Always There - Various - Sax And The City - Mellow Grooves And Late Night Moods (CD)

Another 2 hours of great Blue Note Jazz from my collectionthere are lots of great Blue Note compilations available nowadays and I drive my wife mad as I attempt to buy them all.

I hope you liked it if you managed to listen on. Europe Jazz Radio if not you can catch a replay later or download the show Here! As usual comments and suggestions most welcome by commenting below or by sending me an email andysjazzshow gmail. Side Effect. Sylvia Nabors did an excellent job on the first album, but by the time "What You Need" was recorded, Helen Lowe, now gospel superstar Helen Baylor, was the new vocalist.

InLowe was replaced by Sylvia St. James was replaced in by Miki Howard. Howard left the group for a solo career in The group recruited Elaine Gibbs for its comeback album. Side Effect changed female leads with practically every album, all the while maintaining a sophisticated jazz-imbued sound that transcended the disco market at which it aimed.

That disc is herein coupled with the quartet's sophomore Fantasy effort, What You Need, on which Nabors was replaced by Helen LaRue Lowe who'd begun her recording career a decade earlier as year-old soul singer Little Helen and, after Side Effect, reemerged as gospel star Helen Baylor. Sylvia St. Side Effect reached its creative peak with the Wayne Henderson-produced What You Need, which was the group's second album as well as its best one.

This time, the songs weren't simply decent Always There - Various - Sax And The City - Mellow Grooves And Late Night Moods (CD) they were excellent, and Side Effect had a gem of a female vocalist to help bring them to life. The quartet's new female singer was Helen Lowe, who had replaced Sylvia Nabors.

While Nabors was competent, the brassy, big-voiced Lowe was a treasure -- and she shows herself to be major asset on the hit "S. Quite possibly the greatest album ever from Side Effect — a wonderful set that mixes their soulful harmonies with some killer jazz funk from Wayne Henderson!

The album may be the most perfect realization of the groove that Henderson was going for during his At Home Productions years — lots of funky fusion in the instrumentation, but all directed towards a tighter, more soul-based style — that perfect contribution that Fantasy Records made to the world in the 70s — after labels like Blue Note and Columbia first started setting things down.

Biography by Alex Henderson AMG : If the O'Jays, the Dramatics, or Bloodstone had added a female singer and incorporated bebop-influenced harmonies, they might have sounded something like Side Effect -- a distinctive soul and funk vocal quartet of the '70s and early '80s.

While they do mention their love of good times, these guys are really into it and write in a way that would please admirers of Chino XLEminem and early Jay-Z. The music doesn't rely on samples, which might be a change of pace for some at first, but they pull it off well. Add to that some well written rhymes and one may be able to really a bit of their originality. On the surface, people may also compare them to every other white rap group, whether it's Young Black Teenagers or Atmospherebut that's only surface.

Take a listen and you may find that the future of hip-hop is not so bad after all. Each member of the group have different side projects, and V-Tech is one half of Dominant Intelligencewhich may sound like a very bold statement but it works quite well. The other half goes by the name of Homeboy Face yeah,I don't know eitherand on Balance Of Power Soldies Of The Cause both of them not only rap but contribute their productions to the cause, which feature dusted samples from the crates of the unknown and their own instrumentation.

This one leans more along the lines of Slug and Eminemand what I like about them is that they not only drop verses but will do a bit of passing-of-the-mic. The humor here is kept to a minimum, as they hit a bit harder lyrically with tracks like "Terrorists In Office", "Through Whose Eyes", and the title track. The album is quite polished as is, although a few of the songs would be a bit better to me if it had a bit of grit to it.

When I hear a song of anger or protest, I don't want it to sound like Lil' Jon like. Contradictions can work, but here it's one of the few weak spots on the album.

This is how they do it in Santa Cruz, and I hope to hear more from all of them in the future. Now here's something interesting. It's a four-men crew called Oct. How good? Well, say what you want about Young Black Teenagers but they had some good songs. Some looked to them solely for their Bomb Squad connections, but they were good at what they did.

As for Oct. When they all met they have roots in Michigan, Illnois, and New Yorkthey were originally going to be a band. Their love of rap moved them into trying it out before making the move to do it seriously. There are a few songs where they do play, such as "The Crunch", and it lowered the momentum of the album a bit. They're not bad musicians, but they set up a good vibe to where it's unnecessary to divert in that direction. When they do, things tend to go downhill and I want to say "no, take it on that funky level and keep on exploring there.

When its good, the album's title represents their style quite well. When it's bad, it sounds worse than a karaoke video made at a country fair, and it's not fair to them, or to anyone who has to hear it.

Trim the crap, fine tune the better elements, and these guys may be able to make it to the surface. Outta Control is available from CDBaby. I had reviewed an album last year by Chris Schlarb that became one of my favorite albums of I was under no obligation to review it, I was just told "take a listen and let me know what you think". The word "rappers" is in their name so I knew I had to find a way to review it, good or bad.

I downloaded some sample MP3's and I was not sure what to make of it. Do I take it out of context, or do I wait and consume their music in full.

I went for the maximum full dose. I do not want to use the word "alternative" when it comes to "hip-hop" because I don't believe in that. But of course I referred to it, which must mean that there's a reason for combining them.

The music they do is not the traditional boom bap, the trademark hardcore, the overrated gangsta, or anything that even resembles anything currently playing on the radio today. Which might make some to ask the question, is this hip-hop with an electronic edge, or electronic music with a fearless respect for hip-hop?

I'm going to say it, this is some of the most fucked up music I've ever heard, and that's a good thing. Take bits of Reaching Quietearly BeckWeenHawd Gankstuh Rappuh Emsees Wid Ghatsand Kool Keithand what you get is a nutty dose of the unpredicitable, where music reference everything from rockin' Hammond organs to Merry-Go-Round sounds, oceans to radio distortion, and there's a track where everything leads to one of the best moments of the album: the sound of a turkey gobbling!

I laughed so hard I almost made some doodoo driblets. This is not music for those who want to have a predictable good time. Oh no, this album is quite good, but this is music where everything is scattered all over the place, tempos and time signatures change on a regular basis, voices are never the same from track to track, and no navigational system will help you get from here to there, you just bust out your board or scooter and wait until you see light at the end of the tunnel.

A few of the songs do not make any sense, so what's the craft in that? It's how the nonsense works within their musical circus, and yet as I began to listen to it over and over, it made more sense than Cappadonna. The Kool Keith comparison comes from simply writing in a way where it appears to sound abstract but when looked upon from a distance, there is continuity in what they do, even if it's not obvious upon first listen. It takes a lot of risks and succeeds in the process.

Whether or not they start the movement of including turkey samples in hip-hop is another story, but I'm all for it. Sean P does not play the fool, although some might take him as second rate just because.

The guy is from Texas, and as the saying goes, you don't mess with the state, and I dare you to mess with Sean P.

The guy has been making music since the turn of the century, being fascinated by various DJ's and MC's that moved him to contribute to hip-hop by making his own music.

