

I spent the next two months at gigs and occasionally in bars with McDermott, talking about music and listening to his stories. I found McDermott charming, talkative and very open. I wrote my piece and decided to separate Mannequin Men's and McDermott's story, because they were unique in their own way.

I held on to each story, waiting for the right moment to pitch it to a publication. It just never felt complete. Until now. McDermott will be performing his first album, 's W. Surfand its follow-up Gethsemanein their entirety at Lincoln Hall on Saturday. This year marks the 20th anniversary of W.

Surfwhich referred to McDermott's Lakeview address at the time. The album brought McDermott some fame 20 years ago, but the lifestyle that followed the newly-found fame also introduced him to the darker sides of life. Mark Caro also profiled him recently in a great piece for the Tribune. It was an incredible show, and afterward I wished I'd had a recording of it.

A couple years later, I was searching for something on the Internet Archive when I stumbled into its Live Music Archivea vast collection of recording of concerts from all over the place, much of it downloadable in multiple formats. I did a quick search, and there was my coveted concertfree for the taking. As I revisited Andrew Bird's listing on the LMA to see if his Gezelligheid show was available it's notI got to thinking recently about how much local music there is available in the archive, and how hard it is to sort through.

One of the easiest ways to approach it, in my mind, was to break it down by venue. So that's what I did. Here's an exhaustive list of links to recordings made at bars, concert halls, theaters and pavilions in Chicago and the suburbs. I've also included the few music festival recordings I could find.

There are a handful of stragglers and outliers that I didn't include here, mostly LP) shows at marginal venues; search Chicago for an unfiltered list. Marc Ruvolo isn't the type to take it easy. With ventures in music, literature and art, Ruvolo is always looking for his next creative outlet. His latest and most notable undertaking presents itself as Chicago's only genre bookstore, Bucket O' Blood Books and Recordswhich also offers customers an impressive vinyl and CD selection.

Ruvolo's name might sound familiar because he's the co-founder and now sole owner of Johann's Face Recordsa label that helped spawn the careers of some of Chicago's best known punk acts like Alkaline Trio and The Smoking Popes. Obviously, he's acquired quite a bit of music over the years. That collection, paired with a lifelong passion for science fiction and fantasy literature, led to the idea for Bucket O' Blood.

The store opened June 4, And when a customer buys something, then I get to buy new things, so I get that part of the collecting. I don't get to keep it, which is fine with me. I don't really care anymore. When it comes to hyping a crowd, David Krueger's a pro. If anyone was a little sleepy, post-lunch, they're awake now. Krueger takes his place onstage among the group and they launch into their opening number, "Get This Band Going.

A drumbeat kicks in. One member, Jean Wilson, sporting an eye-catching sequined jacket, adds her own propulsive percussion. Then bass, guitars, and keys join in, filling out the sound and building a palpable energy. The band also includes singer Kelly Stone not present for the Vaughn HS showdrummer George Lawler, and bassist Taylor Hales, and occasionally other local musicians fill in for the rhythm section. If you've ever had the privilege of seeing the Arts of Life Band live, you know that once the ensemble has gotten going, they're a veritable locomotive of energy and enthusiasm barreling down the tracks.

Their original songs, including those featured on the new album Around and Aroundtraverse genres--rock, rap, disco etc. How do they put it all together? Arts Fest photo courtesy Arts of Life Band. Lisa White posted a partial list last Sunday, but thanks to some computer wizardry, we're now able to share a much more complete list of the Chicagoland acts on the South by Southwest Music Festival -- as well as those from Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Wisconsin and the rest of Illinois.

We've also put together an expanded list of showcases hosted by local labels, venues, publications and others. As if his current bands' two Grammy nominations weren't enough, Pikelny also appeared on Letterman to receive the Steve Martin Prize for Excellence in Banjo and Bluegrass.

When I spoke to him this week over the phone he was gearing up for a U. The banjoist found out he'd been selected as the award's inaugural recipient via a letter signed by the board of professional players and musicologists involved in the decision process, several of whom Pikelny described as musical role models.

Rosenberg, Bela Fleck and, of course, Steve Martin. It's hard enough thinking of the best holiday gifts for your friends, but when they're music lovers, like our Transmission staff, it can be an even harder task, as we certainly like to share our opinion about just about everything.

So we've compiled a list of our favorite picks for Chicago Restless. Tired. Uneasy - Toby Foster (2) - 100 Ways (Vinyl lovers, and we hope you'll spread the love locally this year as well. The weather's turned mittens-optional, and our pumpkin chais are getting changed out for peppermint lattes, so of course we're starting to get the itch to make plans for the holidays.

For music lovers, there's often an maddening abundance of great shows at local venues at a variety of ticket prices. The Transmission staff has started a New Year's Eve show roundup here, listing our favorite club's plans for the night where everyone rides freeer, cheap. You still have time to get tickets to almost all of these concerts, and we even mention some great, though sold out, shows, just in case you happen to get a pair of tickets as a gift for the holidays.

What follows is those Chicago venues that have announced their December 31st entertainment. Check back as we add additional lineups. For the year-old Do It Yourself record label head and musician, the well publicized issues affecting many an established record label exists in an entirely different universe. Di Benedetto also plays bass in Parrhesiaa heavy, aggressive punk band he's been a part of since December His passionate dedication to the local punk community grew from his upbringing in Glenview.

Though the Logan Square bowling alley shuttered its doors to all-ages concerts in — that is, until recently — Di Benedetto's interest in punk continued to grow. We have no shortage of music festivals here in Chicago, but Riot Fest stands out from the rest by bringing in punk acts spanning generations, reuniting legendary bands, and supplying a plethora of "secret" shows around the city. I had a blast at last year's festival, and this year they've really outdone themselves with an over-the-top line-up.

Each year they've been expanding in size and talent, this year featuring performances by Bad ReligionThe Mighty Mighty Bosstonesand Naked Raygun. Riot Fest is also expanding into new territory - metal - with performances by High on FireTorcheAgnostic Frontand original line up performances by Articles of Faith and Corrosion of Conformity.

Check below for a full Riot Fest run down. Before PandoraHype Machineand even Last. Founded inEpitonic was one the first sites to offer free and legal mp3s from independent bands and labels from around the world. Music fans would spend hours digging through the site's recommendations and discovering bands they would have completely missed without the site. Epitonic lasted untilbut has remained dormant since. However, one of the original founders and co-owner of the site, Chicagoan Justin Sinkovich The Poison ArrowsFile Recordsis being the site back is a big way, and the support has been overwhelming.

He has started a Kickstarter page for fans to help and show their support, and is planning a launch event to be held when the new site is ready. We recently had the opportunity to ask Justin a few questions about Epitonic, why it is coming back, and what we can expect.

Michael Zerang photo by Gareth Mooney. The first thing Michael Zerang wants to talk about, following our initial chit-chat and coffee orders, is his new xylophone. Zerang rattles off numerous details about the instrument: made in the '30s, blonde with rosewood bars, four octaves — few xylophones made these days are that large.

It doesn't have a 'give' the way a vibraphone or a marimba does. It's like a bagpipe — it's either on or it's off," he laughs. He's practicing it for a performance he'll give today September 2 at noon, as part of the Michael Zerang Organic Unita sextet accompanying a Butoh dance troupe at the Jay Pritzker Pavilion as part of the Chicago Jazz Festival. Of course, xylophone is not the only tool in Zerang's arsenal. Neither, for that matter, is music his only outlet for his love of rhythm.

Whether thundering behind the well-oiled jazz compactor that is the Peter Brotzmann Tentet or grounding the transmissions of gentler musical aliens like his trio with Mats Gustafsson and Jaap Blonk, Zerang is an ensemble's lightning rod.

Unlike many free improvisers, Zerang possesses a rare gift — fearlessness in the face of silence. He's just as comfortable with negative space as with filling the frame. Every year it becomes harder and harder to decide what band to see during a particular hour at Lollapaloozapartly because the bands are so great, partly because choosing a band on one end of the vast Lollapalooza empire means you just won't have time to hoof it to the other end for another's set.

Here's our full preview of what to hit and what to skip at the festival. What is music like when you can't hear it? It's a question that sounds like a philosophical debate on par with trees falling in the woods and single hands clapping, but this is not a question for rhetorical amusement, it's something that audiophiles as well as hearing people in love with signed languages and Deaf culture have thought about in depth.

What is the deaf person's experience with an art form that is seemingly only valued by those with fully functioning cochleas?

There is a notion that music is only heard and thus, can only appreciated by the hearing. However, deaf people have a unique and challenging perspective to music that has seldom been explored outside of deaf communities. With in the deaf and hard of hearing world, there are people not only creating music, but people who love and make music a part of their lives. In this world, the various shades of gray are celebrated as the spectrum of deafness, from slightly hard of hearing to "stone deaf" are all part of this community.

The experience of sound can be different for many people who's abilities with hearing are not clearly identified in terms that hearing people are used to. Most assume deaf people enjoy music solely by tactile sensations, but going beyond feeling vibrations, what is the experience of music like for someone who doesn't hear or least least like we do?

There are also even more photos by George Aye coming soon. In case you missed them, please also enjoy Lisa White's interviews with artists from the weekend.

Blu Blockers, Ray Bans, mustaches, headbands, skimpy clothes and sweat This indie music festival has certainly turned more mainstream over the past several years of its existence, selling out quicker each year, making those beer lines ever longer, but at it's heart it's still about the music.

The theme for the weekend was definitely the Restless. Tired. Uneasy - Toby Foster (2) - 100 Ways (Vinyl. Temps were in the 90s all three days with the refuge of a single thunderstorm that rolled through early Sunday, but actually left things even more humid.

Day one knocked the price of waters down from two dollars to one, and by day three were two-for-one. Every band's introduction included reminders to stay hydrated and keep an eye on your neighbors, pointing out the location of the first aid tent.

Festival organizers were nice enough to hand out free waters to those camped in the first few rows for the evening headliners, with only one request: "Please do not throw them. Alright already, enough about the heat. If you were there, you're well aware of how hot and steamy it was. Let's get talking about the music, there was a ton of it! Our staff is pretty excited about the upcoming Pitchfork Music Festival. We fall under "other delights. Remember to check out all the other non-performance activities this weekend including Flatstock, the Rock for Kids' auction booth, the Coterie craft fair, and more.

