Give Me That Old Time Religion - Mahalia Jackson - Mahalia Jackson Vol. 1 (Vinyl, LP, Album)

Julius LaRosa, popular singer of the time, is unceremoniously fired on the air by Arthur Godfrey. Frank Sinatra recorded Young at Heart. It became a top hit Give Me That Old Time Religion - Mahalia Jackson - Mahalia Jackson Vol. 1 (Vinyl the U. The song, from the motion picture, Calamity Jane, stayed at the top of the music charts for three weeks. Toscanini ended a year association with the orchestra. Gee, by The Crows, became the first rhythm and blues single to gain attention on pop music charts.

Gee, written by William Davis, the baritone of The Crows, made it to 17 on the pop music chart and stayed for one week. This was also one of the first songs by a black group to be played on white radio stations. The Crows came together in the late s in New York City, singing on street corners. The group split up in the late s. Billboard magazine, the music industry trade publication, headlined a change to come about in the music biz.

Eddie Condon and his band played Muskrat Ramble as the opening number of the world's first jazz fest. A tune used in a Studio One production became the 1 song on the pop music charts this day. Before being aired on television, the song had only been heard on a limited basis. In fact, the title was even different. It used to be known as Let Me Go, Devil. Billboard announced that seven-inch, rpm, singles were outselling rpm singles for the first time in the U.

The Dave Brubeck Quartet presented a magnificent concert for jazz fans. Joining with Brubeck, in what would become one of the most popular concert draws on college campuses, were names that would become legends in their own right, including Paul Desmond on alto sax, Joe Morello on drums and Eugene Wright on bass.

The first pop song by Julie London appeared on the charts. Julie was Mrs. Jack Webb Dragnet and Mrs. Bobby Troup songwriter, trumpeter. The Vienna State Opera House in Austria formally opened, celebrating the end of 17 years of foreign occupation. The two tunes completed the Calypso album which led to Belafonte's nickname, "Calypso King". Buddy Holly had his first of three recording sessions for Decca Records and producer, Owen Bradley, in Nashville.

Nothing much came out of those sessions. He was Holly was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in The building was the first circular office tower designed in America. It is 13 stories tall and 92 feet in diameter. Interesting note: Vincent had written the tune only three days before he auditioned in a record company talent search that won him first place.

The record was rush-released just two days later and became a rock and roll classic. Gogi Grant born Audrey Brown reached the top spot on the Billboard singles chart for the first and only time in her career.

Her hit, The Wayward Wind, stayed at the top of the top-tune tabulation for eight weeks and on the music charts for 22 weeks. It was her second record release. Vincent died in Johnny Cash hit the record running with I Walk the Line. Holding the 1 spot on the music charts: Guy Mitchell singing Singing the Blues.

The song remained at the top of the Hit Parade for 10 weeks. The four-part symphony jazz suite was conducted by Dimitri Mitropoulos. Both songs were released on Brunswick Records in May of that year. On September 14th, the tune became the most popular record in the U. It was the first hit for Holly and his group after two previous releases went nowhere on Decca Records in Pat Boone was at the top of the pop charts for the first of six weeks with April Love.

See what wearing white buck shoes and drinking lots of milk can do for you? At the Hop, by Danny and The Juniors, hit 1 on the music charts.

It stayed at the top spot for seven weeks. He called The Juniors to come into the studio immediately. It took off like a rocket to number one. It remained at 1 for two weeks. Talk about sudden change in American popular music! The song was the first stereo record to make the pop music charts. Thank you. The record began its stay at number one three weeks on June 9, Mathis studied opera from age 13 and earned a track and field scholarship at San Francisco State College.

He was invited to Olympic try-outs and chose a singing career instead. He was originally a jazz-style singer when Mitch Miller of Columbia switched Mathis to singing pop ballads. Johnny would chart over 60 albums in 30 years. Bobby Darin's single, Splish Splash, was released as the first eight-track master recording pressed to a plastic 45 RPM disc.

Splish Splash was recorded by Bobby Darin. It was his first hit and it took Darin only ten minutes to write the song. It went to the soundtrack LP, OK!. The honor signified that the album had reached one million dollars in sales. Yakety Yak, by The Coasters, became the number one song in the U. It was the first stereo record to reach the top of the chart. Prado was known as the Mambo King for his popular, Latin-flavored instrumentals.

The single, Patricia, was certified as having sold over one million copies. This day was musically memorable as Warren Covington conducted the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra for what would be the last big band tune to climb the pop charts. Tea for Two Cha Cha, made it into the Top 10, peaking at 7.

And that was the end of the Big Band Era. Orchestral strings were used for the first time in a rock and roll tune. Billboard magazine introduced a new chart. It ranked the top singles in order, from number 1 to Previously, only 30 records had been on the weekly hit list. Harold Jenkins, who changed his name to Conway Twitty, got his first 1 hit on this day. The Chipmunks were at the 1 position on the music charts.

Alvin, Simon, and Theodore sang with David Seville. The Coasters tune, Charlie Brown, was released. I smell smoke in the auditorium And what song was at number one, preventing Charlie Brown from reaching the top, you ask? Venus, by Frankie Avalon. To be so means to be at the top of the list and still climbing higher. The LP stayed for several more years at or near the top of the album charts.

It became the all-time album leader at weeks. The song was number one for a total of six weeks. He had big hits, however, with movie music: Sink the Bismarck and North to Alaska from the film by the same title, starring John Wayne -- both in Tragically, Johnny Horton was killed in a car crash on November 5, The tune went to number 83 on the Top chart of "Billboard" magazine. The song was re-released in and made it to number three on the charts. Sleepwalk was number one for two weeks.

Their next song, Tear Drop, only made it to number 23 on the pop charts. Such is life in the pop music biz. Teenage stabbings in the city had people pretty uptight; therefore, the ban. The US Federal Trade Commission charges seven record companies and eight distribution firms with paying disc-jockeys to play certain songs.

Payola Incident. Congressional investigators began exploring the influence of payola in the radio and record industries. Dick Clark told a House of Representatives investigating committee looking into the payola scandal that he, the host of American Bandstand, never took payola for records featured on his daily TV show. Clark would, however, relinquish rights to music publishing that he owned. The song stayed at number one for 5 weeks -- a big hit for the duo. The song inspired the dance craze of the s.

The U. Federal Communications Commission banned payola. He lost his job at WABC for allegedly accepting gifts and money for playing certain records.

There was substantial evidence to prove that the practice was quite widespread. Frank Sinatra recorded his first session with his very own record company. The Beach Boys also recorded under the Reprise Records banner. The revitalized group still tours and Capitol continues to reissue various greatest hits packages.

She sang in the role of Leonora in Il Trovatore. Price was only the seventh black singer to make a debut at the Met. Marian Anderson was the first The song was at the top for two weeks. She became a huge star in her own right with several 1 singles and albums in the s. Her name: Carole King. Poor Little Fool made it to the top in August of Louis, MO.

Roy Orbison was wrapping up a week at number one on the Billboard record chart with Running Scared, his first number one hit. Orbison recorded 23 hits for the pop charts, but only one other song made it to number one: Oh Pretty Woman in Orbison was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in ; but suffered a fatal heart attack just one year later. Pat Boone spent this day at number one for one last time with Moody River.