Stiles For Miles is the MC side, and on this album he shows that he is more than worthy of being in the studio and on stage, for the simple fact that he has something to say and he wants to share those stories. My favorite track on the album is "Move Ahead", where he talks about someone who had ambition but because of hatred and fear, the guy looked inward and struggled to get himself out into the world again. The one thing that I like about his songs is that it sounds genuine, there's nothing on this that sounds out of the ordinary or far fetched, although he could create a character for himself and start doing the MF DOOM thing.

But comic book fantasies these aren't, it's more about standing positive, being true to yourself, and taking your time to do things right, which some might find shocking when so much hip-hop in the forefront is about backstabbing, breathing stale club air, and putting another bitch on the cabinet. Sean P isn't like that, he wears his emotions on his sleeve and yet doesn't come off weak, which I think is a testament to having to prove himself four times as hard just because.

I think in a way, he does it to say "if I had a chance to work with these guys, this is how I would do it", and for a few of the tracks they are a lot better than the originals. Don't believe me? Find out for yourself. Stiles For Miles and Sean P. Nomar Slevik has been making music since the mid's, and in that time has combined various sound textures and influences into something that comes off as a hip-hop hybrid of whatever you want to throw at the guy, or perhaps it's more appropriate to call it a hip-hop sponge.

The spirit of the boom bap is all over Sasquatch: The Great Dying Siqand in each of the ten tracks, where he goes back and forth from rapping to singing, he shows the kind of confidence that comes from putting a lot of time and effort into making music. What does it sound like? The sounds of the Middle East which open "Bunnyman" produced by Moshe is the perfect backdrop in a Always There - Various - Sax And The City - Mellow Grooves And Late Night Moods (CD) about searching for someone and one's self.

Slevik's flow goes back and forth from the abstract to being direct and to the point, although because of the musical backdrops and singing that he does, it might be considered anything but hip-hop.

It's hip-hop, it's indie, it's influenced Always There - Various - Sax And The City - Mellow Grooves And Late Night Moods (CD) electronic music, it's a mixture that ends up being a recipe that can be consumed as whole, while taking in the ingredients if you wish to dissect it layer by layer. There's an undeniable groove that will keep listeners moving, grooving, and maybe guessing as to what direction the EP, and Slevik's music, will go next. Jazz fans are slowly becoming aware of 3ology a trio featuring Doug Carmichael saxophoneTim Carmichael bassand Jon Powers drums.

Hold up one moment. Their self-titled and self-released debut album begins with "The Inner Mind", which begins with the kind of swagger one might find on a Prestige or Blue Note album from the 's, but with the kind of groove that is very much of the present day. About three minutes in they get locked into that groove as Doug Carmichael starts adding a bit of color into the picture, as brother Tim maintains a foundation while Jon makes sure the paint is forever flowing.

The chemistry between these guys is amazing, and anytime one of the musicians throw a curve, they each know where to go at the precise moments. Here, Jon kind of gives off that busy Elvin Jones thing where he maintains the main tempo while decorating the place with various hits and crashes which sound spontaneous it may very well be but he always gets back on track, into the groove again, Doug entering the picture and making sure to get himself a part of the conversation before the eventual end and final chime.

It's a nasty track, slinky, firm, and lush Here, Tim's bass work on what sounds like an electric fretless forms the body of the song, and one can visualize a candlelit room for two, window slightly open, an invitation for what's about to go on inside. Tim's bass almost gets close to that Stanley Clarke groove, and it is THAT type of funk that makes 3am that eternal time, the "zone", the groove, the sway to and 'fro of the magnificent mudbutt whomever she may be.

With a track like "Mudbutt" they can get very stylized but leave much room for improvisation, so one can assume that they take this a bit further in a live setting. When the three get loose, one never knows what to expect. That in itself might leave some jazz purists to leave them alone but for the jazz adventurous, this is what I'd call "perfect imperfection".

In other words, nothing is perfect, but there's nothing like hearing a group knowing how to play and play well, and in the process taking the listener and spectator for a ride. The album does sound like a high quality live album, but it was recorded in the studio. I love the sound captured by Heath Hardesty in this, everything sounds right, you hear the musical qualities and dynamics, and one can almost feel the chemistry and vibe going on.

When one feels the vibe, the only thing they can do is see and witness the music themselves. I hope they take their music on the road and gather up a lot of fans in the process. The debut from 3ology is available from CDBaby. Basis Room40 is the assembly of various sounds, layered and mixed together to create something that sounds similar to what some have called click hop, but more along the lines of what came before that.

There's a lot of electronic drone slices, and within that he creates these incredible tones and sounds that could be considered electronically meditative, truly becoming more than the ghost in the machine. It's lively, but not in a dancing sense. Hearing the songs here is like watching a plant come to life on film, it takes awhile but you take everything in and things begin to develop in front of your eyes, or at least whatever images are conjured up in your mind.

The interludes here are a little over five minutes in length, before it delves into lengthy trips such as "These 1" going over 17 minutes and "Falter" which takes 20 minutes to do.

The recordings that are a part of these songs are at times manipulated beyond recognition, and that's a part of the joy of hearing Basis. Basis is available from Room Melodic electronica? Dreamy new age? A mixture of both? For Spain's Fernando Charroit was a time for introspection, and he wanted to express some of the things he was going through via paintings and music.

Both are blended together in his new release, LiVertadwhere he explores the links between himself, the world, the universe, and life as a whole. This is not electronica, no heavy or booming beats of any kind, but electronic music in the vein of Tangerine DreamMike OldfieldJean Michel Jarreand Isao Tomita. The first track, "La Noche de los Tiempo", could easily be mistaken for music from one of Tomita's albums from the early to mid's, with that same type of mystery that somehow makes the synthesized sounds speak as if it was a human voice and perhaps the point.

I've always been a fan of this style of music that takes you on a journey. Even though there are ten tracks listed, it could be one song divided by ten, and what I'm trying to say is that while this album can be played track by track, to get a feel for what Charro is trying to accomplish, listen to it in one sitting. The cover art makes it out as if the music is meant to be listened to in a dream state, or maybe our existence is nothing but a dream.

Regardless of the inspiration, LiVertad sounds like a celebration of the mysteries of life, what came before us, and what will exist once we're gone. A very emotional and satisfying piece of work. LiVertad is available from CDBaby. Cuba is Pedro Alfonso 's link to home, and he honors his home and culture through his own music, a mixture of jazz and Latin sounds through the violin.

Strings To Your Heart is an album that makes an attempt to pull the heartstrings for the benefit of maximum enjoyment. The guy is an incredible player, at times moving into worlds that would be perfect for smooth jazz, but doing a lot of complex work that would work on the NPR side of things. Inbetween all of this beauty, he offers a political statement of sorts with "Oil For Fools", the title of which should be self-explanatory.

If you pay attention, you may hear distant sounds of the Middle East within his playing mixed in with a bit of Americana, and one can only laugh at the fools and hope for optimism in the years to come.