Transmission writer Lisa White be bringing you daily coverage, as well as a festival wrap-up after the weekend's over from Michelle Meywes all paired with photos by George Ayebut for now, here's our thoughts on what you can hear in Union Park on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.

Chicago is the home of jazz and the blues. That's no secret. Going back to Jelly Roll Morton and eventually giving the world Chess Records and the Bo Diddley beat, the foundation of Chicago's music history is built almost entirely by the "blues people" who came up from the South. But Chicago has a less-advertised but storied history with an unlikely genre — bluegrass. Yes, the mandolin and banjo-laden music often associated with backwoods Kentucky and the Tennessee hills had some roots right here.

The show is often cited as "second only to the Grand Ole Opry" in its time and was an outlet for Southerners who had recently migrated north. Monroe later became "The Father of Bluegrass," and the rest, of course, is history. Today, blues bars are spread out all over the city, but there isn't a single "bluegrass bar" in the strictest sense of the term.

And while Bloodshot Records mixes roots music with punk sensibilities, there isn't a bluegrass label here in town, either. But there's certainly a "scene. And it's not an easily defined genre, considering bluegrass is split up by subgenres and factions. But there's a number of musicians in town — young and old, suburban and inner-city — playing bluegrass to an enthusiastic audience.

Here's a look at three of Chicago's major players in the bluegrass scene and a guide for seeing the music around town. With the 27th annual Chicago Blues Festival kicking off Friday, and Eric Clapton's sold-out Crossroads Guitar Festival right around the corner, it's important to take a look at how much one of Chicago's top tourist attractions has changed since the musical genre's heyday in the s and '60s.

The Chicago blues sound is equal parts electric and soulful. It has inspired countless numbers of musicians and gave birth to rock 'n' roll. The blues is one of the purest forms of American music, and Chicago became the place to turn it on its head and make the blues its own. Some 60 odd years ago, it was pretty customary to be able to drive through Chicago's South and West sides and see an immense number of blues clubs and juke joints, such as the Flamingo Lounge, Gatewood's Tavern and The Flame Club.

Inside, one could find patrons dancing and singing along to some of the rawest, grittiest and sweatiest music the city has ever known. Smoke-filled, dimly lit rooms overcome with loud electric guitar and soulful crooning could carry on until the wee hours of the morning. Chicago blues wasn't just another sub-genre of music, LP) -- it was also very much a release for African Americans looking to escape the hardships and discrimination encountered in daily life.

Today, the number of blues clubs in the predominantly African-American neighborhoods of the South and West Sides has dwindled significantly.

Many of the establishments that once played host to iconic blues men and women such as Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters, Little WalterJunior Wells and Koko Taylor now cease to exist, as well as the aforementioned legends that frequented them. Junior Wells c. If one could close their eyes during Chicago-based dance-pop shoegazers Panda Riot 's set at the Empty Bottle one late Sunday night in April, they'd swear that they heard the second coming. Not of the Stone Roses, or the King of Kings himself, but of a wave of British psychedelic music that saw its artistic zenith in the late s and early '90s.

Slowly, but surely, a shoegazer revival has come to dominate national critical discourse, with widely known groups like Serena-Maneesh, The Big Pink and A Place To Bury Strangers all recently releasing new material and playing Chicago shows. What isn't so known is that, based on a wealth of new material from several local up-and-comers, a revival of the aesthetic is occurring locally as well.

But it's not necessarily a scene, per se. In fact, many Chicago-based participants question the premise of a shoegazer revival in the first place.

As they explain it, they simply aren't interested. Sitting in the Bottle's basement lounge before their show, Brian Cook, Panda Riot's guitarist makes a key distinction. I wouldn't say that I'm a fan of the genre. But I think traditional shoegaze is kind of Is that too negative?

For a beat, Cook thinks about the answer to his own question before saying in a matter-of-fact, yet cautiously self-deprecating tone that "I think loud guitars and buried voice is just dead in the water. I mean, it is. Towering over this river, Centennial Bridge connects these states. A few steps in from shore is the Great River Trail.

One can move along it slowly and savor it for miles. A few more steps in is the small city of Rock Island. There are streets and people. At night — voices and lights. There are bars, restaurants, businesses. Up above them both, there are engineers and magicians at work. In one room a magnificent sound is created. This is done 15 inches and one second at a time. Seven times a week, for several hours a session, for over four years this has been done here.

The tape collection has been growing. And now, one can move along it slowly and savor it for miles. Welcome to Daytrotter. Chicago has a rich history of jazz, from the speakeasies of the '20s, to a thriving community of innovators that exists today. Ratchet, taking place Monday nights at the Skylark in Pilsen, is a jazz series in the vein of Umbrella MusicImmediate Sound, and Elastic Artswhich are collectives and LP) in this small, but visionary creative music community.

The name Ratchet is a reference to a "machine or mechanism that can only move forward, relentlessly — like the tradition of creative music and art in general," says Ratchet founder Frank Rosaly. The tradition of jazz has always been to push the line. While traditional standards from the "jazz age" of the twenties may sound like tame oldies to us now, at the time it certainly pushed the boundaries of what was acceptable, both musically and socially. Jazz in those days was widely considered immoral and vulgar due in part to the fact that most jazz clubs doubled as speakeasies, not to mention its connotations with sex.

This four-piece, alt-country band consists of Damien Christian vocals, guitarLaura Loo vocalsShrek bassand Swede drums. Under no circumstance should one delay in checking out The Blind Staggers — their enthusiasm and determination about their music is sure to make this outlaw-country band explode.

Our intrepid staff of audiophiles headed out on Saturday, April 17, to our favorite record stores in Chicago to see what we could find. If you've got your own experiences to share, please let us know in the comments or drop us a line. A holiday for us audiophiles, Record Store Day is once again upon us. This Saturday, April 17, your favorite local record store is likely dusting off the promotional posters, putting out a brand new stack of special 7" releases, and throwing open its doors wide to a horde of eager music scavengers waiting outside the doors.

Many of the Transmission staff have been eagerly anticipating this day all year, along with many of you. There are oh, about a gazillion potential limited edition gems out there to be found, and your local shopkeeps have been working hard to obtain them from the record labels. Keep an eye here on Sunday with a recap and snaps of sweet sweet finds at our favorite Chicagoland music shops.

If you're headed out on your own, here's a rundown of some of the events and goings on. Have fun, be polite, and always tip your hat. Here's Chris Brown of indie chain Bull Moose giving you the scoop on exciting new releases to be had:.

Of course it was my idea, but still, the question came. That's when I knew I was in for a strange and beautiful ride. That's always the first sign. Music can be made in any setting, but music made on open mic nights demands the presence of strong drink, and a certain disregard for sleep. This is true for all parties involved. I knew that going in and realized some self-inflicted rules would be absolutely necessary prior to taking the plunge.

One: In the interest of coherence, only one of these high-powered drinks would be allowed to enter my body and mind each night. And three: Before it was all over, with a blatant disregard for all things sacred and good, I would also perform. That is the purpose of all this, isn't it?

A free pass to perform without the burden of any shadowy shame, a sort of musical absolution — mercy for the awful, praise for the average, and an all-out adulation for the few capable of riding that high and mighty wave — the highs and lows on the open mic. Although seemingly inauspicious words, this would prove to be the last utterance of the band Japanther before they left the SXSW showcase they were scheduled to headline.

Heads down, avoiding eye contact, they made their way out of the venue with gear in hand, off to the van to continue their tour. Left behind was the entire staff of the label who'd organized the showcase, who had brought them on for star power, who had re-arranged their running order so that they could open instead of close, and who'd also been trying to get one of the other showcase bands to show up early with a drum kit due to Japanther's lack of one.

But even with the would-be opener gone and the temperature having dropped some 30 degrees outside, the students chose to carry on and make the best of it. They had a label to run — not to mention their professor had come along as well, and this would probably Restless. Tired. Uneasy - Toby Foster (2) - 100 Ways (Vinyl into the grade. In the world of sports, we might be rivals. In the world of industry, we're colleagues. On the world's stage, we're close relatives, but in dance music Chicago and Detroit are the kind of sister cities that finish each others' sentences.

But in light of the ever-increasing ability to connect with people of the other side of the planet, Chicago's been neglecting regular contact with our own next door neighbor. There was once a time when music, artists and energy traveled freely between the two cities, and this Friday, March 12th at SmartbarD3: Deconstruct, Discover Detroit Art and Music Series hopes to revive this exchange of ideas. Friday's kickoff event is only the first in the quarterly series, and Gaper's Block sat down with organizer Darlene Jackson, aka DJ Lady D to discuss her vision and Detroit's influence on dance music.

On a nippy Monday evening in late February, about young musicians are sitting inside a small room at the Chicago Cultural Center. With no instruments in the room or anywhere in sight, the artists aren't here to perform or write new songs. Instead, they're all waiting to learn the key answer to one question — How the heck do I get a gig booked outside of Chicago?

Sponsored by the non-profit Chicago Music CommissionMusicians at Work forums are held six times a year as a way to introduce artists to different ideas in the music industry. This particular panel -- about how to book out of town gigs when you're a local act -- brings together six industry experts: Brian Keigher of the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs, Scott Schaefer of Bloodshot Records, Brian Mazzaferri of the recently-signed band I Fight DragonsMo.

The Department of Cultural Affairs co-hosts the forums. Twenty-one year old Dave Cohen, who lives in Crystal Laketakes a seat near the front row.

Cohen wants to learn about the mechanics of touring because his three-piece pop-punk band — They Go Up — will be finishing their first record shortly. He heard about the event from his producer. I approached Welles Park from the west, and as I got closer the sounds of what I now know as desert blues reached my ears for the first time and enveloped my senses.

The air was full with the vibrations of electric guitar, drums, and deep vocals pierced occasionally by the trill of women ululating. Western psychedelic '60s rock of the Jimi Hendrix variety mixed with West African rhythms to create a trance-like mood, the park was filled to capacity with revelers, and outside the gates people stood on sidewalks and CTA bus benches, swaying to the music.

The sun had just begun to set, and the quality of the light hitting Western Avenue at dusk added to the feeling that I had just stepped into another dimension. On stage men and women in blue robes and dark turbans, some with their faces obscured by swaths of fabric, played guitars and drums and sang in a language I didn't understand. The open air of the summer concert captured all who came within earshot, and I was completely mesmerized.