John Hammond. The top, pop song on the charts belonged to Dion DiMucci. Runaround Sue was in its second week at the tiptop of the top-tune tabulation it was in the top 40 for three months. The Twist became the first record to reach 1 a second time around -- on January 13, Their new musical style swept the U. Gene Chandler hit 1 with Duke of Earl on this day. The song stayed at the tippy-top for three weeks. His only other million seller came with Groovy Situation in He owned his own record label, Mr.

Chand, from tothough "Groovy Situation" was recorded in for Mercury. Frank Sinatra recorded his final session for Capitol Records in Hollywood. Sinatra had been recording for his own record label, Reprise, for two years. Goodman and his band played six concerts in the USSR. Two albums of melancholy music by Jackie Gleason received gold record honors. Both were issued by Capitol Records in Hollywood. Orchestra leader David Rose reached the top spot on the popular music charts.

The Stripper stayed at the pinnacle of musicdom for one week. The song stayed at the top for four weeks and was the first of four 1 hits for Vinton. The others were: Blue Velvet, There! The cast included newcomer Bob Dylan making his first appearance at Carnegie Hall.

The list has been known as Hot Country Singles ever since. Bob Dylan gave his first major concert outside of Greenwich Village. The Carnegie Hall solo appearance was not well attended. The song soon became one of the classics of the s protest movement.

It later rose to the 1 position March 30th for a four-week stay. The song later became the center of one of the most publicized lawsuits in music history. Through the years, controversy continually surrounded the song. It was banned by several radio stations whose management figured that the song was about the elicit joys of smoking marijuana. The group denied this startling assumption. The Rolling Stones produced their very first recordings this day.

The Stones would make it to the American pop music charts in August, Kyu Sakamoto from Kawasaki, Japan, reached the number one spot on the pop music charts with Sukiyaki. The popular song captivated American music buyers and was at the top of the Billboard pop chart for three weeks.

The entertainer met an untimely fate in Kyu cue Sakamoto was one of people who perished in the crash of a Japan Air Lines flight near Tokyo. He was 43 years old. Fingertips - Pt 2, by Little Stevie Wonder, was released. Eight of those hits made it to number one. Brenda Lee inked a new recording contract with Decca Records. She was guaranteed one million dollars over the next 20 years. Conniff recorded dozens of albums of easy listening music for the label.

It became one of their biggest hits. Surfer Girl made it to number seven on the hit music charts. It went to number two on the pop charts. It had hit U. Buck Owens started a week run at top of the U. It eventually became the biggest of all the Buck Owens hits. Peter, Paul and Mary were sitting pretty at 1 and 2 on the U. After giving benefit performances for years, singer Kate Smith presented her first full concert performance to a paying crowd -- at Carnegie Hall in NY City.

Hello Dolly! The milestone put Louis Armstrong on the Billboard music chart in the top spot for the first time in his year music career. Dean Martin emceed the show. The original cast album of Hello Dolly! It was quite a feat for a Broadway musical. The 4 Seasons reached the top spot on the record charts with Rag Doll, the group's fourth hit to climb to the 1 position.

The song stayed on top for two weeks. It hit number one for 3 weeks on September 26th and became the biggest of his career. It was not one of his more successful recordings. Bob Dylan appeared on the pop music charts for the first time. Subterranean Homesick Blues entered the Top 40 at number The song stayed on the charts for eight weeks.

Dylan would chart a total of 12 singles on the pop charts between and He made the film Renaldo and Clara in Dylan co-starred in the film Hearts of Fire in The audience applauded the piano virtuoso with a standing ovation that lasted for 30 minutes. Roger Miller received a gold record for the hit, King of the Road.

The song was Miller's biggest hit record. He wrote songs and played drums for Faron Young inthen won what was an unprecedented six Grammy Awards inhad his own TV show in ; wrote Little Green Apples, a huge hit for O. Smith and had five tunes in the top ten in The Tops, who had no personnel changes in their more than 35 years together were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Tambourine Man, by The Byrds, reached the number one spot on the pop music charts.

The song was considered by many to be the first folk-rock hit. Bob Dylan appeared on stage at the Newport Jazz Festival with an electric guitar. He was, in fact, booed right off the stage. Adding to his many credits, accolades and honors, Henry Mancini received a gold record for the soundtrack LP from the movie, The Pink Panther. Staff Sgt. Sadler, who recorded one other single The "A" Team for the label, had served in Vietnam until injuring a leg in a Viet Cong booby trap.

Tragically, Sadler was shot in the head during a robbery attempt at his Guatemala home. He suffered irreparable brain damage and died of heart failure in November, in Tennessee. He was 49 years old. A hundred bucks a week!

I'm flying here. And I have my own cubby hole where I can write my stuff to my heart's content, and who knows who I might meet There were many small labels in the Brill Building that offered you the op portunity to just run up there and say, "Hey, listell to this song.

If you played a song and they liked it, they'd say, "Let's think. Do we know anyone who can do this? Do you? If it didn't, so what, no big deal. Not any more. Now it's album, album H was a happy time. Monetarily stupid, maybe, but on a creative level you just weren't bothered with any problems. All you did was come in and hone in on your craft. We were very grateful to be signed to a music publisher and get our weekly little paycheck. We always got our royalties.

But we never knew to ask Give Me That Old Time Religion - Mahalia Jackson - Mahalia Jackson Vol. 1 (Vinyl retaining songs. Who knew those songs would live on? A whole industry was by this time building up around TV shows like American Bandstand, which not only introduced a never-ending stream of wooden boy idols to the nation's teenagers but also created hundreds of dance crazes.

When the Goffins came up with "The Locomotion," a new dance tune, they asked their babysitter-who had inspired the song by her style of dancing-to cut the demo for them. Kirschner liked the demo so much that he released it as it was on his new Dimension label, and in no time, "The Locomotion" had rcached the number-one spot.

Little Eva, as she was now called, became an overnight sensation; such a huge success by an unknown artist on a nt'W label was extraordina ry. Having been feted in Europe and America, in less than two years Eva's career was Over. TIle tale of Little Eva showed the industry both at its best and at its worst. Often, a sin gle individual would perform some or all of these functions; many songwriters set up their own labels, produced, and even sang on the records.

The speed at which a11 this happened meant that a trend could be quickly spotted and exploited. TIle sheer volume of records that such a system produced made it likely that a certain percent age at least would chilrt.

The ildvantages of tilt' system were that it allowed for an extraordinary degree of creative fleXibility and a fast response to an ever-changing market so that the small labels could make it. MlHl0lithic recording corporations like RCA Victor, although they had all the financial muscle, simply could not keep up with what was going on. But tlwre were clear disadvantages for the artists, as the Shirellps had already seen.

Singers were at the very bol! Dlll of the hierarchy. Producers could take their pick from the Illilny talented young blilck singers who were desperate to succeed and sold their skills chmp. Little EVil at least had her moment of fame. The other girls that King and Coffin werE' writing for did not fare so well. The Cookies were a trio who provided backing VOGlls for many of the releases on Aldon's label, and who also recorded songs writ t.

The doo-wah, doo-wah choruses and the young, sweet voices of the Cookies dis guised the fact that wbat was being described here were not the joys of coy feminin ity but its awful restrictions. As with Little Eva, Aldon was keener to make the most of the Cookies while the going was good than to help the group sustain its popularity over the long term.