The series finale of The Sopranos has brought to the forefront a renewal of appreciation for the music of Journeyalthough the group's music has never left us. Here, Alfonso covers "Open Arms" and honors the original with style and grace. Alfonso plays with power with fluidity, never once letting anyone down with what or how he plays, a very remarkable recording. The liner notes state that she was originally trained in classical, and you do hear that in some of the songs, as well as the bubbly vibe that comes from performing in musical comedies.

I'm sure she does all of this and then some in a live setting, but you can sense she's a grounded artist with a voice that will impress anyone. Fascinatin' Rhythms will be released through Rhombus Records. Howard Britz 's calls his music contemporary acoustic jazzand at a time when some forms are jazz are watered down to the point of being a Fruit Stripe gum soda, this definitely means something.

His statement, or I should say eight statements are made on Here I Stand Tee Zeeand the declaration: jazz in its truest form while looking towards the music's future. Britz plays the stand up bass, and like many of his contemporaries before him, he writes and arranges his music, as it should be. His knack for getting into the groove whenever possible, and by doing this being the focal point while allowing his musicians to live and breathe in the music, is a testament to what he is as a musician and artist.

The music on here has the feel of jazz from the 50's and 60's, so those who may like their bebop and hard bop traditional will find all of that here. But within these tracks one is able to hear a few ECM influences and the occasional push into something soulful and funky, although it's not as upfront as one might thing. While everyone is on equal terms here, Britz allows himself to shine on his own with the opening bass riff of "Martha's Song", in honor of his wife.

The horn section of Benjamin and Smith sound as sharp and polished as any good horn section should, and Colligan's piano work has the kind of style that sounds too good to be true, or as people might say in Hawai'i, "da bugga is mean! Here I Stand is an outstanding album, and Britz is one of many jazz musicians Always There - Various - Sax And The City - Mellow Grooves And Late Night Moods (CD) who are continuting to break down the time barriers, which is another way of saying that with jazz, there should be no limits.

Ashia is a singer, songwriter, and cellist. For some that might mean a road to quirkiness, and in Ashia's case it's not a bad thing. Pay To Be Loved self-released is a wonderful 6-song EP which shows how expressive she is on the vocals and with the cello, where she can be happy, melodramatic, and dark all within a few minutes.

Her singing tends to be on the Regina Spektor side, where it might sound child-like at first, but becomes much more as you turn every corner with her. While having a cello might seem basic for some, she manages to bring the listener into any motif she feels like creating, be it jazz, pop, classical, or something that might be considered a scatterbrain hop, skip, and a jump to the next song and that Always There - Various - Sax And The City - Mellow Grooves And Late Night Moods (CD) meant as a compliment.

You see her and might think of a variation of a Vanessa Carlton but if this is pop, it's more of the Bjork and Feist variety, not Jessica Simpson With the range of music she plays here, she could easily do a country song, move right into some light punk, and perhaps do what Elvis Costello did with The Juliet Letters.

But she is her own woman with her own style, doing her own thing in her own time, and I hope she'll be able to move up into the world for everyone to hear and appreciate. It is said that thousands of people moved from the East and Mid-West to the West for a new life, but many stopped on their journey at the point of exhaustion.

With this comes a transfer of upbringing, culture, and music. The Grizzly Owls are a duo who take on some of those passed on traditions, but sometimes things get lost in translation, as By Night On My Bed shows. The eight songs on this EP combine the sharpness of the old country with a need to modernize things with 80's default keyboard beats and Poster Children -type angst. Imagine if Grey DeLisle decided to do some kind of smoky new wave, and you have a good sense of what Jenny Andreotti sounds like vocally.

Not quite Julee Cruise but just as eerie. I think what gets to me is that sometimes their union is offset by the other. The vocals can come off strong but the music doesn't sound quite right.

Other times the music is the perfect soundtrack for getting drunk and overdosing at an anonymous motel with multi-colored carpets which are there to disguise the stains, but the vocals throw everything off. Half of the songs here are really good, while others have a few missing piees in the puzzle, or perhaps they have a beginning, middle, and end, but they aren't assembled correctly.

If anything, it shows that while some place limits on the definition of country music, Americana has become a place to explore strange new worlds, not unlike America itself. Need more music from couples? Here's another one.

Flavors of funk, jazz, and Latin blend effortlessly, showing Bobo in his purest form where he was in full control of his musical direction. A nice touch is the panel in the CD booklet with all the family photos. My only quibble is the lack of personnel credits for the backing musicians. Overall, a great addition to the Bobo cannon!

Posted by djbongohead at AM 1 comment:. I wanted to show the actual Latin album covers that I put in my book, but expand on that and fill a whole gallery space with it. The opening was great fun - many friends came, as did fans of Latin music and dance, and several musicians and designers. Manny Vega, an incredible visual artist and a very deep individual, was there - he's done several great covers over the years for the Shanachie and Ryko Latino labels.

Orquesta Dee Jay is a cult 'salsa dura' band that I had no idea was so popular among collectors - I just knew Always There - Various - Sax And The City - Mellow Grooves And Late Night Moods (CD) guys in their later lives. There was another exhibit on at the time in the larger part of the gallery that was great too.

Here are some pictures of the opening and the show. I also went back to the gallery mid-way through the show and we did a dance party with some of the same DJs and that was a lot of fun! In the end, the exhibit ended up being on the Latin Grammy program that year, shown briefly during the bit where Milly Quezada was talking about New York being a major center for salsa.

That was a nice surprise! Many album covers have fascinating stories behind their creation. Some well-loved examples of Latin LP jacket design will be sure to inspire feelings of nostalgia, but others will speak to universal concerns as well.

And my personal rememberance is comic books. And copying art from comic books. So I was always very visual that way. And then my choice in career came. I taught myself how to read music, and I performed on stage in elementary school. When I was in seventh grade, in junior high school, they put me in a special music class. When I looked at my schedule, there was no art. So I went to the grade advisor, and in the seventh grade is when I made my decision in life, in a sense, because they said you are either in the special music class or the special art class.

So rather than have no art, I went to the special art class. So I took the special art class for three years with my neighborhood childhood friend, Walter Velez. It was in the South Bronx. We did a lot of different projects. We made puppets and all kinds of stuff. And again, my performance was always there because I performed in a puppet show, and Walter and I teamed up then, and at that time, Mad comics had come out, and one of the characters was called The Lone Stranger.

And so I made a puppet named Pronto, and Walter was the Lone Stranger, and so we put on a show, and we made sets, and all that kind of crap. So when I went into high school, Walter and I both dressed that way as well, and we got into a lot of trouble because of it. When I went into school, we took our entrance tests, because you had to pass these tests and all that. I came out reading second year, 2.

We grew up in a shitty neighborhood, you know, in a fucked-up school system, but books and the library saved my ass. I was looking at all the art books and how to draw books, and all that other kind of stuff.

I never liked modern art. I never liked Cubism and abstract and everything else. But Surrealism, yes, because it was subjective, it had realism, and of all the surrealists, my favorite was Salvador Dali, because Magritte, who I liked also, his surrealism was a little more crude. It was very important to me. So being on stage, and doing art work, those are conflicting expressive art forms. Because usually artists and writers are loners who create all by themselves. But I always also wanted instant gratification and art is something that you do alone, and then, later on, somebody will like it or not like it.