Observation: Over and over again, Sam Cooke would attribute his success to the art of observation. He wrote of what he saw and heard.

He listened to it and spoke to it. Effortlessly and instinctively, he turned it into music. He sang the songs that brought relief to the civil rights movement. He sang the songs that formed a bridge.

He sang the songs that healed. His furious will and feral tenor brought people to their knees, and lifted them to their feet. Then, at the height of his success, he was shot and killed. It was He was only Where there are people, there is music.

It makes us feel the things we need to when we don't already. It enhances them when we do. It carries us backward and pushes us forward. It can be found in every known culture and has been performed in public since the time of antiquity. It should come as no surprise to find it being performed just a few steps beneath the ground.

After all, there are fantastic acoustics and hour audiences to be found in the tunnels below. The tunnel musicians of Chicago can be heard amid the roar of trains.

Depending who you ask, there are only four performance-permitted stops: Jackson and Lake on the Red Line, and Jackson and Washington on the Blue. Some will tell you about these four.

Some will tell you there are only three. I'll tell you what time already has: where there are people, there is music. I recently spent three nights walking through the tunnels for a closer listen.

These are the sounds, and the people I heard. The Tomorrow Never Knows Festival gets a split personality this year with the introduction of a second venue in addition to Schubasin the form of its sister brother? Featuring five days of comedy, indie rock, girl rock and soul, this little winter festival is one of the extremely affordable entertainment highlights of a very dark month each year.

Check the site for ticketing, read up on some of our picks, pull on your boots and get on out there. The festival starts Wednesday night, the 13th, and runs through Sunday the 17th. What follows is a brief preview of some of the acts you can catch each night.

More on each act and full ticketing at Schubas website. We decided that there was too much going on in Chicago music for a simple Top 10 list.

Therefore, what follows in no particular order is a compilation of superlatives we'd like to award to our favorite, or at least most memorable, Chicago music tidbits of Enjoy, and have a safe and happy new year! For the third article in an occasional series on long lost music venues in Chicago, Transmission takes a look at the Lounge Ax, a gritty bar and music venue in Lincoln Park that attracted some of the most popular underground bands in the late s and until it closed in See our previous look at Off The Alley here and our look at Medusa's here.

Lincoln Ave. An unassuming, bare-bones entertainment venue, the club was located across the street from the famed Biograph Theatre, where John Dillinger met his fate 53 years earlier. When the Lounge Ax first opened its doors, Fisher and Adams had simple, yet noble ambitions: book live music that they liked, mainly indie rock, and some comedy shows.

The Biograph Theatre. Twenty-two years later -- and 10 years after it closed its doors forever -- the Lounge Ax has solidified its place in Chicago history. Seven-hundred eight members reminisce about the "late, great Chicago club that booked the greatest bands in the world," on the Facebook group " I Miss the Lounge Ax ;" the club plays a key role in the film High Fidelity ; and the Chicago History Museum is currently asking for any objects or pictures from the club in order to document its history.

While the Lounge Ax didn't do anything completely revolutionary, it did nearly everything exceptionally well -- booking some of the best upcoming indie bands and becoming known as the club that treated all musicians with respect, even if you were just starting out.

Let's face it, the thought of listening to children's music can be pure hell. The daunting ABC's, the patronizing, boring lessons and let's not discount the numerous Raffi flashbacks that one might go through while trying to find music to groove to that is also appropriate for little ones.

Even though children's music has some shining gems, they can be hard to find and if you have children, who has the time? Chicago based musician Justin Roberts is something a bit different.

He stands out in the sea of xylophone chimes and overzealous demands to count to ten as the adult experience of kid's music can be. His gentle voice has been compared to James Taylor, his songs make you want to dance and he never underestimates the intelligent beings that children are all while nurturing the sense of wonder that many of us lose once we are too cool for play dates.

His Homolatte is a gay community event created to give opportunities for queer writers and musicians to gain exposure and showcase their talents. Bringing performers of all genres and genders to the stage for a decade, Homolatte is the longest running queer performance series in the country.

A bi-monthly, all-ages, queer music and spoken word series, Homolatte happens on the first and third Tuesday of every month at pm. Although primarily a gay men's bar, Big Chicks, like Homolatte, welcomes people of any gender or orientation. A few weeks agowe looked at the current situation of interns in the Chicago music scene.

While their optimism and good cheer seemed to bode well for the state of things, we realized that we'd need to see what the result of these many hours of free labor would provide. Did blood, sweat and promo e-mails pay off for everyone who put them in? Do the ones who end up with unsexy day jobs regret their fate, or did they still gain something? We started an open discussion with several former interns — some more forthcoming than others.

Some are now successful entrepreneurs of their own, some are still finding their way. But short of inviting this gang out for a drink at the neighborhood watering hole and hearing them yourself, here are the tales fit for print from the intern veterans of Chicago. When talking musical influences with Helen Moneyit's easy to forget her instrument of choice: cello.

She references Bob Mould's Beasterwith its wall of sound and intense, thought-obliterating guitar work. She speaks of The Who and all the crazy rock bands she was exposed to in the '80s.

And this coming from a woman with a picture of Jimi Hendrix taped to her cello case like he's a saint. The music industry primarily runs off of the hopes and dreams of millions of kids wanting to be in a rock and roll band.

Its slightly lesser known secondary source of fuel is the hopes and dreams of kids who at least want to work in a rock and roll business. All over Chicago, businesses large and small find interns knocking on their door — students, career-changers, hobbyists, and more. The West Philly trio make bouncy, incredibly catchy Ramones-inspired punk; pure pop for heartbroken people.

Eyesore by Royal Brat. Bandcamp Album of the Day Feb 28, Second Hand by Heart Shaped. Bedroom pop in the truest sense, fuzzed-out and propulsive with charming melodies, from Belfast's Heart Shaped.

The Bible 2 by AJJ. A love letter to people, and the way they are and will continue to be, for better or for worse. Bandcamp Daily your guide to the world of Bandcamp.

Jake Dieffenbach stops by to discuss his latest album and his life as a deaf heavy metal singer. Explore music. Get fresh music recommendations delivered to your inbox every Friday. Up For Nothing — In Trance Seth Timbs — Half Now Cool Ghouls — Cool Ghouls Dead Confederate — In The Marrow Orange Peels — Sun Moon Beady Eye — Be. The Blank Tapes — Vacation Mike Marlin — Grand Reveal Street Dogs — Rustbelt Nation Black Sabbath — Ep Nolan Bryan — Nolan Bryan Escondido The Ghost Of Escondido.

Good Grief — Crackle! Cd Singles Club The Roves — Introducing,, The Roves Chalk And Numbers — Parade Wintergatan — Wintergatan. Tweens — Singles Prince — Singles Axolotes Mexicanos — Infectados Misser — Distancing. Plastic Bubble — Treble Treasure Chest The Sweets — Jan. The Sweets — Hai Radiohearts — No Reaction The Bennies — Better Off Dread Sandspur City — Sandspur City Lavandera — Lavandera Songs — Malabar Santa Cruz — Elvis In Acapulco.

Relation — Places Are Everywhere The Sweets — Assorted Sweets Leon Benavente — Leon Benavente Sidewalk Atlas — Sidewalk Atlas Shannon Durch Quillen — Singles Beach Vacation — Maritime Bloomer — Demo Tropical Popsicle—Dawn Of Delight Telstar Sound Drone — Comedown Strange Relations — Ghost World The Sweets — Montequilla Mindless Attack — Mindless Attack Dw Dunphy — The Radial Night Obnox — Canabible Ohio

Mahaye - Lulu And His Boys & Girls - Zandile Jive (Vinyl, LP, Album), Momus and John Henriksson (2) - Thunderclown (CD, Album), Never Ending Story - Various - Mixing School D.J. - Point (Vinyl), Pali Gap - Jimi Hendrix - Rainbow Bridge - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (CD, Album), Moonless Night, Jade - Various - International Pop Overthrow Vol. 3 (CD), Hit That Jive Jack - Nat King Cole - Nat King Cole (CD), Nô Pintcha / Dont Stop! - To Hans Falb - Mats Gustafsson - Needs! (Vinyl, LP), Mickeys Son & Daughter - Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band - Im The Urban Spaceman - The Very Best Of The B, Its Gotta Be (Ben Macklin Remix) - The Disco Boys - The Disco Boys - Volume 5 (CD)

Jaime L. Over It. Vol 1. Truth And Salvage Co. Kitty In A Casket — Bittersweet The Woggles — The Big Beat Late Cambrian — Peach Gru — Welcome Sucker To Candyland Waldorf Histeria — Waldorf Histeria Boat — Pretend To Be Brave Treetop Flyers — The Mountain Moves Sonicbouquet — Bloom Michael Stanley — The Ride The Arteries — Restless The Solicitors — Made To Measure Bankrupt — Goodbye Blue Monday Worthwhile Way — Love Is All Envoi — Changes Teenspot — Aggressive Inline Skating The Throwaways — The Throwaways.

Ex Norwegian — Crack The Pastels — Slow Summits Stevie Ann — California Sounds Jason Isbell — Southeastern Spectrals — Sob Story Jamie Cullum — Momentum. Jimmy Eat World — Damage The Pinecones — Ooh! Westside Daredevils — Westside Daredevils Stanley Road — Spanish Art Today Citizen — Youth Rogue Wave — Nightingale Floors The Gorgeous Hands — Tender Davidson Hart Kingsbery — 2 Horses Hermanos Sancheski — Chao Chalao. Caves — Betterment The Beautifully Demolished — Beautifully Demolished Up For Nothing — In Trance Seth Timbs — Half Now Cool Ghouls — Cool Ghouls Dead Confederate — In The Marrow Orange Peels — Sun Moon Beady Eye — Be.

The Blank Tapes — Vacation Title 8, outro 2. Into Construction Boohbahs. June 15, Title 9, outro 3. Title 10, outro 2. July 5, Title 11, outro 3. Title 12, outro 2. Most Wonderful Television Boohbahs. August 3, Title 13, outro 3.

No Tickets Allowed. August 10, Title 14, outro 4. Well, Why's That? Other World War Boohbahs. September 29, Tape 15, outro 1. Potlucks Boohbahs Town Tick. October 12, Title 16, outro 4. Punky shows duckie friends to tour around the show Super Why September 3 to May 12 Call Them With Me. Say, Calling All Super Readers. To The Book Club! Sing along with 32 fun hits. Sing along with 33 fun hits.