The group never got the attention they deserved, and soon disappeared from view. Over at Leiber and Stoller's, Ellie Greenwich was beginning to rival Carole King as the songwriting queen of teen pop. She had arrived in the business inlater than Carole King, and began by teaming up with several different writers until she settled into a partnership with Jeff Barry.

In the early days, she remembers: Most of the women in the industry were background singers or lyricists. There were very few women that played piano, wrote songs and could produce a session, go into a studio and work those controls. The studio would be booked from two to five and those singers would go in there and read off the songs; maybe they'd do seventeen songs in three hours. I'd write a song and go in and put the background parts on myself; 1 learnt about overdubbing and laying down tracks, so a different sound started coming out.

Ellie had not set out to be a producer, but she soon found herself becoming one: Myself and Carole King We also sang. So we'd go in and make demos on our songs and they sometimes sounded great.

The publishers would take the demo off to a record label who would say, "OK, let's put this out. Not only was Ellie the songwriter finding herself in the position of producer, she was also effectively becoming an artist too.

Since record companies were beginning to re lease the demos they got from publishers as records, Ellie soon became the voice be hind a host of fictitious teen groups: Acase like that was the Raindrops, which was just myself and Jeff doing all the voices.

We did this demo for a group called the Sensations; it was a song called "What A Guy," which we thought would be great for them. We made the demo, and the publishers said, "This could be a record. There is no group. So we released it as a record by "The Raindrops. There really wasn't a Raindrops As the tales of little Eva and her sister Idalia and of groups like the Shirelles and the Cookies demonstrate, the creative flexibility of the Brill Building could work to the disadvantage of the singers.

The fate of recordings, such as "Let's Turkey Trot" and "Hula Hoppin,''' showed that singers were often viewed as interchangeable parts. In what is probably not a paradox, the most widely celebrated figure connected with the singer-songwriter genre was male: producer songwriter Phil Spector b. Although this sound has often been inaccurately compared occasionally by Spector himself to the textural approach of European Romantics, such as Richard Wagner, what Spector shared with Wagner was a grandiosity of vision and a tendency toward self-aggrandizement.

His sound was Widely influential, and Spector repre sented a shift of power in the music business to people who were of the same generation as the audience,S a trend that intensified with the alignment of songwriter and performer that came to dominate American popular music in the wake of the girl groups.

Darlene Love b. A particularly' disturbing case on:urn. I aIn reft'rring to his arn! These t'vcnts set:"lllPd to cap ypars of n:. Kllluly-f "l"r. While Spector allowed her to make record ings under her own name, she also appeared on recordings attributed to any number of other groups whose names existed as trademarks con trolled by Spector. Both the structure of the music business and the anonymity-by-design of the performers make it little wonder, then, that Spector's notoriety has far outstripped that of the people who sang and played and arranged and engineered on the recordings that are associated with him.

Here, Darlene Loye takes up the story. When I visited her, she was ltv ing in style at the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford on Ayon, during the firs run of the musical Carrie, which later bombed on Broadway. We sat in her dressingl room oyerlooking the riYer, and she told me: I first met Phil in Los Angeles through his partner Lester Sill, because I was d"ing ,1 lot of sessions for Lester singing back-up.

I was called in to do "He's A Rebel. Something had happened with their friendship at the time. Phil owned the name of the Crystals. During that time, producer, owned groups' names so they could record anyone they wanted under any name.

Phi] gave me mv name, in fact; at thaI time I was called Darlene Wright. So I got about 1, dollars. There was nothing they could do; indeed, they were helpless without Spector. To this day, Dee Dee Kennibrew of the Crystals, who did finally manage to retrieve the group's name from Spector and work under it, refuses to acknowledge Darlene Love's part in the Crystals' career, Darlene's slory is, howeYer, that Spector, like so many other producers in the business, paid no regard to anyone's names, including her own: When we Wf'nt to record with Phil WE' never knew which record was going to he by who.

After "He's A Rebel," the next thing he wanted wa, another record. But I didn't get it. But no. When I heard it on the radio, they announced that it was by the Crystals. I asked for a contract again with "Da Ron Ron. We didn't sign contracts in the end until after "Da Ron Ron.

To all intents and purposes, groups like the Crystals appeared only to exist now in Spector's imag ination as concepts for the next single. The public did not seem to mind or notice what was going on. You know, [ started off inand in I started a solo career. That's kind of unusual. It helps that no one has ever rf'ally seen me.

I'm a fresh idea. Further Reading Bradby, Barbara. Brown, Mick. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, Clemente, ]01u1. Emerson, Ken. New York: Viking, Spector, Ronnie with Vince Waldron. New York Harper Perennial, Warwick, Jacqueline.

Wolfe, Tom. New York: pocket Books, But it was a huge hit, and we became Bob B. Soxx and the Blue Jeans. Nobody knew who [ was at all. They were trying to figure out if there was one person doing all the singing on Phil's records. They thought it was Barbara Alston of the Crystals. Jarlene's wonderful voice put her solo recordings, like "Today I Met the Boy I'm :;onna Marry" and "Christmas Baby LP Come Home ," in a class of their own lmongst Spector's by now unbelievably successful teen pop discs.

Yet she still did lOt emerge as a solo artist in her own right: I didn't really push my career as Darlene Love. I was a very successful back-up singer, and that was important, because J had something to fall back on; it was a job, like being a secretary.

T didn't just depend on Phil, 1 had my own career. Also, I had children and I didn't want to tour. I've had a very full career; in the sixties, I sang with all kinds of people, including Elvis on his comeback special in From to J sang back-up for Dionne Warwick. In the eighties, my career has really taken off; I got a part in "Lethal Weapon," then there was Cnrrie, nnd my new album is coming out too.

Concurrent with the dance crazes and girl-group phenomenon, the American imagination increasingly shifted westward to the land of fruit and nuts, as California rapidly became the most populous and econom' ically important of the 50 states.

Out of the sun-drenched expanses of the rapidly growing suburbs in Southern California came surf music, with its litany of beaches, blondes, and Bonneville sport coupes. Initially, an instrumental genre led by guitarist Dick Dale a real, live surfer and by guitar-dominated instrumental bands, such as the Ventures, surf came to be associated most strongly with the Beach Boys, a band that developed a distinctive, contrapuntal, falsetto-led vocal style.

The group was a family affair, consisting of three Wilson brothers Brian. The eldest brother, Brian b. The early hits of all hewed close to these themes in one way or another, although the emotional range and the harmonic palette ex.

The following excerpts from Brian Wilson's autobiography describe a period after Wilson suffered a nervous breakdown in and subse quently stopped touring, a move that enabled him to devote more energy to songwriting and production.

While his songs had continuously in creased in musical complex. The result? Pet Sounds, one of the first "concept" albums, and one of the first to feature overt studio experimentation including elaborate overdubbing and mix ing, unusual instruments, and songs with multiple tempi. Although Pet Sounds did not equal the success of earlier Beach Boys' albums manag ing nevertheless to reach the Top 10it, and the commercially successful single that followed, "Good Vibrations," subsequently established critical high-water marks for the band.

Here, Wilson describes the creation of these recordings. Under a cloud of pol smoke, it was a ceremonial event. A bunch of US sat around the dining room table, gazing out the window at the expanse If city lights shimmer ing below, smoking joints as the album played. No one ventured an opinion until I expressed mine. That was easy. I was knocked out. That's what 1 to do. He thought it was a good pop song, light and Illlmmable. Our next song was done with the record company breathing so hard down rny neck for a new single that I began every day by unplugging the phone.