The clean, geometric lines of the striking cover artwork contrast sharply with the stereotypically fanciful prog aesthetics, its bright blue and red hues identifying the two main US political parties, separated by an apparently unbridgeable gap. From a musical point of view, the main ingredients that made "Narrow-Caster" such as successful example of modern crossover prog do not disguise the intricacy of the instrumental fabric and the frequent changes in tempo and mood.

George Dobbs' authoritative voice is assisted by gorgeous, layered vocal harmonies reminiscent of early Yes or even The Beatles that complement the lush instrumental interplay. The double-guitar configuration, with new boy Eric Pseja flanking founding member Patrick Kliesch, has undeniably beefed up the sound, though as a whole "The Long Division" comes across as a smoother-sounding effort, less reliant on high-powered riffs and more focused on Dobbs' keyboards.

The 10 songs on "The Long Division" are arranged in a pattern that alternates uptempo numbers with more laid-back ones. The mellotron-infused "Exit Strategy", with its airy, orchestral feel, is dominated by vocals, though Robert James Pashman's strong bass lines well complemented by new drummer Aaron Nobel emerge prominently. The bass is also the undisputed protagonist of the funky, exhilarating "The Socio-Economic Petri Dish" - sounding like Yes probably would if they had been founded in the 21st century, and displaying the band's collective talent in both the instrumental and vocal department.

The second half of the album opens with the hauntingly romantic, piano-led "A Work of Art", the only song dating back from the early incarnation of the band, enhanced by sax, flute and mellotron and featuring an unusually subdued vocal performance by Dobbs.

Things pick up with the slashing riffs and hard rock vibe of the Rush-influenced "Televised", driven by Pashman's fat, groovy bass line and Nobel's muscular yet intricate drumming, the heaviness softened by the Beatlesian flavour of the harmony vocals.

The short, gentle instrumental "The Millions of Last Moments" prepares the listener to the album's grand finale? With "The Long Division", 3RDegree prove that they have reached their full maturity as a band, delivering an intelligent, well-rounded example of modern progressive rock. Avoiding the bloated excesses of many retro-oriented bands, "The Long Division" is a complete package of classy music, top-notch vocals and thought-provoking lyrics?

When this album came out four years ago in tandem with the Presidential Election, its relevancy could not be understated. Init seems that this album is just as poignant as ever -- a testament to both its genius and its resilience, at least from a topical perspective.

We're just on the cusp of another presidential election, that several month run to November when it will be impossible to avoid the whole mess. It's either a brilliant time to release an album about the fractured nature of American politics or a sure fire bet to piss off a good hunk of the fan ba It's refreshing to find once in a while among all the bombastic modern prog a band that sounds restrained, smooth, with a bar music feel. This is an album that draws its influences not as much from British prog but rather from the primary sources of Ameican rock another modern band with such an To my ears and sensibility, 3RDegree's The Long Division is exactly the kind of prog album this decade needs.

The band couples great musicianship with infectious hooks, adding clever, socially conscious lyrics and a healthy dose of lush vocal harmonies. Not only are the individual songs strong on th I really regret dragging my feet on getting this but I have been in a lull of not buying music.

I listened to it for the first time in the car just after it arrived was greatly impressed. My wife commented that it had been awhile since she saw me with that big a smile on my face while listenin Great example of prog rock's various best known characteristics put to use to create an album that can really be enjoyed by those who have no idea what prog might be as a genre.

Is the album chock full of virtuosic passages-no-but they are so welcome when they find their way into really well con Heavy and deep in parts, syrupy sweet at others, the album is like a good book that's hard to put down. It ho In a genre where lyrics often are thrown away or deal in fantasy, 3RDegree instead release a relevant album in a US election year that doesn't tell you who to vote for but rather marvel at the ridiculousness of it all.

Because of this, "side two" can possibly be overlooked but there I've been following this band since their release "Narrow-Caster", which I liked a lot. Since then, 3RDegree have been hard at work on their follow-up, which was released in September In a landslide of strong album releases in and how come the know-it-all Mayans didn't predict that?

One way is by refining what they do down to its purest essence; I've always liked the songwriting, but I haven't always liked the recording quality, particularly the guitars, which I felt sounded too "synthey" yes, that's a word.

On this album, though, I th A couple of months ago I purchased this album in preparation to go and see a local concert with 3RDegree being the opening act.

Unfortunately, they were unable to perform but what I was left with was having purchased my favorite album of The moment I put this in my cd player a howling guitar Consisting of many references to the American political system and released in the final months of the presidential contest, it really works as a critique of the game the political parties play r File somewhere between Echolyn and Rush if you've never heard the band before.

But there's something else with this disc and band. I can't explain it, it Greetings from northern Vermont, I got a copy of 3rd Degree's "The Long Division" a couple weeks ago, and have been more and more impressed with each listen.

Even the first time through, several songs jumped out as being great:; but with any recording as intricate and ambitious as this, Well these guys have really found their sound on 'The Long Division' if you enjoy your music to be a bit challenging but very rewarding this new album is a must. VERY well mixed giving loads of space for every instrument and the topical lyrics carrying their social observations on modern society You must be a forum member to post a review, please register here if you are not.

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. Please consider supporting us by giving monthly PayPal donations and help keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever. Latest members reviews When this album came out four years ago in tandem with the Presidential Election, its relevancy could not be understated. You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing use forum credentials. Cocktail Lounge Labels: chilloutlo-filounge. Valdi Sabev - Impressions: Volume One Labels: ambientdowntempoElectronic.

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While the general population may consider her a "mere" one-hit wonder, her music and voice have always showed that she is much more than that, which is why so many people have cared for her for five decades. Judging from the youthful photos of the modern day Payne, she's not about to rest just yet. The new one will have better and greater distribution, which means that you'll be able to find it at your local shindigs or local online merchants of choice.

Braille also plans on touring this year and he's bringing his family, so if you plan on seeing him on the road, don't be afraid to say hello to the wife and their daughter. They will also be blogging their adventures, which you can read by clicking here. Lots of good stuff happening for him and the HipHopIsMusic collective, and very soon you will also hear the collaboration him and I did, the appropriately titled "I Feel". The MuAmin Collective are up for a Free Times Music Award in the hip-hop categoryand you can vote for them to help push them to the top.

Click here for more information. Obese Records have just signed Australia's Spit Syndicateoffering the world a chance to hear hip-hop from the land down under. The album is due out during the first half of Ubiquity Records is still very much in the vinyl game YES!

The songs are described as a mixture of reggae, dub, and African good life. Only copies of this 45 are being made, and after that you can find it through collector's circles.

Buy in triplicate, which you can do directly through Ubiquity. No Kids are getting a slow buzz these days, if you've been curious about their sound, you can download this free MP3 called " The Beaches All Closed ". The song is taken from their forthcoming album on Tomlab called Come Into My Housedue out on February 19th, so give them body.