In it, Punky dances tango with Tiptie. This also knows Kaitlin read Sappy Monkey on the trampoline. Still Round And Green. Tonight Is Tango Night. Punky teaches kids science fun it can be. Stay Inside Duckie Here. How You Doing? In it, duckie friends tour around. Good Afternoon, Duckies.

That Was Okay, Didn't We. Kaitlin wants Tiptie to have a duckie friendship to where the other duckie friends should have. Happy No iPad Day. Clover wants duckies to use your words. Manhattan Duckie Manhattan Melodies.

Clover tells her duckie friends will be the sign said no duckies allowed. The Square Song album. Based on the alphabet book Chicka Chicka Boom Boom. Thirteen songs in all. Sing, Sang, Song Singalong. Let Your Feelings Show! Join Thinkers First Grade catalogue number: title date: July 26 Join Becky and Ben in this first adventure.

Join Thinkers Kindergarten catalogue number: title date: August 10 Join Becky and Ben for a second adventure. Super Why weeknights and weekend nights at watch it 3 seasons with episodes of the show seasons 1, 2 and 3 watch and fly along. He was real disappointed that Clover is going to miss The Saddle Club when they got home.

But first, Tiptie says goodbye to Ma just for now. He and Tiptie watch Dr. Dolittle Season 1 Episode 50 story answer is Clever. Punky tours her friends around Super Why from September 3 to May 12 How Are You Doing? Clover was sharing and coloring with her friends. Same Lines Fun Remember catalogue number: title date: October 19 Clover knows here at Summit Central simply Ryan from Adventures simply actually use some lines from Disney trailers of coming attractions.

Everyone loves a great story. And now, Disney's Favorite Stories collection brings you four fun-filled classic children's stories on videocassette. First, there's adventure in every twist and turn of Mickey and the Beanstalk. It's a tall tale with a really smashing ending. Then, a-hunting we all go LP) the timeless story of Peter and the Wolf. Come along with his band of fearless friends as they set out to bag a big bad wolf.

It's a memorable musical journey and a wild pursuit that will have you rooting for Peter and his brave pals. Plus, there's lots of fun and thrills to follow in The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. He's a popular school teacher with a huge appetite for life, but when he bites off more than he can chew, Ichabod just might not have a ghost of a chance.

And there's double trouble throughout the kingdom in The Prince and the Pauper. It's Mickey Mouse and Mickey Mouse. Treat yourself to four timeless tales, filled with lots of laughs and fun. Collect Them All! From Walt Disney Home Video. What Else We Got There? Ho Ho Ho. Actually, I Love To Laugh. You Love To Laugh.

We All Love To Laugh. Now You At Home. The show is centered around Conrad Bloom, a copywriter in New York City, looking for love whilst trying to pursue his career.

Conrad has to deal with the women in his life: A mother, a sister, an ex-girlfriend, a boss and a co-worker. Conrad balances work, life, friends and family whilst trying to remember that love is out there. Previews for The Spirit Of Mickey. Patrick has confirmed this on his syndicated radio program The Dan Patrick Show. It has also been said that many of the storylines for McCall were inspired by Craig Kilborn, who was an anchor on SportsCenter during the mid s.

Previews of Dalmaitans Christmas. October 6, Three divorced men get thrown back into the bachelor life. With nothing left but each other, Michael, Phil and Andy form an exclusive club and embark on a new phase of their existence. Someday, they might comprehend the mysteries of women, love and golf.

Until then, they'll continue carrying on The Secret Lives of Men. Previews of Raymond Briggs' The Bear. Set in Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan, a detective from a working-class Irish Catholic family looks after his family members. LP) the show, he serves as the intelligent and erudite backbone of a Civil War-era White House populated by louts and drunkards. Cousin Skeeter first aired on September 1, on Nickelodeon, sharing the 8—9 pm programming block with The Wild Thornberrys.

The show focused primarily on issues that many African Americans were facing during this time period, by presenting them in a comical way via the use of Skeeter.

Skeeter frequently causes mischief, which is often balanced out by Bobby having to correct the situation. Maffeo Produced By Touchstone Television". The show wasn't popular with critics, who considered it vulgar and shouty. A review in The New York Times said, "There are entirely too many colorfully crude blue-collar characters".

The Los Angeles Times called it a more working-class Cheers and criticised Costello's acting ability. The show featured Roseanne interviewing a mixture of quirky guests along with Roseanne's signature style of brassy, in-your-face, domestic goddess comedy. The Roseanne Show was the first to be recorded digitally. During the show's run there were also live call-ins from viewers and celebrities.

Sometimes during a taping there was a webchat during the taping and after the show. The set of the show consisted of a living room, a kitchen, and a garden scene. The set rotated to present a different interview setting. The show also featured skits with audience member participation. Skits included Judge Roseanne, The Dr. Is In-sane and a dating game-esque skit. Some skits also included her producer Mary Pelloni. Throughout the show's entire two-year run, Dailey Pike was Roseanne's warmup guy and sidekick regular on the show.

She works for her overbearing father in a German-themed bar, serving beer while wearing a dirndl. Jesse's love interest, a Chilean named Diego Bruno Camposgains a rival when her former husband comes to town, intent on winning her back.

Weyman Composed By Mark Heyes". Brian was later able to return to the station as a replacement for a human interest reporter who was killed covering an ape exhibit at a zoo.

As implied by its title, the program was primarily broadcast on Friday nights, semi-regularly. The show described actual FBI cases, with dramatic reenactments and interviews with agents and forensic scientists who worked in the investigations. The show premiered on October 20,and episodes were produced by Discovery Channel Producer Tom Golden before the final original episode shown on March 24, The series covered the kidnapping and murder of Polly Klaas, the investigation and conviction of John Gotti, the Unabomber case, the World Trade Center Bombing, the Sara Tokars murder case, the several prison escapes by Christopher Jeburk, John Birges's biggest bomb in history Harvey's Casino in Stateline, Nevadaand many other well-known and less well-known true crime stories.

Possibly that to do The Ten Second Tidy with Rosita to do fun to clean up just like Molly and Loonette used to do to make things will probably tidy it up.

The series portrays an American family of wildlife documentary filmmakers known as the Thornberrys, which consist of the British nature documentary television host Nigel, his wife and camera operator Marianne, their year-old daughter Debbie, their younger daughter Eliza, their adopted son Donnie, and a chimpanzee named Darwin.

The series focuses in particular on Eliza, who has an ability to communicate with animals. The Thornberry family travels to every continent and wildlife environment in the ComVee, a recreational vehicle equipped with safety mechanisms to handle any terrain or body of water, to document their journeys in detail, with typical episodes involving Eliza befriending an animal and subsequently finding herself in peril.

The series starred Steven Williams, Pam Grier and Golden Brooks, and aired on Showtime for two seasons from to before being cancelled.

After cancellation, it was briefly syndicated on Showtime's former sister network BET. Robertson 60 Minutes Fun Show". A family-run horse farm nestled among the rolling bluegrass country provides the picturesque backdrop for Legacy, a family drama series that chronicles the proud and close-knit Logan family as they struggle to maintain their deep-seated family values of hard work and integrity in a society increasingly driven by money, power, and self-indulgence.

Hosted by Nancy Zieman, she just loves to sew as she did full of sewing fun. Sewing as it did hosted by Sue Hausmann sewing some clothes with fun to sew together. Sewing experts offer easy ways to create neat sewing projects right at home. Viewers of all skill levels learn tips and techniques for creating professional-looking garments, personalized apparel and home accents.

Weekly episodes feature various themes, and feature two main projects and one shorter technique segment. Some projects include monogramming napkins and towels; baby poncho, hooded towel and baby-friendly diapers; embellishing yoga pants with a clothing tattoo; and sewing on knits.

The series followed the everyday issues of the Blake family in Miami. Ex-baseball player Dave Blake and his artist wife Karen have adopted six teenagers of different ethnic and racial backgrounds.

The show was produced by Peter Engel Productions and ran for three seasons. Chapel was a mysterious stranger keen on serving justice to those who had been ignored by the law. To achieve those ends, Mr. Chapel made use of promised favors from former clients. People in trouble were usually contacted by Chapel with an envelope on their front doorstep containing newspaper clippings related to previous clients, along with the phone number When Mr.

Chapel took a case, his demand was simple: either pay a fee of one million dollars, or promise to do a favor at some time in the future—whatever, whenever, wherever and for however long he needed you—then your debt would be paid in full.

In the series pilot, it was clear that Mr. Chapel had been doing this for some time, as he called in a number of favors to help his current client.

A running joke throughout the series was whenever one of those former clients paid their debt to Mr. Chapel's satisfaction, he would say, "We're even. I'm out of your life. Griffin Yorka woman who worked in the district attorney's office, was the one former client who stayed after doing her one favor, and continued to assist Chapel with his cases.

Chapel made few promises. Those that he did make, he would fulfill or die trying. Though he had no compunctions about using lethal force if necessary, Chapel refused entirely to use guns.

Current clients were sent away, if at all possible, to keep them out of the line of fire and provide them plausible deniability. There are hints throughout the series that Chapel began his crusade after suffering a traumatic personal tragedy.

Program Town Hit Mr. Anderson stars as Vallery Irons, a woman who accidentally saves a celebrity and then is hired by a real bodyguard agency V. Her lack of investigation skills ends up defeating the antagonists in every episode. Coming Up. The series opens at Felicity's high school graduation, where she asks Ben Covington, a classmate on whom she has a crush, to sign her yearbook. Moved by his comment that he wished they had gotten to know each other further, she changes her education plans completely, deciding to follow Ben to New York rather than attend Stanford University as a pre-med student.

Felicity's overbearing parents, concerned about Felicity's seemingly rash decision, come to New York to try to persuade her to return home and "get back on track". Felicity has second thoughts about her decision, but soon realizes that she came not only to follow Ben, but to discover her true inner self. While Felicity works to sort out her emotions, she continues the basic motions of student life and moves into her dorm.

There, she meets the resident advisor Noel Crane. Eventually, the two develop a romantic relationship, and the love triangle among Felicity, Ben, and Noel forms the basic dramatic conflicts in the show throughout the series.