One of the prettiest, most personal songs I've ever written, "Caroline, No" concerned growing up and the loss of innocence. I'd reminisced to Tony about my high school crush on Carol Mountain and sighed, "Jf I saw her today, I'd probably think, God, she's lost something, because growing up does that to people.

We were young, Marilyn nearing twenty and l11e closing in on twenty-four, yet I thought we'd lost the innocence of oUI youth in lhe heavy seriousness of our lives. The lightness that had once been ours was fading. Subconsciously, I might've sensed that the power allowing me to do spe cial things naturally might not last too much longer.

All that made me sad. The first time I plav ed the melody of "Caroline, No" he told me the song had sin gle potential. He took a tape home, embellished on my concept, and completed the words. The Beach Boys were on the road when il came time to record "Caroline, No," though between the pressure Capitol was putting on me to get a single ready, the song's intensely personal nature, and the creative space I was in at the time, 1 didn't think about waiting for them to get back to town.

Instead, 1 did it myself. It took seventeen takes before the song sounded the way I wanted, perfect. At the end of the seventeenth take, tears were streaming down my eyes, and I knew I'd nailed it. But it still wasn't finished. I played "Caroline, No" for my dad. Though our contact W,IS minimal, for some reason I continued to solicit his opinion. He praised the song but suggested that I change the key from C to D.

The engineer put a wrap around the recording head, a technique which sped up the playback, and the two of us listened again. My dad was right, and I took his advice. As work progressed, I began to consider making the album a solo project. The' songs were a telling self-portrait of my twubled psyche: "I Just WaSl1't Made for These Times" was a lament about being too advanced and having to leave people behind; "I.

The track originally included lyrics but worked better as an instrumental and became one of the most sat isfying of my songs. I pulled myself oul of bed, went to the! It was mid-February. Thev bite others because they give off bad vibrations. I haw a feeling this is a v. Good Vibrations" on the preliminary list of songs [ told Capitol would be on the album. Two weeks later, though, I changed mv mind and took the song off.

The time wasn't right. With plenty of other good songs needing work, Tony and I turned our attention to "God Only Knows," the song about which j felt the strongest and proudest. The melody was inspired by a John Sebastian record I'd been listening to, and the idea summarized ev.

But it began with an argument. I hated the opening line, "I may not always love you. It was too negath'e. But consider the next [ine. Then we had another argument over the word God. No one had ever recorded it before in a popular song. Tony understood, but he was adamant about not compromising the artistic integrity I eventually agrepd too. First, beCause Cod was a spiritual '''''ord, and second, because we'd be breaking ground. Both were good reasons to leave it unchanged.

I gathered twenty-thrt'e lllusicians in one studio, an extraordinary number for a pop record. Everyone played simultaneously, the different sounds bleeding into one other, producing a rich.

It wasn't likp making records is today, with seventy-eight tracks and eVPlY instrument recorded individually and mixed later. Then, everyone had to play live. It either worked or it didn't. The ability to make the tvpe of snap decisions a production of that size required was what separated 5pect m from the pack.

I excelled there too, but 1 still did twenty takes before the tracks sounded the way I heard them in. And they didn't. First, they were put offbv the fact that 1 didn't. Especially Mike, whose biggest concern was, Will it sell? He hated every thing. He criticized it as "ego music. The ears of a dog? It was quite clear that none of them, except Dennis, who was always my biggest supporter in the stu dio, and Bruce Johnston, who loved everything, understood the album's significance to me.

I'd poured my soul into tlwse songs. The pain, the JOY, the conflicts, the sad ness, the love. They were everything to me, my flesh and blood. They only knew the songs weren't about sun, fun, and bikini-clad buns. But that's always been the core difference between me and the Beach Boys.

To the guys, the group WaS a great gig, a terrific job. The pay was good, the fringe bene fits even better. They just wanted me to crank 'ut the spngs like a machine. Stick in a nickel, pull the handle, tak" five doll 'lIS. Money never entered my mind when 1 wrote a song. Writing songs was what 1 did. I wasn't just entertaining people, 1was speaking directly to them, di rectly from my heart.

Petersburg Times. November 22, Retrieved April 26, The Lewiston Journal. August 13, AP News Archive. July 27, Los Angeles Times. July 10, Jazz FM.

Retrieved April 19, Daily News. Kingsport, Tennessee. April 13, University of California Press. Oxford Music Online. October 10, National Archives. August 15, Retrieved June 22, One Art: Letters. Pimlico, Retrieved June 28, Retrieved March 19, The Recording Academy. November 23, Grammy Awards. Retrieved October 6, Archived from the original on August 17, Retrieved July 4, Harvard University.

Retrieved May 30, Radio Swizz Jazz. Retrieved March 25, Ed Dwight Studios, Inc. Archived from the original on August 9, Retrieved July 25, WHSV News 3. Retrieved December 2, Retrieved September 9, The Telegraph Online.

BBC Radio 2 — Bbc. April 25, Retrieved April 25, Gourse, Leslie The Ella Fitzgerald Companion. London: Omnibus Press. Hemming, Roy; Hajdu, David Discovering great singers of classic pop : a new listener's guide to the sounds and lives of the top performers and their recordings, movies, and videos. New York: Newmarket Press. Johnson, J. Wilfred Ella Fitzgerald: An Annotated Discography. Nicholson, Stuart Ella Fitzgerald: — London: Indigo.

Ella Fitzgerald : the complete biography. New York: Routledge. OCLC United States portal Biography portal Music portal. What does such an influential musician listen to when he wants to relax or feel inspired? Melody Maker put him to the question in Some of his answers may surprise you, others may not. We used to follow The Birthday Party about, they were the ones that were responsible for getting us a deal with 4AD. Not a bit like the Cocteaus? Naah, it was that big guitar noise you got on 'The Friend Catcher' that was one of the things that inspired us.

I've got a lot of time for Nick Cave. Every couple of years I retune myself into what's he doing, even the sea shanty stuff as some people call it. I'm a sucker for wasted types, men who can wear tight trousers and pointy shoes without looking like a pillock. Me, I turned out the wrong shape to be wasted! I love the arrangement of it, the movement, the way it built up. This was just as we were starting out and maybe it influenced the way we built our sound up.

It was before she became a born-again Christian and started talking about the evils of homosexuality when most of her fans were on the Hi-NRG circuit. The Pop Group: "She is beyond Good and Evil" "I haven't actually heard this in years but it sums up a particular moment in time for me. Again, it was the noise he [Mark Stewart] made.

He's still really good now. The Pop Group were the first ones ever to mix post-punk with fun and dance rhythms. But it was always harder than the ones doing it now. I know we weren't suppposed to have stars but we were still awestruck even though we could approach them anytime backstage, in a way you couldn't with Bowie and T Rex. The last time I saw Nick properly was a couple of years ago back in Sao Paolo.

We got ourselves in a horrible state. So we made a demo, made two copies, sent Give Me That Old Time Religion - Mahalia Jackson - Mahalia Jackson Vol. 1 (Vinyl to Peel and one to 4AD. We chose 4AD, it never occurred to us that 4AD might not choose us. We thought it was a dead easy to get a record deal because we were so great - we were fucking crazy.