The band Frog Eyes recently completed work on their first video, for the song "Idle Songs". You can take a look at it by heading over to YouTube. Find out, as the MP3 can be found here. Click here for a listen. The Alchemist did a track with Metafore called "I'm A Beast", you can hear the results by clicking here.

You can view this by heading over to YouTube. The great folks at Daptone Records have been known for their brand of soul, funk, Latin, and African music, all newly recorded. But after having a lot of success in recent years, they're now expanding with a reissue division, Ever-Soul. Judging from the first release, a 45 by Hank "Soulman" Mullen no relation to Soulman from Phillyit seems Ever-Soul will be the place for the funky and obscure, which is how vinyl junkies like it best.

You can pre-order your copies directly from Daptone. Most of the United States is as cold as flock and floosh, and rather than download porn, you should get into your shacks and make some music.

Speaking of recording, if you are a producer, engineer, or musician, you'll want to mark June th on your calendars so you can plan a trip to New Orleans for this year's Potluck Audio Conference PotluckCon. This is the convention formerly known as TapeOpConand there will be many panels and workshops, along with a live recording and mastering studio so you can take your music there and have it professionally done or learn a few things or two.

Registration for the conference and special hotel rates are now open. If you have your own recording setup at home or have a professional studio, and are looking for people to "talk shop" with, I highly recommend the magazine known as TapeOp. Each issue features technical information, and interviews with producers, engineers, musicians, and those who create the circuitry.

There are also equipment and music reviews, so if you need to tweak your current project and every other magazine hasn't moved you in the right direction, TapeOp may be able to give you the push you need. Their website also has a forum, so you can inquire in real time. Is there more? For now, that's it for this week's edition of The Run-Off Grooveand as always, there's more I didn't get to. Return next week and we'll do this all over again.

If you have music, books, or DVD's you'd like for me to review, you can contact me through my MySpace page. Posted by John Book at AM 2 comments:. I am John Bookwelcome to the show. This week is not as jam packed as last week's column, but reviews we have nonetheless.

The hip-hop quota was not met this week, and since I received Joe Budden 's new project yesterday, it wasn't enough time for me to do a review here, but next week for sure. Okay, let's begin. Liquid Weeld is the name of a Japanese duo who say they are "sound artists". They combine abstract composition with experimental assembly and come out with something that will appeal to those who enjoy the more eccentric side of Bjork 's music.

The pacing, and the space between various sounds, is very deliberate, this isn't music that you can casually listen to and hope for instant gratification. That's the beauty of Liquid Weeld, and with tracks with simple titles such as "Reed", "Lotus", "Fennel", "Anise", "Olive", and "Silk Tree" you have to take it in like an autumn day, each leaf falling wherever and you patiently wait for it to land.

It's very much music similar to being in a dream state, and like many of those which are pleasant, the listener will want to hang out and visit for awhile. Remarkable stuff. Akira Kosemura is a pianist from Japan who likes to explore her music with a passion to experiment. It's On Everything Someone Good may seem like a casual solo piano piece, especially after listening to the opening track "Orgel"which sounds as if Kosemura is out in the rain as synthesized raindrops fall.

It's not electronica, but you can hear that there is interaction in the machine and it's not exactly computer generated. Her playing is extraordinary, but her sound composition is an added feature as well, as she puts herself and the music into different audio scenarios where everything reacts to each other perfectly.

It's On Everything is indeed a solo album and I for one plan on hearing her music for years to come. I would not mind hearing her collaborate with other musicians, if this is something she is into and I'm sure she is. Always There - Various - Sax And The City - Mellow Grooves And Late Night Moods (CD) then, this is a fascinating album for anyone who enjoys hearing brilliance in the 21st century.

Who are these Aster kids, and why should I or you care? Well, if you are into dreamy pop with hints of rock in there to give the music a much needed punch every now and then, Some Things Seldom Heard Of self-released is for you. Despite their huge, massive sound, Aster is only a duo, but it shows what can be done in the studio if done properly. They mix the traditional guitars, basses, and drums with various electronics and gadgets to create something that is actually more accessible than that basic description, and I think that's partially due to a combination of the force of the music and how the lyrics tell a story that is worth learning about, understanding, and remembering.

Aster can often get awash in their own cacophony, or they lay low and help color the pictures they're trying to paint. They are a variant of similar sounding bands, but are distinct enough to set themselves from the pack, which I feel is important in a marketplace that tends to be clustered by bands who are there merely to fill the void.

Aster is a band that separates them from the cluster. For sample-happy worshippers and fans of musical thievery, Negativland can easily be in anyone's Top 5 if not top two. Their brand new DVD will definitely please as many fans who may be disappointed that their favorite audio collages have been given the visual treatment. Our Favorite Things Other Cinema is a three hour DVD featuring various Negativland songs put into video form, most of which are very creative and honoring the Negativland lifestyle.

This includes clips for "Gimme The Mermaid", "U2", "Time Zones", "Freedom's Waiting", "Yellow, Black And Rectangular", "Over The Hiccups" the audio is taken from one of those Recordio-type one-off records of a little girl singing, but the visual representation is anything but charming, which what makes its effectiveand the videos over their issues with Pepsi are soon-to-be classics.

Now, as someone who loves audio Always There - Various - Sax And The City - Mellow Grooves And Late Night Moods (CD), there are a few piees on here that come off as second rate because what makes these pieces work is how the audio is cut-up, not to find visuals for it. Such as "Yellow, Black And Rectangular", which is nothing but basic computer animation that a 7-year old could do. No, let me take that back, a 7-year old could do better, and it's one of the only few low-points on the DVD.

The biggest highlight, and there are many, is the bonus material, which features an interview with the man known to Negativland aficionados as The Weatherman. Watching the group's co-founder scrub shoes for 15 minutes before he allows anyone to enter his home is the closest thing to actually seeing the lead eyeball of The Residents without the mask and to my knowledge that hasn't happened yetbut as peculiar and quirky as he might seem, he is very much what Negativland is all about.

It is the revealing of the man behind the curtain in The Wizard of Oz, and seeing that he's a bit like one of us, but with long white hair and beard. Another great piece is Visit Howland Islandand as far as mixing up audio and video to create a new statement, this works beautifully and I wish the entire DVD was done like this. It was funny during the first two songs but got boring real fast, although I did like the use of the MC Hammer dolls to represent two of the members in the "group".

While the artwork is generic and basic greytones on whitethe music is a lot more complex and colorful, as Capone and his band display in the nine tracks on this CD, featuring renditions of Dexter Gordon 's "I Want More" and Gigi Gryce 's "Minority".

What I liked about this album is that while some of the songs here are done straightforward, Capone allows the guys Chris Mastrobattisto on sax, Matt Lorentzen on piano, and Carl Jackson sitting in on bass to do their own thing and carry the songs where they feel they need to be, without worry or hesitation, and it feels like the kind of music these guys would do in a live setting.

At times it has the feel of a Charles Mingus recording, where one can sense the presence of its leader although he himself makes sure everyone plays here with equal billing and feeling.