A number of other characters appear and play large roles in Felicity's life. Her roommate for the first two years is Meghan Rotundi, a goth Wiccan who occasionally casts spells on Felicity and others. Julie Emrick is one of Felicity's best friends, as is Elena Tyler, who often takes classes with Felicity. A recurring episode opener of the show is a stark camera shot of Felicity sitting in a dormitory room or apartment holding a tape recorder, recalling events in order to make a cassette tape to send to an old friend named Sally Reardon voiced by Janeane Garofalo.

This occasionally provides a method for Felicity to narrate an entire episode. At the end of episodes like this, Felicity is often shown to be listening to a tape that Sally has sent in reply. A legendary private investigator disappeared in when he was trying to solve the murder of the woman he fell in love with. Jett Jackson previously lived with his actress mother in Los Angeles, but missed his home and his friends.

Longing for a relatively normal life, Jett succeeds in getting the production of Silverstone moved to the fictional Wilsted, North Carolina, thus providing jobs to townspeople while affording Jett the chance to live with his father, Sheriff Woodrick "Wood" Jackson, and his great-grandmother, Miz Coretta whom Jett calls Nana. Keeping in touch with his mother Jules by video link on his computer though by the third season she also moved to WilstedJett now spends part of his time with family, friends and school, and the rest living the life of a working actor and celebrity.

In doing so, Jett often ends up in sticky situations, usually aided and abetted by his childhood friend, J. In the second half of the series, Jett's new co-star, Riley Grant, is added to the mix. The show within the show, Silverstone, is about a spy who works for Mission Omega Matrix the acronym being a pun on the word "Mom" in order to save the world from villains like Dr.

Hypnoto and The Rat. In contrast to Jett, Silverstone has no family, only his mentor, Artemus, and eventually his partner "Hawk" surname Hawkins "played" by Riley Grant. From the second season onward, the action sequences and Silverstone subplots became more prominent.

The relative realism of Jett's home life sometimes gave way to fantasy or paranormal elements, such as one episode in which Jett learns about a shameful incident in Wilsted's history with a little prodding from the ghost of a key figure in the buried scandal.

Other episodes dealt with issues in a more realistic and contemporary way, such as when J. Dupree, runs afoul of local attempts at censorship of a class reading assignment. Other episodes dealt with such topics as bulimia and the question of whether Jett, with his relatively sheltered and pampered home life, can truly understand or cope with the problems of other African Americans.

The series was followed by a Disney Channel movie in which Jett finds himself trapped in Silverstone's world, and vice versa. In that movie he takes on Silverstone's role for real and is able to muddle through while Silverstone does the same thing in Jett's world until Miz Coretta finds out the truth and he returns home and sends Jett back as well.

The movie ends with Jett returning to Silverstone's world and helping him complete his mission by rescuing Silverstone from Kragg and then defeating Kragg alongside his hero alter-ego. He tracked down and arrested the offender, Gilbert Jax, who was cleared of the charges. Furious, Stone then murdered Jax. Two months later, Stone was killed in an unrelated incident and went to Hell for murdering Jax. Later in the show it was revealed that it was not the killing itself that condemned Stone to Hell, but the fact he took pleasure in it.

Stone died the most decorated cop in NYC history. Fifteen years later, a breakout from Hell occurs, led by a year-old Canaanite priestess named Ashur Badaktu Teri Polo. The Devil explains that, over the centuries, a few souls have escaped and presumably been returned to Hell, but nothing of this magnitude, which includes souls. Because the Devil is largely powerless on Earth, he makes a deal with Stone: Stone will be returned to Earth to track down these escapees, and if he can return all of them to Hell before one of them kills himhe will earn a second chance at life on Earth and thus, possibly, Heaven.

The Devil seems to hinder Stone's work almost as much as he helps it, however, divulging some information but withholding crucial facts or giving only cryptic clues to where Stone will find an escapee, apparently delighting in watching him become more irritable with his interference.

It was suggested by an angel in the episode "It's a Helluva Life", played by John Glover in a dual role that Stone served God's purpose as well as the Devil's in his former life when he killed his wife's rapist. Nicki meets the daughter she gave up for adoption 20 years earlier. The show was presided over by former Nevada district court judge Mills Lane, who is more widely known for being a professional boxing referee.

The introduction to the series' Restless. Tired. Uneasy - Toby Foster (2) - 100 Ways (Vinyl season mentioned Lane's connection to both boxing and the law.

Lane's catchphrase "let's get it on" was used to open each case and if he found one of the litigants to be out of line, he would tell them that if they didn't stop, "your case is gone. The show could not find secure enough footing in an increasingly crowded market and was cancelled after three seasons. Here "S", and "W", 6. Each show consisted of three segments. At the beginning of each segment, a guest told his or her side of the story to the host. Most often, the guest was someone who had done something to hurt a friend or relative, in which case the guest hoped the other person would offer forgiveness.

Sometimes, the guest was the one wronged by someone else, and wanted an apology from the second person. Occasionally, the other person was interviewed during the segment via closed-circuit television, during which time the host usually tried to help the two sides come to a resolution.

Near the end of the segment, the guest was asked to proceed to a large door at the end of the stage. If the other person was willing to forgive or apologize, he or she would be waiting behind the door, and the two would reunite when the door opened. However, if the second person was not willing to make amends, the door would open to reveal only a black curtain on the other side. After the revelation, Mother Love would counsel the two sides. If the guest had received an "empty door," a taped response from the second person was aired, in which the person explained why he or she would not come to the door.

In later episodes, another live interview would be held via closed-circuit television, with all guests participating. Occasionally, this second interview led the offended person to change his or her mind and come to the door to reunite with the guest.

On several episodes, a guest would be featured who had lost contact with another family member and wished for a reconciliation. If the family member was willing to reunite with the guest as they usually werethey would be waiting on the other side of the door.

Here "C", and "W", Co-hosted by Mary Gallagher and Sean Donnellan, Pause consisted of jokes and skits done while watching certain episodes of game shows, in a similar fashion to Mystery Science Theater Here repeated as show : "E", and "Z", Computer expert Angela Bennett Brooke Langton accidentally receives a top secret email with information about an elite terrorist organization called the Praetorians.

Angela soon discovers that the Praetorians' goal is to take control of people's lives through the use of computers. The Praetorians become aware of Angela's knowledge of them and steal her identity, placing her new identity on the F. Angela, with the help of an unidentified person named "The Sorcerer" Currysets out to stop the Praetorians and win back her true identity while staying one step ahead of both the F.

Simply "H", and "U", The hour block of programming is focused on non-fiction books and authors, featuring programs in the format of interviews with authors as well as live coverage of book events from around the country.

Here "I", and "Z", 0. The show was based on a Canadian board game, and the show was developed as a marketing tool to help sell it. Before the bonus round, Marshall showed the game to the home audience and gave a toll-free number to order it from. Here repeated as show : "F", and "Z", 0.

Monty Title "L", And "Z", 2". InABC revived the series in a Saturday time slot. The role of Mr. Roarke was played by Malcolm McDowell and, in contrast to the first series, the supernatural aspect of his character and of Fantasy Island itself was emphasized from the start, along with a dose of dark humor. Director Barry Sonnenfeld, known for his work on The Addams Family movies, was a chief creative force on the new series. Another difference was that the new series was filmed in Hawaii instead of California.

The remake followed the fantasies of at least two of Roarke's guests with an additional subplot involving members of his staff — usually Cal and Harry. Whereas the original series featured a separate writer and title for each subplot, the new series was written as several stories but featuring a unified theme and title. The supporting cast was also expanded for the new series.

There was no attempt to reinstate Tattoo, with Roarke instead having a team of assistants — one of whom was a beautiful female shapeshifter named Ariel — who were assigned to help create and maintain the various fantasy worlds created on the island. Apparently these assistants were imprisoned on the island in order to pay off some debt or earn a second chance at lifesometimes hinting that they were in some kind of Limbo, with many parallels between the regulars and William Shakespeare's The Tempest.

It was strongly hinted that the island itself was the source of Roarke's mysterious powers as his assistants have been shown wielding its magic with varying degrees of success. Miranda, Roarke's adopted daughter, was human but grew up on the island with similar powers as well. The series was canceled midway through the season and the remaining episodes aired on the Sci Fi Channel. This version also aired on UPN. In an attempt to contrast this series with the original, the new Mr.

Roarke usually wore black. In the first episode, he picked the single black suit out of a closet of white ones and ordered that the rest be burned. Also during the first episode, an assistant came into Mr.

Roarke's office, shouting "The planes! The planes! Roarke then ordered the assistant never to do that again. Episodes of the revived series regularly opened and ended with a sequence set in a travel agency that actually books the fantasies, operated by two elderly travel agents played by Fyvush Finkel and Sylvia Sidney in her final acting role.

Roarke gave them their assignments by stuffing contracts into a pneumatic tube that somehow connected the island with the travel agency and the outside world. Simply "L", and "Z", 2. The series' main antagonists are Earl P. Sidebottom, also known as the Phantom and his rat sidekick, Ratticus. Earl is a boy genius who sometime before the series' beginning, got a "D" grade in shop class and retreated to the school's sub-basement boiler room in shame.

There, he built a supercomputer capable of altering reality, which he uses to cause chaos in the school as revenge, leaving the protagonists to stop him. The show takes place in a mysterious galaxy known as the Lost Nebula. An evil alien army known as the Shock is systematically annihilating entire worlds.

Five orphans, Zadam, Triply, Duncan, Lavana, and Ryle were separated from their families from different planets by the Shock and are sent to a strange Planetoid. Using it as their headquarters, the five orphans must band together to fight against the invading armies of the Shock. Usually play here at Summit Central that did for his Summit friends. Title Date: August 14, Tape Date May 6, Sing-along Songs Promo for end.

Jolly "A", and "P", Monty Title "E", And "N", 13". Unbeknownst to him, a race of extraterrestrials called the Gua have identified him as subject in an Alien experiment - AHX - to test human will. As part of this experiment, his life is systematically ruined, including the murder of his wife, for which he is framed.

He is the only one of the subjects to solve the riddles of the experiment and escape arrest to live as a fugitive. The Gua are among humans in the form of hybridised genetic clones and plan to enslave humanity—the first of three "waves" intent on conquering and finally destroying the human race. Constantly pursued by the police, and a strange government agency called the Illuminati, Foster discovers previously unknown quatrains of Nostradamus, which tell of three waves that will destroy the planet unless the "twice-blessed man" can stop them.