Anyway, 'Lonely Planet', what a fucking record. He was only about 20 when he made it. I didn't have much time for the things he was doing a few years back but with his last album I'm right back into him.

Them and Roxy Music were the first people I ever heard using keybroads like machines and not just Hammond organs. The first album was great. You try sitting alone, fucked up on drugs, late at night, listening to that 10 minute track, 'Frankie Teardrop' - you'll fucking die!

It's so scary. After that, they went on to make a lot of crap. It's not particularly the militant thing about them, it's more from hearing it in the clubs, the noise it makes. I don't know if it's exactly changed my life. I went through a phase a couple of years ago of not listening to anybody else's music at all, but just this past year I've had an incredibly refreshed attitude, I've rekindled my love. Also, I used to have a problem about listening to other people's stuff.

The way I saw it, if theirs was good it meant mine must be crap. I've had a few problems in my head with that, I can tell you.

It's not being competitive, it's insecurity and it meant not being able to own up to liking other people's stuff. It's only now I can do something like Rebellious Jukebox. The other Voice! Patsy Cline died odd years ago, so it was a bit tricky getting her to join the Cocteaus so I had to get Liz.

Just go pick up her greatest hits. King of the poncey ballads, Roddy! I love him. I've been an obsessive collector of Phil Spector's stuff, I've got loads and loads on vinyl, a lot of rarities. Nice tunes, big sounds - yeah, it was an obvious influence.

It was just him, his guitar and voice, so beautiful, so moving - what a fucking guy. And I was waiting out back to meet him and I Give Me That Old Time Religion - Mahalia Jackson - Mahalia Jackson Vol. 1 (Vinyl. Y'know what he said to me? There was a time when liking a record meant I would have had to go out and find out everything about the band, these days, as long as it's a good fucking record, I really don't care - which is the way it should be, I suppose.

But this is another of the records that's got me listening to music again. John Lennon's somebody I never even listened to until a few years ago. Same with The Doors, Dylan - I shut all these people out because punk rock told me to. And the wealth of stuff I was denying myself! Punk had always seemed such a positive energy to me that i never saw the negative side of it People think that?

Oh, no! We're still making records nbow the way we did then, that's the bottom line - in the same uncontrived, honest way, doing what the fuck we feel like. London: A. Topping the list is the Byrds' "Chestnut Mare. It's one of the first really great country rock songs, it's very poppy and has some really great guitar playing by Claret ce White.

I was in high school when I first heard it, but I didn't fully get into it until I was something. It has a realty nice string sound. So I chose both, I love the way songs can sound very intimate and not laboured at all.

They're both love songs: one to a lover and one to a mother. Their individual personalities come through. It's a really old beautiful story about this fictional woman who is killed by a rich person who has wealthy parents. What I like about the song is that it is such a direct, honest and pure social commentary and a story at the same time.

I saw Dylan not so long ago in LA. I honestly didn't know what to expect, but he was great. He was the first person I made a connection with. I thought if he could write these odd songs with an odd voice, then maybe I could do it too.

Initially, I was drawn to the madcap character of Syd. I saw them once and they blew people away. The guitarist broke a string so he ran out to the van for an inordinate amount of time. He then tuned his guitar at a deafening volume for ages, it was mad. It's a country rock epic. Gram Parsons is someone who I've liked for quite a while and, in a sense, I emulate him in certain ways. Our music reflects our personalities.

I think! I'm sure they learnt a lot from Gram Parsons. The singer, Ryan Adams, is really talented. It just amazes me how he weaves this little story. It sounds like it could have been written 50 years ago. It's such a great pop song. I love all the different voices Sly Stone used, and the way he incorporated different band members. The interpretation of the lyrics changes as each band member sings.

It's got a lotta soul and it's a great summer party song. The album is a concept about Vietnam, and it works really well. This song is untouched by pop conventions of the time. I like the story where this guy comes home from the war and he asks all these simple questions in the vernacular.

It sounds like this electric music drenched with folky acoustic guitars. It's the Stones take on a traditional American sound and they make it sound very special.

The Stones made amazing classic singles with a great take on gospel. I don't know what it means, but it just sounds right. London: May 23, A. The veteran frontman is reassembling Band of Joy, his project with the late John Bonham prior to the rockers' involvement with Zeppelin. The band plans to release a new album in summer or fall, and is booked for 12 U. Buddy Miller will serve as guitarist and as a co-producer. In a statement regarding Band of Joy, Plant said, quote, "It's been a blast working on these new songs -- I'm enjoying such creativity and vitality.

It's been a remarkable change of direction for all of us and as a group we all seem to have developed a new groove. She became an overnight publishing sensation at the relatively late age of forty-three and has written thirty-four books which have sold 15 million copies worldwide. Now, her publishers print 'Best Seller' on the cover of each new work, they're so confident of its success. But it was by no means a straightforward route to fame and fortune. She was born in Blackburn during World War Two and grew up in dire poverty.

As a child, she used to charge her school friends a penny for her to tell them a story, she and her siblings slept six to a bed, and they used to drink water out of jam-jars. One of her teachers recognised her talents and prophesied her future success as a writer. But it was only decades later when, convalescing after an illness, she had the time to pick up a pen and write. Her first book was accepted immediately and she has been writing two books a year ever since. Brenda was awarded an OBE in In the late eighties he burst onto television screens as The Joan Collins Fan Club, attracting a surprisingly broad audience with his extreme make-up and innuendo.

The son of a policeman and a probation officer, Julian was born and brought up in Teddington and Surbiton, and as a child was deeply religious. In recent years, Julian has toned down the make-up and innuendo in order to take on a new role — Julian Clary, family favourite, star of prime time.

Where once he had cult status, he now has serious mainstream appeal, recently presenting the new National Lottery show on BBC1 and reaching the final of Strictly Come Dancing. He has enjoyed a career spanning thirty years as a director, working with Orson Welles, Marlon Brando and Faye Dunaway as well as being the man behind the controversial Death Wish films starring Charles Bronson.

Born in Octoberthe only son of Helen and George Winner, Michael was a shy and sometimes lonely child. Even as a very young boy he knew he wanted to be connected to the movie industry - projecting shadow pictures and devising his own commentary when he was only five years old. At the age of fourteen he was given his own showbusiness column in his local paper - which was syndicated across more than two dozen titles.

His first film,This is Belgium,was notable for being largely shot in East Grinstead. He says that while he admires directors who tackle social issues, he always wanted to be part of the glamour of Hollywood, making films that weren't to be taken too seriously and that were just a bit of fun. But his route into photography was circuitous. He began studying law and then economics in his native Peru but finished neither course.

He had a short spell in America before arriving in London and he says he immediately loved it here. But the early years were tough; he struggled to convince anyone at the glossy magazines to look at his work. Half the trouble, he says, was that he was ringing people from call boxes - and they would hang up before he'd had time to put in any money. But years of building contacts within the industry - and building trust among his models - have paid off and he is now as much as a celebrity as the women he photographs.

His most famous pictures are those he took of Princess Diana looking confident, relaxed and happy, just months before she died. They have now been reprinted for a two-year long exhibition and he says that when he saw them again in the lab, it brought a knot to his throat. But she says her route into classical music was far from straightforward. Her musical break-through came at the age of 29, when she was asked to stand in as the Countess in The Marriage of Figaro at the last minute.