Unfortunately the CD doesn't come with production, engineering, or mastering credits, but the sound they achieved Always There - Various - Sax And The City - Mellow Grooves And Late Night Moods (CD) is well done. As you can tell by the title, this is the first installment of what will be a series of four CD's, and fans of jazz drummers and drumming will eat this up big time, along with those who want to hear jazz recordings that sound alive and not just slapped together.

Come in out of the cold indeed, and feel the warmth of the good vibes inside. When David Finck 's electric bass is heard along with the drums that start "I Know" on the opening track to Future Day soundbrushone can't help but smile and have a sense a personal "I Know At least that's how I felt when I played the first song and continued on.

Finck, Joe Locke vibesJoe La Barbera drumsand Tom Ranier piano sound like those jazz quartets of yesteryear that continue to get praised 30 to 40 years after the fact, when the chemistry feels right, the vibe is spot on, and the quality of the recording is sharp to where you think you can even sense what kind of drinks may or may not have been in the studio.

One of the primary reasons why the sound is up to par is that Finck himself produced it, along with executive producer Roger Davidson and engineer Darwin Bestand I mention this because everything about this recording stands out as brilliant, one of those albums that you want to sit in your comfy chair and just mellow out to, or test your audiophile equipment out so you can say "my resonance is better than your resonance". Jokes aside, the music here comes from powerful musicians with a lot of experience behind them, and they play here with the kind of intensity and sophistication that displays the class that jazz fully deserves.

Even in old chestnuts like "Nature Boy", " Wayne Shorter 's "Black Eyes" and Cedar Walton 's "Firm Roots" they bring new life into it and make it appear as if you're hearing them for the first time. But that's the greatness of jazz, being able to reinterpret the familiar and make you scratch your head in wonder. I honestly wish more albums would come out sounding like this, and I hope the label will consider releasing this as an advanced resolution DVD-A disc.

This is that good. Keith Marks has taken his masterful musicianship of the flute around the world, and with Foreign Funk Markei he demonstrates why he is one of the best flautists around. For some, the flute has had a good and bad reputation in jazz. It was an instrument one didn't expect to hear, but with people like Herbie Mann and Yusef Lateef bringing it into the mix and developing its own unique voice, the flute became something that more artist wanted to bring into their music and compositions.

I'll admit, when the album began with a cover of Harold Faltermeyer 's "Axel F", I was a bit concerned. It's a pop song, a hit one at that, and at first he played it as is.

As the song moved on it was noticeable that Marks was trying to do something more than just a direct cover, otherwise it would be nothing more than smooth jazz fodder. All of a sudden, he steps off of the song while remaining in it, and it showed me that this guy wasn't about to make this album in cruise control. The song goes for and about a minute before the end, he starts doing that breathing thing, where he catches his breath in between notes.

As I've said before, I've always been sold by that sound, and I don't know why, I guess it's adding a human element as if to say "I'm here" and perhaps this album could be something good.

It was more than something good. There's no reason to pass this up at all, and he also takes time to introduce two original compositions, "Patsy" and the title track. Sample heads take note. Foreign Funk is available through CDBaby.

Hendrik Meurkens first heard jazz music as a teenager growing up in Hamburg, Germany, or so his bio says. From that moment on he was hooked, and through a lot of listening he discovered Toots Thielemans and seeked the harmonica as his own. As with many jazz explorers, he found himself discovering, enjoying, and embracing the music of Brazil.

Meurkens continues his love of jazz and Brazilian sounds with his new album, Sambatropolisalso on Zoho. Meurkens' main instrument here is the harmonica, but he also plays the vibes on a few of them too. When it comes to the harmonica in jazz, the instrument has generally been reserved for the chosen few, and with this album he may become a part of that elite club, with the kind of playing that shows professionalism without going overboard.

Meurkens' appreciation is obvious and the music sounds as native to him as anything else, and the musicians sense that by giving it their all. He offers a number of original pieces too, including "Ocean Lights", "Hot And Stuffy" the music on the album is hot indeed, and anything but stuffy"Choro Da Neve" and the title track, which could easily be adapted by others and become standards in their own right. Whether it's romantic ballads or eager dance numbers, there's nothing on Sambatropolis that is bad.

Not one song. Played with precision, the recording, mixing, and mastering is top notch, fans who love Latin jazz will find every reason to buy this and pass it along to friends. If Sambatropolis was a real city, we should all pack up and live there. Sambatropolis is available through CD Universe. Olivia Block is a new name and artist to my ears, and she is an artist and composer who likes to combine the "authentic" sounds of "real" instruments with the "natural" sounds in life that are often not considered musical.

She does this by both playing them in real time and allowing modern technology to mess with the process, and in Heave To Sedimental she creates a three song sound collage that will reveal different things with each listen. In the two part title track you hear everything from glass to rain, and what sounds like fire. But sounds are sped up, reversed, slowed down, played within, mixed in the forefront, she Always There - Various - Sax And The City - Mellow Grooves And Late Night Moods (CD) everything to perhaps confuse the listener but not quite.

Most of the sounds come in and out of the mix like random thoughts, such as the sound in "Heave To Part 1 " that sounds like an incoming truck pressing on the car horn, or how some elements come off like trying to tune into a distant frequency on airwaves unknown. Musicians are credited with instruments, including Block, credited as the cellist, and while you do hear instruments throughout, they're not done in a traditional way and you never know when they'll be played. In "Make The Land" you'll have to be sure that there are no other sounds around you as you listen, so you can concentrate on the unveiling of each sound.

Perhaps Heave To is one way to acknowledge the everyday sounds we ignore because we have our radios, CD's, or MP3 players blaring loudly, and Block is allowing us to take that in for 35 minutes. Or perhaps it's nothing more than a creative mind trying to work wonders through the power of sound. I think it's a bit of both.

Heave To is available through SquidCo. The title "Runs Toward Needles" in some way represents the artwork a bit, what looks like a bunch of little lines scribbled as if it's a fabric, thumb print, or a tree limb, but up close at x. It is this burst of confusion that may make you want to understand Sillagebut don't look to understand. Look to listen, and listen to observe.

Both Murray and Nehil bring in found sounds and create them at the same time, and combine them every now and then to make sounds that could be the source of sound effects to a bizarre film of submarine dynamics.

In a piece like "Clothes Tear" one doesn't hear clothes or tearing. For the first half of the sound you hear a lot of electronics twisting and turning to be heard, and then it heads underwater, maybe to find that sonic submarine.

Then with perfect timing, something begins to rise. At least that's my interpretation of it, and in truth it's nothing more than collaborative sounds that make an effort to speak to each other while having its own voice be heard and known. The 8-track album has to be heard in full from start to finish, since some tracks contradict each other in sound, sometimes they contradict within the same track. One part may sound bright and open as if it's some vehicle riding on the beach as water comes to shore, and then you're in outer space.

I go back to the needle theory, and perhaps that if there is some sense of logic to this, the needle has to be found. But perhaps the portrait Murray and Nehil are trying to present is about all of the needles, and that if you're going to dive in, you'll bleed a lot.