For this reason, Foster investigates strange occurrences that may have ties to the Nostradamus quatrains, hoping to find what he needs to stop the Gua. Foster and Eddie use these quatrains to understand the Gua invasion and search for any and all tools that may aid them in stopping the invasion in its First Wave. One of the Gua, Joshua, does not believe the invasion of Earth is necessary.

Although he wants the best for his people, he helps Cade and Eddie stop his people from initiating the "Second Wave" — the invasion itself, in which 19 million people will die.

That day's show's about construction vehicles. Here "E", and "N", Frankenpooh Tale. September 10, It talks about where this parody of that Frankenstein drama, that cover has Eeyore, Piglet, Pooh, and Tigger. Spookable Pooh Fun. September 7, It talks about where Pooh and his friends share as they did with their spooky fun. This marks first appearance for end label there.

March 23, April 19, Sing-along Rooftop Singing Fun. January 3, It talks about where Maria was going to read Big Bird and Mr. Snuffleupagus a story but since the Sesame Street Library is closed they instead bought a newspaper from Hooper's. It talks about where Herry Monster hosts special Fuzzy Awards.

Sing Sillier Songs Yourself Silly!. March 3, It talks about where Big Bird presents 11 silly songs. It talks about where Jackman Wolf requests favorite rock songs.

It talks about where Gina, Mike, Big Bird and the kids dance eight different dances. June 29, Johnson from Charlie's Restaurant. January 9, It talks about where Herry Monster hosts Monster Report drama. October 9, It talks about where Sesame Street celebrates their 25th anniversary. It talks about where putting down the duckie based on the song Hoots sings for Ernie. August 7, It talks about where gang on Sesame Street celebrate around the world six countries six languages.

August 15, This marks final appearance for end label then. August 13, It talks about where this first program debuted, Amy and Michael plan up their dad's birthday. Barney's Three Wishes Trip. December 10, It talks about where gang travel to the park, farm, even space with Tina's good friend Moonkin. May 21, It talks about where Barney and the gang go to the beach with their good friend Molly the Mermaid. May 20, It talks about where Barney and the gang visit the North Pole ready to spend Christmas.

June 9, It talks about where Tina had a dream they also go camping with Barney and the kids. August 18, It talks about where Barney and the gang teach the alphabet, counting, shapes, colors, songs, and more. July 7, It talks about where it was Barney's first concert but Baby Bop debuted. August 24, It talks about where Barney and the gang protect the Earth with such a sad farewell.

December 12, It talks about where Barney visits the library with his good friend Ms. August 27, Founded inEpitonic was one the first sites to offer free and legal mp3s from independent bands and labels from around the world. Music fans would spend hours digging through the site's recommendations and discovering bands they would have completely missed without the site. Epitonic lasted untilbut has remained dormant since.

However, one of the original founders and co-owner of the site, Chicagoan Justin Sinkovich The Poison ArrowsFile Recordsis being the site back is a big way, and the support has been overwhelming.

He has started a Kickstarter page for fans to help and show their support, and is planning a launch event to be held when the new site is ready. We recently had the opportunity to ask Justin a few questions about Epitonic, why it is coming back, and what we can expect. Michael Zerang photo by Gareth Mooney. The first thing Michael Zerang wants to talk about, following our initial chit-chat and coffee orders, is his new xylophone. Zerang rattles off numerous details about the instrument: made in the '30s, blonde with rosewood bars, four octaves — few xylophones made these days are that large.

It doesn't have a 'give' the way a vibraphone or a marimba does. It's like a bagpipe — it's either on or it's off," he laughs. He's practicing it for a performance he'll give today September 2 at noon, as part of the Michael Zerang Organic Unita sextet accompanying a Butoh dance troupe at the Jay Pritzker Pavilion as part of the Chicago Jazz Festival.

Of course, xylophone is not the only tool in Zerang's arsenal. Neither, for that matter, is music his only outlet for his love of rhythm. Whether thundering behind the well-oiled jazz compactor that is the Peter Brotzmann Tentet or grounding the transmissions of gentler musical aliens like his trio with Mats Gustafsson and Jaap Blonk, Zerang is an ensemble's lightning rod.

Unlike many free improvisers, Zerang possesses a rare gift — fearlessness in the face of silence. He's just as comfortable with negative space as with filling the frame. Every year it becomes harder and harder to decide what band to see during a particular hour at Lollapaloozapartly because the bands are so great, partly because choosing a band on one end of the vast Lollapalooza empire means you just won't have time to hoof it to the other end for another's set.

Here's our full preview of what to hit and what to skip at the festival. What is music like when you can't hear it? It's a question that sounds like a philosophical debate on par with trees falling in the woods and single hands clapping, but this is not a question for rhetorical amusement, it's something that audiophiles as well as hearing people in love with signed languages and Deaf culture have thought about in depth.

What is the deaf person's experience with an art form that is seemingly only valued by those with fully functioning cochleas? There is a notion that music is only heard and thus, can only appreciated by the hearing. However, deaf people have a unique and challenging perspective to music that has seldom been explored outside of deaf communities. With in the deaf and hard of hearing world, there are people not only creating music, but people who love and make music a part of their lives.

In this world, the various shades of gray are celebrated as the spectrum of deafness, from slightly hard of hearing to "stone deaf" are all part of this community. The experience of sound can be different for many people who's abilities with hearing are not clearly identified in terms that hearing people are used to.

Most assume deaf people enjoy music solely by tactile sensations, but going beyond feeling vibrations, what is the experience of music like for someone who doesn't hear or least least like we do? There are also even more photos by George Aye coming soon. In case you missed them, please also enjoy Lisa White's interviews with artists from the weekend. Blu Blockers, Ray Bans, mustaches, headbands, skimpy clothes and sweat This indie music festival has certainly turned more mainstream over the past several years of its existence, selling out quicker each year, making those beer lines ever longer, but at it's heart it's still about the music.

The theme for the weekend was definitely the heat. Temps were in the 90s all three days with the refuge of a single thunderstorm that rolled through early Sunday, but actually left things even more humid. Day one knocked the price of waters down from two dollars to one, and by day three were two-for-one. Every band's introduction included reminders to stay hydrated and keep an eye on your neighbors, pointing out the location of the first aid tent. Festival organizers were nice enough to hand out free waters to those camped in the first few rows for the evening headliners, with only one request: "Please do not throw them.

Alright already, enough about the heat. If you were there, you're well aware of how hot and steamy it was. Let's get talking about the music, there was a ton of it!

Our staff is pretty excited about the upcoming Pitchfork Music Festival. We fall under "other delights. Remember to check out all the other non-performance activities this weekend including Flatstock, the Rock for Kids' auction booth, the Coterie craft fair, and more.

Transmission writer Lisa White be bringing you daily coverage, as well as a festival wrap-up after the weekend's over from Michelle Meywes all paired with photos by George Ayebut for now, here's our thoughts on what you can hear in Union Park on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Chicago is the home of jazz and the blues. That's no secret. Going back to Jelly Roll Morton and eventually giving the world Chess Records and the Bo Diddley beat, the foundation of Chicago's music history is built almost entirely by the "blues people" who came up from the South.

But Chicago has a less-advertised but storied history with an unlikely genre — bluegrass. Yes, the mandolin and banjo-laden music often associated with backwoods Kentucky and the Tennessee hills had some roots right here.

The show is often cited as "second only to the Grand Ole Opry" in its time and was an outlet for Southerners who had recently migrated north. Monroe later became "The Father of Bluegrass," and the rest, of course, is history. Today, blues bars are spread out all over the city, but there isn't a single "bluegrass bar" in the strictest sense of the term. And while Bloodshot Records mixes roots music with punk sensibilities, there isn't a bluegrass label here in town, either.

But there's certainly a "scene. And it's not an easily defined genre, considering bluegrass is split up by subgenres and factions.

But there's a number of musicians in town — young and old, suburban and inner-city — playing bluegrass to an enthusiastic audience. Here's a look at three of Chicago's major players in the bluegrass scene and a guide for seeing the music around town. With the 27th annual Chicago Blues Festival kicking off Friday, and Eric Clapton's sold-out Crossroads Guitar Festival right around the corner, it's important to take a look at how much one of Chicago's top tourist attractions has changed since the musical genre's heyday in the s and '60s.

The Chicago blues sound is equal parts electric and soulful. It has inspired countless numbers of musicians and gave birth to rock 'n' roll. The blues is one of the purest forms of American music, and Chicago became the place to turn it on its head and make the blues its own. Some 60 odd years ago, it was pretty customary to be able to drive through Chicago's South and West sides and see an immense number of blues clubs and juke joints, such as the Flamingo Lounge, Gatewood's Tavern and The Flame Club.

Inside, one could find patrons dancing and singing along to some of the rawest, grittiest and sweatiest music the city has ever known. Smoke-filled, dimly lit rooms overcome with loud electric guitar and soulful crooning could carry on until the wee hours of the morning. Chicago blues wasn't just another sub-genre of music, though -- it was also very much a release for African Americans looking to escape the hardships and discrimination encountered in daily life. Today, the number of blues clubs in the predominantly African-American neighborhoods of the South and West Sides has dwindled significantly.

Many of the establishments that once played host to iconic blues men and women such as Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters, Little WalterJunior Wells and Koko Taylor now cease to exist, as well as the aforementioned legends that frequented them. Junior Wells c. If one could close their eyes during Chicago-based dance-pop shoegazers Panda Riot 's set at the Empty Bottle one late Sunday night in April, they'd swear that they heard the second coming.

Not of the Stone Roses, or the King of Kings himself, but of a wave of British psychedelic music that saw its artistic zenith in the late s and early '90s. Slowly, but surely, a shoegazer revival has come to dominate national critical LP), with widely known groups like Serena-Maneesh, The Big Pink and A Place To Bury Strangers all recently releasing new material and playing Chicago shows.

What isn't so known is that, based on a wealth of new material from several local up-and-comers, a revival of the aesthetic is occurring locally as well. But it's not necessarily a scene, per se. In fact, many Chicago-based participants question the premise of a shoegazer revival in the first place.

As they explain it, they simply aren't interested. Sitting in the Bottle's basement lounge before their show, Brian Cook, Panda Riot's guitarist makes a key distinction. I wouldn't say that I'm a fan of the genre.