Breakfast with Frost ran for twelve years until early Married to an Italian woman and with two young sons, he now divides his time between life in London and in Italy.

She is about to star in the play 'Whose Life is it Anyway? She was born in Liverpool but grew up in Canada and decided to be an actress at a young age. She says a formative experience was appearing in a school play 'Piffle It's Only a Sniffle' when she took the role of a cold germ which had to infect the other children by tickling them with a feather until they sneezed.

She spent time in drama schools in Canada, Liverpool and New York and says now that her first love is theatre - and her film roles allow her to feed her theatre habit.

He is the first black principal dancer at Covent Garden; Tocororo, the show about his own life, that he wrote, choreographed and starred in, broke box office records at Sadlers Wells and in his homeland of Cuba he is a national hero. But his extraordinary success has followed an even more remarkable journey from the impoverished back streets of Havana.

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We will always respond as soon as possible. We try to keep these arrangements as simple as possible - explained as follows: 1. Within the UK, anyone who wants a printed copy of future catalogues is required to become a subscriber. This subscription can be ordered in the same way as all other items - by adding to the order made by phone, fax, web order, email or post against code CAT 3. There is of course no charge related to this. The only other stipulation is your annual subscription has to be place and up to date.

For customers outside of the UK - There is no change to previous arrangements and no subscription is payable. We will continue to decide on a case by case basis as to which customers should be sent a catalogue. The only real criteria we adopt is recent order record; presuming you have bought relatively recently, you should remain on the mailing list. Recognised as the biography of Chet to read. Acknowledges the talent and achievement, but is harrowing in its portrayal of the decline.

A good read, not as dry or heavy as it sounds here! A riveting pictorial autobiography with photographs across pages that covers reminiscences and thoughts on his years with Dr Feelgood, outer space, India, drugs, guitars, Shakespeare, guns and lots more. Not a conventional autobiography but a must for fans. Anecdotes from record shop workers left baffled and bewildered by the strangeness of customers.

Bonus features include interview with Stan. German film maker accompanies Arhoolie boss Chris Strachwitz down south. Classy Special edition package of separate DVD releases at a lower price. The Torture Never Stops. Held in Vancouver intary that incorporates live footage and The Torture Never Stops is this includes 14 performances with Bob Brozman, Alvin Youngblood another live from shows.

A stage footage, clay animation sequences and more. Three storming live performances. From Midnight Tour was filmed in Berlin in With 27 tracks over minutes.

A fabulous package. Definitive story. As a bonus, there is an interview with Miles. A triumphant stored from the original footage with remixed return to the Cork Opera House, fortunately captured and re-mastered sound, with classic performances from Sonny by Irish broadcaster RTE.

A gem. Filmed in Cork, showing locations, photographs and anecdotes. London in and the only DVD currently available of the band. Restored, re- Recorded in England infeaturing an acoustic and electric set. DVD only edition leg video. As a bonus there is also a Southend Show in French-made documentary on the Chicago Only previously available on Cajun community of Louisiana, with a strong emphasis on the bootlegs of dubious quality, this historic ap- music pearance on stage of members of the Rolling Stones Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood and Ian Stewart with Muddy and his band plus appearances by Buddy Guy, Junior Wells and Lefty Dizz is now available on this legitimate release - and in its fullest form and with superior sound and picture quality.

HL Newport Jazz Festival The legendary documentary now on DVD. An intimate portrait of our Sam as his mixes with family, friends and in performance on his own and with other blues musicians, including Mance Lipscomb.

One hour of bliss. Highly recommended. Live in Sydney, inc. Film maker, and member of New Lost City blues. A fabulous Rockpalast. Mix of performance ing favourites, new numbers and guest appearances from Paul and studio footage, interviews and rare photos. Also contains a behind-the- from his career-shift in the early s to more recent times.

Only known footage of band. And bonus features differ for each also. Hailed by some as one of ests and abilities. His blues side, with horns. With a detailed booklets to help tutorial. An hour and a half tutorial into playing loads of off-colour blues classics musical collaborators inc. John Mayall and journalists. Rude but instructionally so! A tutorial cords. The story of the extraordinary record label, including archive footage of Apple artists, location film, interviews with staff and featuring 10 Bukka White classics.

Wood Years — Documentary on the music and career during the period, including rare archive footage and interviews with music experts and associates of the band. Documentary on the history of the band including interviews with musicians, producers, biographers, friends and managers who were intimately involved with the band.

Also includes archive interviews and footage. A 4 hour step-by-step guitar tutorial through 15 classic songs. Over 70 minutes of entertainment. Academy Award-nominated documentary of 57 jazz legends that met in Harlem in for a historic photo session.

An intimate, behind-the-scenes diary of life on the road, filmed as Satisfaction was climbing the charts in This was shot during a tour of Ireland and features their first professionally filmed concert performances and a growing set of adoring and frenzied fans. A fantastic live performance from Nashville with excellent guest support. Beat In a TV studio. Classic footage of a master. An hour of Freddie in a TV studio at his peak.

Back in print and available again. Career retrospective commencing with two pieces filmed for Library Of Congress infollowed by a series of other performances up until With 14 performances from various concerts. Live in concert in In concert plus Eric talking about his life and music. Traces the life and career of one of the greatest electric blues guitarist ever. Stunning album, produced by Jack Nitzsche.

Hi classics ton, Beck and Page on guitar. Detailed notes and full colour poster. BT Totally Essential Bluegrass. BT Soul Early Classics. Bo Diddley. Plus The Riddle. His first album as album coupled with his s album with Memphis Slim. Excellent album from a Red Lick favourite. Loads of classic sides Rory Gallagher: The Collection. Greatest hits plus 2 previously unreleased tracks Blues Guitar. A CD of early sides from each.

An exhilarating live set, incorporating blues, folk, jazz, western swing and more. Two crazed and riotously funny albums together. A music video collectionwith Double Trouble and with brother Jimmie on the Family Style album.

From vaults of Chicago independent label. Killer album from blues harp ace. Gorgeous mature soul from a master, the best of his Malaco years. Handy himself! Excellent 20 track overview of the best of a great band. Skatalites, Maytals, Pyramids, etc. Only album recorded together by Stevie Ray and Jimmie. A fantastic collection. Excellent and increasingly hard-to-find story of To be paid for promptly. East, New York N.

Y Hip-O Select. Bown-home s feel, with contemporary remixes. UK group facility at www. Only Queen Of Hot Gospel. Fierce state-of-the nation CD. And great music also!. Debut solo album from of Steely Dan front man Warners. Super soundtrack to s bio pic of Richie Valens. Super recordings originally issued on LP by Biograph.

King: Sweet Little Angel. Spoken word vignettes over cool jazz of Chico Hamilton. A rare big-band outing for Monk. Ackermann Tape archives, some of the great names in jazz are Albums Collection. Jazz Quartet, Ella Fitzgerald and more. Rare live recordings. Two albums originally on Jazzland. Previously unavailable and excellent sounding radio Previously unreleased sides with the Jazz Couriers, his broadcasts featuring Miles in the company of Wayne Shorter, Chick an overlooked classic.

Also has four bonus tracks. The DVD features performances drums. Plus five bonus tracks. Four bers bass and Connie Kay drums ; the other with a larger band. Preston trumpet and Dannie Richmond drums. A long unavailable collection re-issued with extra tracks, now totalling This edition includes as a bonus a rare jazz pianist on nine lovely tracks. Plus interview as a bonus. Two albums Of The s. Fantastic film noir music. Rolls Vol 2. Cream of West albums from the early s originally on Roulette.