If you venture in, bring rubbing alcohol. Sillage is available through SquidCo. What happens if you enter an album, knowing that it's called In Six Parts Sedimentalthere are six tracks, but they are all untitled? Good for you. Tim Feeney and Vic Rawlings are experimental explorers, as they put together ear-piercing sounds through circuitry and other elements. If a sound is achieved, they will bring it in and try to twist it around. As I began to think that the band couldn't possibly go higher than in the first song' 'Exit Strategy' brings us a perfect amalgam of vocals, great hooks and clever instrumental.

It's incredible how 3rDegree is able to combine the old Prog days without a single trace of copying that sound. They're amusingly refreshing and new to this old 'accustomed' Prog ears of mine! By the time 'Incoherent Ramblings' starts, game's over. The band got me as their newest fan. I should have been aware of The Long Division before. But better later than never! Two shorter songs follow: 'The Ones To Follow' is another catchy acoustic driven track that is just great.

Soon they're followed by the amazing Dobbs vocals here a bit like Threshold's Mac era. Superb stuff! The right amount of keyboards, two guitar players that know how to work for the song and a solid drummer, that's 3rDegree. This one is a bit more of a Pop song with a big chorus and a melancholic mood.

Finishing with a high note is always good! The Long Division has everything that any intelligent Progressive Rock fan would want: great and smart lyrics, melodic hooks all around, flawless instrumentation, superb vocals, a perfect production and the main thing ' great songs! The Long Division is all based on great well-polished songs! It's time to follow forward, pass through the first few levels of average Joes and step on the 3rDegree.

Originally posted on progshine. Compared to "Narrow-Caster", "The Long Division" ups the ante in terms of complexity, while retaining its accessible, deceptively upbeat flavour.

Though there are no epics in the conventional prog sense, the album is intended as a sort of loose concept that, while firmly rooted in the peculiar atmosphere of a US presidential election year, can also resonate with citizens of most Western countries, especially in the current global situation.

The clean, geometric lines of the striking cover artwork contrast sharply with the stereotypically fanciful prog aesthetics, its bright blue and red hues identifying the two main US political parties, separated by an apparently unbridgeable gap. From a musical point of view, the main ingredients that made "Narrow-Caster" such as successful example of modern crossover prog do not disguise the intricacy of the instrumental fabric and the frequent changes in tempo and mood.

George Dobbs' authoritative voice is assisted by gorgeous, layered vocal harmonies reminiscent of early Yes or even The Beatles that complement the lush instrumental interplay. The double-guitar configuration, with new boy Eric Pseja flanking founding member Patrick Kliesch, has undeniably beefed up the sound, though as a whole "The Long Division" comes across as a smoother-sounding effort, less reliant on high-powered riffs and more focused on Dobbs' keyboards. The 10 songs on "The Long Division" are arranged in a pattern that alternates uptempo numbers with more laid-back ones.

The mellotron-infused "Exit Strategy", with its airy, orchestral feel, is dominated by vocals, though Robert James Pashman's strong bass lines well complemented by new drummer Aaron Nobel emerge prominently. The bass is also the undisputed protagonist of the funky, exhilarating "The Socio-Economic Petri Dish" - sounding like Yes probably would if they had been founded in the 21st century, and displaying the band's collective talent in both the instrumental and vocal department.

The second half of the album opens with the hauntingly romantic, piano-led "A Work of Art", the only song dating back from the early incarnation of the band, enhanced by sax, flute and mellotron and featuring an unusually subdued vocal performance by Dobbs. Things pick up with the slashing riffs and hard rock vibe of the Rush-influenced "Televised", driven by Pashman's fat, groovy bass line and Nobel's muscular yet intricate drumming, the heaviness softened by the Beatlesian flavour of the harmony vocals.

The short, gentle instrumental "The Millions of Last Moments" prepares the listener to the album's grand finale? With "The Long Division", 3RDegree prove that they have reached their full maturity as a band, delivering an intelligent, well-rounded example of modern progressive rock. Avoiding the bloated excesses of many retro-oriented bands, "The Long Division" is a complete package of classy music, top-notch vocals and thought-provoking lyrics? When this album came out four years ago in tandem with the Presidential Election, its relevancy could not be understated.

Init seems that this album is just as poignant as ever -- a testament to both its genius and its resilience, at least from a topical perspective. We're just on the cusp of another presidential election, that several month run to November when it will be impossible to avoid the whole mess.

It's either a brilliant time to release an album about the fractured nature of American politics or a sure fire bet to piss off a good hunk of the fan ba It's refreshing to find once in a while among all the bombastic modern prog a band that sounds restrained, smooth, with a bar music feel.

This is an album that draws its influences not as much from British prog but rather from the primary sources of Ameican rock another modern band with such an To my ears and sensibility, 3RDegree's The Long Division is exactly the kind of prog album this decade needs. The band couples great musicianship with infectious hooks, adding clever, socially conscious lyrics and a healthy dose of lush vocal harmonies. Not only are the individual songs strong on th I really regret dragging my feet on getting this but I have been in a lull of not buying music.

I listened to it for the first time in the car just after it arrived was greatly impressed. My wife commented that it had been awhile since she saw me with that big a smile on my face while listenin Great example of prog rock's various best known characteristics put to use to create an album that can really be enjoyed by those who have no idea what prog might be as a genre.

Is the album chock full of virtuosic passages-no-but they are so welcome when they find their way into really well con Heavy and deep in parts, syrupy sweet at others, the album is like a good book that's hard to put down. It ho In a genre where lyrics often are thrown away or deal in fantasy, 3RDegree instead release a relevant album in a US election year that doesn't tell you who to vote for but rather marvel at the ridiculousness of it all.

Because of this, "side two" can possibly be overlooked but there I've been following this band since their release "Narrow-Caster", which I liked a lot. Since then, 3RDegree have been hard at work on their follow-up, which was released in September In a landslide of strong album releases in and how come the know-it-all Mayans didn't predict that? Which is what I did, and it was because what I had seen was so bad. These album covers were put together by printers who were supplied with very often a bad photograph, and they would put the lettering down with their eyes closed.

None of this had any importance to anyone, it was just some small market. The posters that were advertising dancers. They were put together by the same people who made boxing posters. This was a letter press, and those big letters were actually wooden letters, put together one at a time, and they would insert blocks with pictures and this awful lettering. And it was all hand set.

I revolutionized Latin album cover art because I started designing them by hand, and reproducing them in photo offset lithography. I was always bumping heads, Masucci wanted complete control most of the time, but sometimes, I was able to turn things around, and be completely accepted.

Number one, the name of the album was La Gran Fuga, you know, The Great Escape, they handed me a photograph, which was the guys in color, that was pretty washed out. It was the guys in prison outfits, escaping over the fence of a prison in Puerto Rico. So, what I did was that I used that photograph, I turned it into a black and white, and I turned it into a vilox, line screen, to make it look like a newspaper, and I in fact made a replica of the New York Daily News on the back.

The hippies were selling copies of the posters. I took Willie downstairs, I had an office on 52nd and Broadway, went to the corner where there was one of these arcades. Four photos for a quarter. So I took four of them facing front, and four profile shots, because I wanted that bad quality. The prison numbers under his mug shot are his previous LP catalogue numbers.