But I think traditional shoegaze is kind of Is that too negative? For a beat, Cook thinks about the answer to his own question before saying in a matter-of-fact, yet cautiously self-deprecating tone that "I think loud guitars and buried voice is just dead in the water. I mean, it is. Towering over this river, Centennial Bridge connects these states. A few steps in from shore is the Great River Trail.

One can move along it slowly and savor it for miles. A few more steps in is the small city of Rock Island. There are streets and people. At night — voices and lights. There are bars, restaurants, businesses. Up above them both, there are engineers and magicians at work. In one room a magnificent sound is created. This is done 15 inches and one second at a time. Seven times a week, for several hours a session, for over four years this has been done here.

The tape collection has been growing. And now, one can move along it slowly and savor it for miles. Welcome to Daytrotter. Chicago has a rich history of jazz, from the speakeasies of the '20s, to a thriving community of innovators that exists today. Ratchet, taking place Monday nights at the Skylark in Pilsen, is a jazz series in the vein of Umbrella MusicImmediate Sound, and Elastic Artswhich are collectives and series in this small, but visionary creative music community.

The name Ratchet is a reference to a "machine or mechanism that can only move forward, relentlessly — like the tradition of creative music and art in general," says Ratchet founder Frank Rosaly. The tradition of jazz has always been to push the line. While traditional standards from the "jazz age" of the twenties may sound like tame oldies to us now, at the time it certainly pushed the boundaries of what was acceptable, both musically and socially.

Jazz in those days was widely considered immoral and vulgar due in part to the fact that most jazz clubs doubled as speakeasies, not to mention its connotations with sex. This four-piece, alt-country band consists of Damien Christian vocals, guitarLaura Loo vocalsShrek bassand Swede drums. Under no circumstance should one delay in checking out The Blind Staggers — their enthusiasm and determination about their music is sure to make this outlaw-country band explode.

Our intrepid staff of audiophiles headed out on Saturday, April 17, to our favorite record stores in Chicago to see what we could find. If you've got your own experiences to share, please let us know in the comments or drop us a line. A holiday for us audiophiles, Record Store Day is once again upon us. This Saturday, April 17, your favorite local record store is likely dusting off the promotional posters, putting out a brand new stack of special 7" releases, and throwing open its doors wide to a horde of eager music scavengers waiting outside the doors.

Many of the Transmission staff have been eagerly anticipating this day all year, along with many of you. There are oh, about a gazillion potential limited edition gems out there to be found, and your local shopkeeps have been working hard to obtain them from the record labels.

Keep an eye here on Sunday with a recap and snaps of sweet sweet finds at our favorite Chicagoland music shops. If you're headed out on your own, here's a rundown of some of the events and goings on. Have fun, be polite, and always tip your hat. Here's Chris Brown of indie chain Bull Moose giving you the scoop on exciting new releases to be had:.

Of course it was my idea, but still, the question came. That's when I knew I was in for a strange and beautiful ride. That's always the first sign. Music can be made in any setting, but music made on open mic nights demands the presence of strong drink, and a certain disregard for sleep. This is true for all parties involved. I knew that going in and realized some self-inflicted rules would be absolutely necessary prior to taking the plunge. One: In the interest of coherence, only one of these high-powered drinks would be allowed to enter my body and mind each night.

And three: Before it was all over, with a blatant disregard for all things sacred and good, I would also perform. That is the purpose of all this, isn't it? A free pass to perform without the burden of any shadowy shame, a sort of musical absolution — mercy for the awful, praise for the average, and an all-out adulation for the few capable of riding that high and mighty wave — the highs and lows on the open mic.

Although seemingly inauspicious words, this would prove to be the last utterance of the band Japanther before they left the SXSW showcase they were scheduled to headline. Heads down, avoiding eye contact, they made their way out of the venue with gear in hand, off to the van to continue their tour.

Left behind was the entire staff of the label who'd organized the showcase, who had brought them on for star power, who had re-arranged their running order so that they could open instead of close, and who'd also been trying to get one of the other showcase bands to show up early with a drum kit due to Japanther's lack of one.

But even with the would-be opener gone and the temperature having dropped some 30 degrees outside, the students chose to carry on and make the best of it. They had a label to run — not to mention their professor had come along as well, and this would probably factor into the grade. In the world of sports, we might be rivals. In the world of industry, we're colleagues. On the world's stage, we're close relatives, but in dance music Chicago and Detroit are the kind of sister cities that finish each others' sentences.

But in light of the ever-increasing ability to connect with people of the other side of the planet, Chicago's been neglecting regular contact with our own next door neighbor. There was once a time when music, artists and energy traveled freely between the two cities, and this Friday, March 12th at SmartbarD3: Deconstruct, Discover Detroit Art and Music Series hopes to revive this exchange of ideas.

Friday's kickoff event is only the first in the quarterly series, and Gaper's Block sat down with organizer Darlene Jackson, aka DJ Lady D to discuss her vision and Detroit's influence on dance LP). On a nippy Monday evening in late February, about young musicians are sitting inside a small room at the Chicago Cultural Center.

With no instruments in the room or anywhere in sight, the artists aren't here to perform or write new songs. Instead, they're all waiting to learn the key answer to one question — How the heck do I get a gig booked outside of Chicago? Sponsored by the non-profit Chicago Music CommissionMusicians at Work forums are held six times a year as a way to introduce artists to different ideas in the music industry.

This particular panel -- about how to book out of town gigs when you're a local act -- brings together six industry experts: Brian Keigher of the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs, Scott Schaefer of Bloodshot Records, Brian Mazzaferri of the recently-signed band I Fight DragonsMo. The Department of Cultural Affairs co-hosts the forums. Twenty-one year old Dave Cohen, who lives in Crystal Laketakes a seat near the front row. Cohen wants to learn about the mechanics of touring because his three-piece pop-punk band — They Go Up — will be finishing their first record shortly.

He heard about the event from his producer. I approached Welles Park from the west, and as I got closer the sounds of what I now know as desert blues reached my ears for the first time and enveloped my senses.

The air was full with the vibrations of electric guitar, drums, and deep vocals pierced occasionally by the trill of women ululating. Western psychedelic '60s rock of the Jimi Hendrix variety mixed with West African rhythms to create a trance-like mood, the park was filled to capacity with revelers, and outside the gates people stood on sidewalks and CTA bus benches, swaying to the music.

The sun had just begun to set, and the quality of the light hitting Western Avenue at dusk added to the feeling that I had just stepped into another dimension. On stage men and women in blue robes and dark turbans, some with their faces obscured by swaths of fabric, played guitars and drums and sang in a language I didn't understand.

The open air of the summer concert captured all who came within earshot, and I was completely mesmerized. Observation: Over and over again, Sam Cooke would attribute his success to the art of observation. He wrote of what he saw and heard. He listened to it and spoke to it. Effortlessly and instinctively, he turned it into music. He sang the songs that brought relief to the civil rights movement.

He sang the songs that formed a bridge. He sang the songs that healed. His furious will and feral tenor brought people to their knees, and lifted them to their feet. Then, at the height of his success, he was shot and killed. It was He was only Where there are people, there is music.

It makes us feel the things we need to when we don't already. It enhances them when we do. It carries us backward and pushes us forward. It can be found in every known culture and has been performed in public since the time of antiquity. It should come as no surprise to find it being performed just a few steps beneath the ground. After all, there are fantastic acoustics and hour audiences to be found in the tunnels below.

The tunnel musicians of Chicago can be heard amid the roar of trains. Depending who you ask, there are only four performance-permitted stops: Jackson and Lake on the Red Line, and Jackson and Washington on the Blue. Some will tell you about these four. Some will tell you there are only three. I'll tell you what time already has: where there are people, there is music. I recently spent three nights walking through the tunnels for a closer listen.

These are the sounds, and the people I heard. The Tomorrow Never Knows Festival gets a split personality this year with the introduction of a second venue in addition to Schubasin the form of its sister brother? Featuring five days of comedy, indie rock, girl rock and soul, this little winter festival is one of the extremely affordable entertainment highlights of a very dark month each year. Check the site for ticketing, read up on some of our picks, pull on your boots and get on out there.

The festival starts Wednesday night, the 13th, and runs through Sunday the 17th. What follows is a brief preview of some of the acts you can catch each night. More on each act and full ticketing at Schubas website. We decided that there was too much going on in Chicago music for a simple Top 10 list. Therefore, what follows in no particular order is a compilation of superlatives we'd like to award to our favorite, or at least most memorable, Chicago music tidbits of Enjoy, and have a safe and happy new year!

For the third article in an occasional series on long lost music venues in Chicago, Transmission takes a look at the Lounge Ax, a gritty bar and music venue in Lincoln Park that attracted some of the most popular underground bands in the late s and until it closed in See our previous look at Off The Alley here and our look at Medusa's here.

Lincoln Ave. An unassuming, bare-bones entertainment venue, the club was located across the street from the famed Biograph Theatre, where John Dillinger met his fate 53 years earlier.

When the Lounge Ax first opened its doors, Fisher and Adams had simple, yet noble ambitions: book live music that they liked, mainly indie rock, and some comedy shows. The Biograph Theatre. Twenty-two years later -- and 10 years after it closed its doors forever -- the Lounge Ax has solidified its place in Chicago history.

Seven-hundred eight members reminisce about the "late, great Chicago club that booked the greatest bands in the world," on the Facebook group " I Miss the Lounge Ax ;" the club plays a key role in the film High Fidelity ; and the Chicago History Museum is currently asking for any objects or pictures from the club in order to document its history. While the Lounge Ax didn't do anything completely revolutionary, it did nearly everything exceptionally well -- booking some of the best upcoming indie bands and becoming known as the club that treated all musicians with respect, even if you were just starting out.

Let's face it, the thought of listening to children's music can be pure hell. The daunting ABC's, the patronizing, boring lessons and let's not discount the numerous Raffi flashbacks that one might go through while trying to find music to groove to that is also appropriate for little ones.

Even though children's music has some shining gems, they can be hard to find and if you have children, who has the time? Chicago based musician Justin Roberts is something a bit different.

He stands out in the sea of xylophone chimes and overzealous demands to count to ten as the adult experience of kid's music can be. His gentle voice has been compared to James Taylor, his songs make you want to dance and he never underestimates the intelligent beings that children are all while nurturing the sense of wonder that many of us lose once we are too cool for play dates.