Coast jazz Verve and Roulette solos recorded in as a tribute to the music of Bessie Smith. Lewis, Sidney Bechet, etc. Over 4 hours of superb jazz ivory European Jazz Fantastic collection of some Nina Simone and more. An excellent overview.

His Johnson, and Billy Strayhorn. Porrhaus, with local musicians. Live in Italy. Four earlys albums from altoist. Immaculate solo album jazz trumpeter, with an album recorded as a member of MJT. Recorded in concert in Lucerne, Switzerland in featur- Him! Two studio albums together from A Two sessions from and Bonus tracks. Sublime summit Quintet: Back Door Blues. Pioneering West Coast meeting of jazz guitarists.

Former Mingus sideman with his own tion. Sessions ing, lively and wise tracks. Lots of hot 20s jazz. Two Hammond organ soul-jazz albums originally for Prestige inboth with Grant Green on guitar. A collection of New York broadcasts from various venues by legendary jazz trumpeter. Also features Buddy Rich on drums. Re-issue of long deleted album incorporating four different dates in New York in On CD now for first time. Jazz pianist, vocalist and composer - and one-time accompanist to Roland Kirk, Sonny Rollins, Joe Henderson, Cecil Taylor and more with new 11track album featuring jazz standards and four unique originals.

Jazz vocalist in front of super band on 9 tracks from Founding father of jazz organ on a re-issued album with arranger Lalo Schifrin. IC J. Trombonist and tenor saxophonist together on some sessions in New York.

If you like this, try IC also has more from the same sessions. Live in Paris in Feb A tremendous nine tracks fromfeaturing Al Cohn on tenor sax. Dynamic, lyrical and varied, with great playing and a superb sound. The glorious trombone of J. Johnson and cool vibes and piano of Milt Jackson may be the most prominent but all musicians shine.

Mids ballads released as an album on Prestige plus 8 bonus tracks. All existing sides as taken from 8 albums, including Junior Mance on piano. Plus a 28 page booklet. Late s sessions that became five studio albums, plus alternate takes, live sides and a complete Oscar Pettiford album and rare Gigi Gryce sextet session.

With a detailed booklet. Four mids albums, bonus tracks and a 20 page booklet. With full booklet. Rare material highly prized by fans of this great jazz guitarist. Davies Collection Vol 1: ss. Orchestra, Eddie South and more. Fess Williams, Duke Ellington, etc. Jazz; Ornette!

Rendez-vous (Cold Rush Remix) - Various - DJ Case Dance & Hands Up (07/08/09-2013) (File), Un Évènement Important (Wichtige Begebenheit) - Robert Schumann / Martha Argerich And Friends - Musi, Paul Armfield - Tennyson (CD, Album), Fire Burning (Manox Remix) - Various - Dance Nation 2 - Your Big Night Out (CD), Infra-Rae - Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers - The Jazz Messengers (Vinyl, LP, Album), Cant Stop - Tesla - Psychotic Supper (CD, Album), Josefsson - Kalle Sändare - Kalles Blandning (Vinyl, LP), Together - Robert Farnon And His Orchestra - Sunny Side Up (Vinyl, LP, Album), Kiss Me - Sabrina - Sabrina (Cassette, Album), Quand Je Menai Mes Chevaux Boire - Malicorne - Almanach (Vinyl, LP, Album), Hold On (Wont Let Go) - Steven Tyler - Were All Somebody From Somewhere (CD, Album)

A new word cropped up in the American lexicon: Jazz. Leopold Stokowski led the Philadelphia Orchestra in its first recording session -- for Victor Records. Heifetz was a year-old sensation who had played the violin since age 5. It was the first American orchestra to make a European tour. Wagner's "Die Walkyrie" opens in Paris. The opera, "Martha", aired from the Denver Auditorium. Amelita Galli-Curci makes N. The Detroit News owned the radio station at the time. McConnell quickly became a legend in the medium.

It was released on the General record label. Alma Cummings danced the fox trot, one-step and waltz with half a dozen partners, sets record of 27 hours. The first U. It was the beginning of the country music recording industry.

Benny Goodman was 14 years old as he began his professional career as a clarinet player. He took a job in a band on a Chicago-based excursion boat on Lake Michigan. George Gershwin's groundbreaking symphonic jazz composition Rhapsody in Blue premieres with Gershwin himself playing the piano with Paul Whiteman's orchestra. The composer, himself, was at the piano this night. The first country music record to sell one million copies reached that point on this day.

He became a Country Music Hall of Famer in Oh, and Barry Manilow. Russian composer, Igor Stravinsky, appears in his first American concert, as he conducts the New York Philharmonic Orchestra in a program of his own compositions. Louis Armstrong recorded My Heart, starting a career that brought him worldwide fame.

Commissioned by Walter Damrosch, American composer George Gershwin presented his "Concerto In F", and was also the featured soloist playing a flugelhorn in a slow, bluesy style as one of his numbers. Goodman was 17 years old. Benny Goodman played a clarinet solo. This was not unusual for Benny except that it was his first time playing solo within a group recording session. The first opera to be broadcast over a national radio network was presented in Chicago, IL. Listeners heard selections from Faust.

This was the first symphonic work that called for an airplane propeller and other mechanical contraptions not normally associated with the ballet. Gene Austin waxed one of the first million sellers. He played the club until The tune came from the Broadway musical, Showboat. It was the very same night that Sir Thomas Beecham gave his first public performance in the United States. The featured vocalist on the track was year-old Paul Robeson. The song became an American classic.

Playing drums for Wingy was a young sideman named Gene Krupa. The second talkie the opposite of a silent movie for Al Jolson was released. It was titled The Singing Fool, which he certainly was not. DeFord Bailey cut eight masters. Three songs were issued, marking the first studio recording sessions in the place now known as Music City, USA.

Rudy Vallee and his orchestra recorded Deep Night Victor disc The classic was recorded just three weeks after the stock market crash that plunged the nation into the Great Depression. Hoagy Carmichael recorded with Louis Armstrong. Lewis was heard as the featured vocalist as well, on the tune that has been recorded hundreds of times and is an American music standard.

Georgia on My Mind has been the official state song of Georgia since The song has been recorded by many artists over the years. Not per week, but for the entire season! Clyde McCoy and his orchestra recorded Sugar Blues on this day.

It became a major hit for both artists. Eugene Ormandy later, conductor of the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra. The pair were part of the orchestra vocal quartet that also featured Nye Mayhew and Saxey Dowell in Satchmo would use the tune as his theme song for decades.

The song was waxed in Chicago, IL. The singer became a super-hot property after the debut. Martin became one of the big names in the music business. Rodgers was in failing health at the beginning of the session, but persevered to complete the job at hand. The singing star died nine days later he was His recording career began in His yodel became a trademark of his music.

Jimmie Rodgers recorded over songs and sold millions of 78 RPM records. His songs were about the Depression and many were about trains. He died of tuberculosis. Twisting and turning behind two huge fans, one might wonder just how exciting the fan dance could possibly be. It is important to realize that Ms. Rand was, um, naked during the performance. Caterina Jarboro became the first black prima donna of an opera company. The singing telegram was introduced on this day.