The fingerprints were taken from a post office Wanted poster. That was only the first five thousand. In his parents returned to Cuba, where he was raised in the Luyano district of Havana. At the age of 10, he was sent to live with his paternal grandmother in the picturesque seaport of Antilla, in Oriente province. It was there that he first heard the music that would someday fulfil his dreams. During the period from throughChico would spend his summer vacations in New York City, where he first came under the influence of rock and roll.

He returned to Cuba in September of and began his initial venture into the realm of popular music. Along with a group of young musicians from Antilla, he sought to breathe new life into the music which he had heard while living in New York. At this time in his life he was the stereotypical Cuban teenager who wanted more than anything else to be a rock and roll singer. He dreamed of someday being on American Bandstand. It was during this visit that he experienced a newly-awakened interest in Cuban music, via the 78 rpm recordings of his parents and by way of Spanish language radio.

By September he was back in Cuba, but not for very long. His parents made the final move to New York in late From that point on, his life would revolve around popular American culture, and it was in that most difficult of places, New York, that he would develop as an artist.

His first instrument was the conga drum, which he picked up while still in High School, emulating the sounds which he heard on records by Mongo Santamaria, Tito Puente and Joe Cuba. He was like a diamond in the rough, and listening to these masters helped him to polish that diamond.

At the tail end of the Sixties he began to perform with as many groups as he possibly could, in order to gain the experience he needed. During the early part of the Seventies Chico played with various small groups, mostly in small clubs and bars, totally unsatisfied, as deep down inside he longed to play with larger ensembles, such as those led by Machito, Puente and Rodriguez.

These three were the last of the big bands whose popularity was waning at the time. Midway through the decade, as a new era in Cuban music was being ushered in he once again contemplated singing, and it was through a quirk of fate that he finally made the switch.

It happened in the following manner. While opening up for vocalist Tito Rodriguez's band at a ballroom in Newark, Chico's vocalist failed to show up and he wound up singing lead and playing the conga drum, a task which he found overwhelming. Noticing his potential, Tito approached him at the end of the set and suggested that Always There - Various - Sax And The City - Mellow Grooves And Late Night Moods (CD) pursue a career as a vocalist.

Although he felt honoured that such a renowned artist would take notice of him, he continued to play the congas, which he loved. Although they remained in the back of his mind, Tito's advice went unheeded for a couple of more years, until around As fate would have it, there occurred a second boom with the "charanga" style bands, and another quirk of fate led Chico to a club called La Mancha, which was located on 14th Street, near Union Square.

Marcadores: Record Of The Week. Comment: We are the Fans! And here we have it! One of the best organ jazz blues recordings, at least in my opinion. But instead, let me just point to one small detail: Listen carefully at around 27 seconds into the song.

At this moment Holmes is switching the organ motor off and then back on again in a split second, and the effect is that the sound of the organ is pitch-bending as the restarted motor frantically adjusts trying to deliver a stable speed again correlated to the frequency of 60 Hz current from the wall socket. And Holmes is using this Hammond-trick in the ongoing swinging context of the song! He is actually using this effect as an integrated part of the start of his solo phrasing.

Neat and pretty, to say the least… By Jazz Organ Fan comment on the old post. More On Mr. Misty repeats the hit and features some other catchy arrangements of standards.

Saxophonist Rusty Bryant is a strong asset on the latter set. Like many other organists in the mids, Holmes experimented a bit with electric keyboards.

But he soon realized that his musical personality was really to be found on the organ so he switched back, staying active as one of the top organists on the soul-jazz scene until his death in From Concord Music Group.

In memory of Roberto 'Pappa' Rodriguez Rest In Peace my Bro! Al Kent included the 12 inch version on his Disco Love Volume 2 for BBE, and while we did the licensing deal we discovered the original tapes were still safe and sound. So Al excitedly set to work creating a more disco friendly version of the song, taking influence from his hero Walter Gibbons, which quickly became a highlight of his DJ sets.

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9 thoughts on “Always There - Various - Sax And The City - Mellow Grooves And Late Night Moods (CD)

  1. Sax and the City: Mellow Grooves and Late Night Moods collects 33 laid-back tracks taken from the Warner Bros. label with decent, if not outstanding, performances. This mixed bag includes R&B legend Curtis Mayfield, crossover jazz saxophonist Grover Washington, Jr., and former James Brown saxophonist Maceo Parker.5/

  2. Curtis Mayfield. –Curtis Mayfield Move On Up. –King Curtis And I Love Her. Swing When You're Winning. –Us3, Rahsaan, Gerard Presencer Cantaloop (Flip Fantasia). –Spyro Gyra Morning blueskyservices.biz Rating: % positive.

  3. MB Music/Various Artists/Sax and the City- Mellow Grooves and Late Night Moods Disc 1/01 Always blueskyservices.biz3 ; MB Music/Various Artists/Sax and the City- Mellow Grooves and Late Night Moods Disc 1/02 Loran's blueskyservices.biz3 ; MB Music/Various Artists/Sax and the City- Mellow Grooves and Late Night Moods Disc 1/03 Uncle blueskyservices.biz3.

  4. Sep 13,  · Discover releases, reviews, songs, credits, and more about Mellow Mellow (The Feeling Keeps On Coming) (Original s Smooth Grooves & Chilled Breaks) at Discogs. Shop Vinyl and CDs and complete your collection/5.

  5. Aug 07,  · Aug 07,  · Sax and the City: Mellow Moods and Late Night Grooves. Disc: 1 1. Ronnie Laws - Always There 2. Grover Washington Jr- Loran's Dance 3. Deodato - Uncle Funk 4. Maceo Parker - Pass The Peas 5. Spyro Gyra - Morning Dance blueskyservices.biz-O-Loco blueskyservices.biz Y Romance (Rhythm & Romance) blueskyservices.biz A Mi blueskyservices.biz blueskyservices.biz Bailar.

  6. always too late always too late (lovers instrumental) muenu menu4 test pressing who put the bomp (in the bomp-a-bomp-a-bomp) rca db 2(c)1*1* feel so real only crying don't play with my emotions pik 2 lonely together arist cameron john and the moonshine band the ballad of cathouse thursday billy's toon pen boneyard fortunate son.

  7. a. They were developed during the late nineteenth century in Buenos Aires, Argentina b. They rejected privacy as a cultural value and advocated for communal living c. They were influenced by German drinking songs and featured Aboriginal Australian instruments like the didgeridoo d. They were sung from the third-person perspective e.

  8. (Ambient, Chillout, Downtempo, New Age, Psy Chill) Wind of Buri - Collection (tracks), , MP3, kbps» Музыка (lossy):: blueskyservices.biz

  9. Jazz Super Hits of the '70s & '80s is a seven-track, budget-line collection of fusion and smooth jazz cuts from those two decades. While there are a few good cuts here -- Donald Byrd's "Black Byrd," Stanley Jordan's "Lady in My Life" -- much of this collection is simply too lightweight for most jazz purists, and it doesn't convey the right smooth mood for fusion fans.

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