His Homolatte is a gay community event created to give opportunities for queer writers and musicians to gain exposure and showcase their talents. Bringing performers of all genres and genders to the stage for a decade, Homolatte is the longest running queer performance series in the country. A bi-monthly, all-ages, queer music and spoken word series, Homolatte happens on the first and third Tuesday of every month at pm.

Although primarily a gay men's bar, Big Chicks, like Homolatte, welcomes people of any gender or orientation. A few weeks agowe looked at the current situation of interns in the Chicago music scene. While their optimism and good cheer seemed to bode well for the state of things, we realized that we'd need to see what the result of these many hours of free labor would provide.

Did blood, sweat and promo e-mails pay off for everyone who put them in? Do the ones who end up with unsexy day jobs regret their fate, or did they still gain something? We started an open discussion with several former interns — some more forthcoming than others. Some are now successful entrepreneurs of their own, some are still finding their way.

But short of inviting this gang out for a drink at the neighborhood watering hole and hearing them yourself, here are the tales fit for print from the intern veterans of Chicago.

When talking musical influences with Helen Moneyit's easy to forget her instrument of choice: cello. She references Bob Mould's Beasterwith its wall of sound and intense, thought-obliterating guitar work. She speaks of The Who and all the crazy rock bands she was exposed to in the '80s. And this coming from a woman with a picture of Jimi Hendrix taped to her cello case like he's a saint.

The music industry primarily runs off of the hopes and LP) of millions of kids wanting to be in a rock and roll band. Its slightly lesser known secondary source of fuel is the hopes and dreams of kids who at least want to work in a rock and roll business.

All over Chicago, businesses large and small find interns knocking on their door — students, career-changers, hobbyists, and more. Transmission sits down to talk to some of them about where they're coming from, where they want to go, and what fun manual labor they've performed along on the way. Like, duh: Anyone who's paid attention to the music industry over the past five years knows that it's changing.

Last year, Trent Reznor offered up two Nine Inch Nails albums for free download under a Creative Commons License, while more notably, Radiohead self-released its album In Rainbows for a price that was chosen by each individual customer--an approach so famous that it is now simply called "The Radiohead Model. The model, it seems, works for those bands whose fans number in the millions and the number of albums they've sold add up to even more.

But in the not-so-much-a-news-flash department, even indie bands are feeling the pain of a post-label music industry: your favorite music stores continue to get steamrolled by big box retailers in smaller cities; you can now count the number of major independent distributors on one hand; and indie labels are cautiously operating.

In Chicago, there's at least one musician who is trying to navigate the future of the music industry, while cultivating a label-type community of artists. Casey Meehan, who performs under the name of Jitney, started the "netlabel" Rock Proper last November after realizing that he and his friends were putting lots of time and money into recording albums, but had few ways to get it the music out there.

Alex Perkolup is a musician who currently plays bass and guitar in the critically acclaimed progressive rock band, Cheer-Accident. Originally formed inCheer-Accident has maintained an impressively fresh and interesting sound, oscillating between noise and pop, refusing to be categorized.

The music is moody, complex, and highly composed, but never muddy. Perkolup has been one of the three mainstays in their ever-evolving lineup for six years. I started lessons at eight and went on until I was about nineteen.

I had one guitar teacher for nine years of that time who was a big influence on me. I started playing because of Eddie Van Halen. I came out of the metal school of musicianship. I was really into difficult playing and my guitar teacher recognized that. He introduced me to King CrimsonMahavishnu OrchestraGentle Giant and some progressive rock bands, so he was very instrumental in my influence. The festival that brought us reunions by the Blue Meanies and Naked Raygunamong many, many others, is back at it again with more reunited punk heroes and local talent.

Besides the five days of punk music spanning generations going down at venues around the city, they've also got a bowling tournament and film screenings planned for the week. This year marks Riot Fest's fifth year in Chicago, and each year they've only been expanding and bringing in more and more exceptional acts. For the second article in an occasional series on long lost music venues in Chicago, Transmission takes a look at Medusa's, an all-ages music and dance club that was one of the first New York-style nightclubs to open in Chicago.

See our previous look at Off The Alley here. In Chicago mythology, if you hung out just long enough Medusa's, the famed nightclub at North Sheffield Avenue and West School Street, you sure as hell didn't turn to stone. Opened in the early s, Medusa's on Sheffield was one of the defining nightclubs in Chicago's house music scene throughout the '80s and early '90s. Is that Billy Idol?

Former site of Medusa's at N. Sheffield, Chicago. Upon first hearing about this new venue up in Evanston, I immediately wrote it off because, well, it's in Evanston, and that's too far from the city, right? Then I heard that there was something very special happening there, that it was a sort of co-op for artists and doubled as a recording studio.

This piqued my interest. I contacted General Manager Jake Samuels and he invited me to the Buckwheat Zydeco show a few weeks back so I could check the place out and talk with him about the concept.

Turns out there's a lot going on under the hood. Our dear old local label Bloodshot Records is turning 15 this year and they've been partying across the country like Paris Hilton.

Setting up this weekend in their sweet home Chicago, you can catch some of the best acts from Bloodshot's roster past and present for a measly ten-spot. Plus, there's food, drink, art, activities for the kids, and yes, belt sander races.

What follows is our run down of some of the best fun to be had between noon and 10pm Saturday out in front of the Hideout. Chicagoans have a special pride for their city. Why not sing about it? The contest invites local musicians to write an original song composition inspired by our fair city.

Editor's Note: Please enjoy this guest post from Chicago area-based writer, and former radio personality, James VanOsdol. He is currently seeking backers to help fund the publishing of his book about the Chicago music scene in the 's, Chicago Rocked.

That quote is the final thought of my book, Chicago Rocked. I suppose I'm not really spoiling too much; the book technically doesn't exist yet, and there's a chance it might stay that way. More on that in a bit. Whenever I followed a trail of empty PBR cans to Wicker Park for a local band's set in the '90s, I thought, "Someone really should write a book about this era of Chicago music.

Someone should commit the stories of these amazing bands to print. Hey, wait, that someone should be me. Reviews of this past weekend's festival are slowly coming in over the wires as our staff recuperates and adjusts our eyes from the glare of the sun to the gleam of the computer screen.

Nevermind the blisters, here's our look back at Lollapalooza with further updates as bulletins arrive. Ding Ding! Imagine this: It's Sunday night at Lollapalooza. You're tired and sweaty and dirty and yet totally charged up and ready to rock.

Our team of writers has the picks of which what stages will be bliss and which stages are best to miss. Read on for more. Our fourth round of coverage gets you through the all-important early hours on the last day of this weekend's entertainment. It's a true test of the passionate festival-goer, who by that point is soggy, tired, and maybe not-just-a-little-bit sunburned.

You'll need to muster all their strength to get up out of bed before noon and head down to Grant Park, but if you do, you'll be kindly rewarded.

Day three in our previews of what to hit and what to quit at Lollapalooza this weekend. The forecast is looking hot and steamy, and so are some of these bands! Keep reading for more on our favorite upcoming stage clashes on Saturday night. Here we go with the second installment of our set-to-set matchup of Lollapalooza 's bands. Today's battles rage on as Friday and Saturday's music starts to heat up.

Keep reading for our picks on what to hear when. I've often said that music festivals are a marathon, not a sprint, and should be eased into with much pre-festival calf stretching.

That being said, we're going to give you a full week of Lollapalooza performer previews, each geared to help you choose which stage to spend your time during which set.

We're not going strictly chronological here, but we're kind of teasing it out each day this week so check back often. It is gritty and will not wash off. When holed-up in a room together, the resulting mixture becomes that much more abrasive, that much more piercing, that much grittier.

Over three weeks in early, a musical gathering took place in Nashville; what emerged was The Dead Weather. Prior to their arrival, a closer look is in order. So once again, the dust has settled on another long weekend of music in Union Park. With bass still thumping in our ears, and soy ice cream still staining our shoes, we take a look back on what the past three days held for music lovers at the Pitchfork Music Festival. For once, the weather forecast looks positively delightful for mid-July well, really, it's been nice all summer.

And it's a good thing, too, because it's once again time to head down to Union Park and enjoy a long weekend full of band after band after band at the Pitchfork Music Festival. Don't forget that the park will also play host to the Flatstock poster show, Coterie Chicago the new craft fair on the blockthe CHIRP record fair where Gapersblock will have a tableauction items benefiting Rock for Kids donated by many of the artists playing Pitchfork, and a host of food vendors and other booths.

Keep reading for our staff's picks for the best way to squeeze the most fun out of the fest. And keep an eye out this weekend as we have some exciting coverage from the Fest and after the weekend's over. Summer festival season is picking up, and with Pitchfork and Lollapalooza on the horizon, thousands of fans will pour into festival gates as the sun beats down, carrying along their sealed water bottles, blankets, and sunscreen.

But one key item will save you from boredom as you stand around waiting for your favorite band to hit the stage. A good book is a wonderful friend when your packed into a sweaty concert waiting for a show to start. Make it a book about music and you've got yourself a double dose.

Blind Justice - Agnostic Front - Live At CBGB (CD, Album), Feel So Good (Album) - Razah (2) - Feel So Good (CDr), Never Again - Loudness (5) - On The Prowl (Vinyl, LP, Album), Never Turn You In - Wigwam (3) - Lucky Golden Stripes And Starpose (Vinyl, LP, Album), Borong Sakhaa Kyyhabyn (I Am A Simple Sakha Girl) - Chyskyyrai - Vocal Evocations Of Sakha-Yakutia,, Route # 1, Box 144 - Johnny Cash - Hello, Im Johnny Cash (Vinyl, LP, Album), Bruce Springsteen - Tunnel Of Love (Vinyl), Bullshit - The Pharcyde - Labcabincalifornia (CD, Album), Delirious - David Guetta - Pop Life (CD, Album), Mind Games, Никто не узнает - Green Grey - WTF?! (CD, Album), The Human League - Dare (Vinyl, LP, Album), Private Stock - Hammer Fight - Profound And Profane (CD, Album), Diseased And Left To Rot - Black Cilice - Old Curses (Vinyl, LP)

8 thoughts on “Restless. Tired. Uneasy - Toby Foster (2) - 100 Ways (Vinyl, LP)

  1. Mar 14,  · Today, we’re pleased to bring you the premiere of Toby Foster’s new song “Restless, Tired, Uneasy” (listen below). The track is taken from Ways, which is scheduled to be released on June 2nd on CD/vinyl/digital via .

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