The first person to receive a singing telegram was singer Rudy Vallee, in honor of his 32nd birthday. The program continued on the network until National Barn Dance was broadcast from the Eighth Street Theater in Chicago, where the stage was transformed into a hayloft every Saturday night. The host was Joe Kelly. The track featured trombonist Glenn Miller, who also vocalized on the tune. The song was fairly popular, but became a much bigger success when comedian Jack Benny made it a popular standard.

Bing Crosby became the first singer to record for the newly created Decca Records. She was backed by the Johnny Green Orchestra. The tune was recorded for Brunswick Records. Nelson Eddy recorded Ah! Sweet Mystery of Life for Victor Records. The song came from the film, Naughty Marietta. Later, Eddy recorded the classic tune with Jeanette MacDonald. Ella Fitzgerald recorded her first sides for Brunswick Records. She was featured with Chick Webb and his band.

Ella was 17 at the time and conducted the Webb band for three years following his death in Many people considered this Goodman classic the beginning of the swing era. Victor record was recorded by Tommy Dorsey and orchestra. Ethel Leginska became the first woman to write an opera -- and conduct it. The tune was recorded at Decca Records in Los Angeles.

The first pop music chart based on national sales is published by Billboard magazine. The song became such a standard, that, literally, hundreds of artists have recorded it, including a vocal version by Barry Manilow; believe it or not.

Peter and the Wolf, a symphonic tale for children by Sergei Prokofiev, had its world premier in Moscow. This was the day that big band icon Woody Herman played in his first recording session.

He waxed Wintertime Dreams Decca disc Jimmy Dorsey who would later be host, himself led the Kraft Orchestra. The Academy Award-winning song was featured in the movie Waikiki Wedding. The popular musician was Benny Goodman. Harris would move to TV stardom and continue as a popular vocalist during the s with such hit songs as The Thing.

Duke Ellington and his band recorded the classic, Caravan, for Brunswick Records. The distinctive vocal on the tune is provided by Skinnay Ennis. Benny Goodman and his quartet recorded Smiles for Victor Records. The tune was a Fletcher Henderson arrangement. Red Norvo and his orchestra recorded the Russian Lullaby on the Brunswick label. Norvo did more famous work at a later date, recording with a singer named Dinah Shore.

Following Carnegie Hall performances in both andArtur Rubinstein presented another historic and highly acclaimed performance at the arts center this day. Three lovely ladies, known as The Andrews Sisters, recorded Decca record number this day.

The special guests during this broadcast were Glenn Miller and his orchestra. The song became the one most often associated with the singer. Benny Goodman refuses to play Carnegie Hall when black members of his band were barred from performing.

Bea Wain was heard warbling the vocals on the tune. Jack Leonard was featured as vocalist. Shaw was married to Ava Gardner at the time. Clarinet virtuoso Artie Shaw recorded the song that would become his theme song. Nightmare was waxed on the Bluebird Jazz label. Haggart whistled and played bass, while Bauduc played the skins. Billy Butterfield was featured on trumpet. The tune would become the theme of the band.

It was not, however, recorded in the Quaker City of Philadelphia. The song was waxed in New York City. The tune became a standard for the band. Thanks for the Memory became Decca record number Many other standards by the group soon followed. Satchmo lent his vocal talents to this classic jump tune. The vocalist on that number, who went on to find considerable fame at Capitol Records, was Martha Tilton. Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians recorded one of the most popular songs of the century.

Listening carefully after the first minute or so, one can hear Helen Forrest sing the vocal refrain. Larry Clinton and his orchestra had a number one song with a similar arrangement of the same tune that same year. It later was a hit for saxophonist, Nino Tempo and his sister, April Stevens in Hundreds of versions of this song have been recorded through the years, making it one of the most popular standards of all time.

One of the classic theme songs of the Big Band era was recorded for Decca. Listening carefully, one might note that the lead trombone is not that of Tommy Dorsey, but of Dave Jacobs, instead. Belly up to the bar for this one. Patti, Maxine and LaVerne turned this song into a giant hit. Both NBC and Mutual carried the event, which was attended by 1, people in the casino ballroom.

An audience of 18, people waited patiently at Madison Square Garden in New York City to hear the piano virtuoso Ignace Jan Paderewski begin a much-anticipated piano recital. However, the year-old former premier of Poland was unable to perform for the enormous crowd. The serial continued for eighteen years on radio. Frank Sinatra made his recording debut with the Harry James band. Charlie Barnet and his orchestra recorded Cherokee for Bluebird Records.

Teagarden provided the vocal on the session recorded in Chicago, IL. Sixteen-year-old singer Kay Starr got a big break. Starr was filling in for Marion Hutton who, at the last minute, was unable to attend the recording session. Judy Garland sang one of the most famous songs of the century with the Victor Young Orchestra. The tune became her signature song and will forever be associated with the singer-actress. Garland recorded Over the Rainbow for Decca Records. It was the musical highlight of the film, The Wizard of Oz.

Eddy Howard was the vocalist on the piece. A chap named Fletcher Henderson tickled the ivories on this classic. It later became a big hit and a signature song for Lionel Hampton, who also played on this original version of the tune.

That singer was the feature of the Weems band for many years before going solo as a radio, TV and stage star. His string of hits for RCA Victor spans four decades. He was an NBC mainstay for years and years.

One of the classics was recorded this day. A kid singer named Frank Sinatra was the featured vocalist on what was his seventh recording. Broadcast Music, Inc. Jack Leonard was the featured vocalist. It became the theme song for the band that recorded it, the Benny Goodman Band. Harry James and his big band recorded Concerto for Trumpet -- on Columbia 78s. Handy of Memphis, TN one of the legendary blues composers of all time, recorded the classic St.

Louis Blues. The minute, twice-a-week show was sponsored by Chesterfield cigarettes and was heard for nearly three years. A young trumpet player named Billy May was featured. This version, recorded in Hollywood on Bluebird Records, is recognized as his best rendition of the classic song.

The song was her signature song until she starred in South Pacific in The session was in Chicago, IL. Frankie replaced Jack Leonard as lead singer with the band. One of the great classic songs of the Big Band era was recorded. The flip side of the record released on the Bluebird label was Danny Boy. The famous Blue network series included several distinguished alumni -- among them, Dinah Shore and Zero Mostel. The tune was waxed on the famous Bluebird record label. Pennsylvaniathe classic Glenn Miller signature song, was recorded on Bluebird Records.

Looking at the original label on the old RPM disk, we find record numberin fact. The song went on to become one of the most familiar big band themes of the era. Jimmy Dorsey and his orchestra recorded the classic, Perfidia, for Decca Records. The song would later be a hit for The Ventures Will Bradley and his orchestra recorded one of the best of the Big Band era. The song, on Columbia Records, was so long it took up both sides of the 78 rpm platter.

Cabin in the Sky opened for the first of shows. Taking a Chance on Love is the one big hit that came from the musical. Guy Lombardo and the Royal Canadians recorded one of their lesser-known songs for Decca. Xavier Cugat and his orchestra recorded Orchids in the Moonlight on the Columbia label. The inch, 78 rpm record ran six minutes including flipping. The ban lasted for ten months.

Many radio stations had to resort to playing public domain songs, such as marches and operas, to keep their stations on the air. Even kids songs were played over and over again until the ban was lifted. One of the most popular songs to be played was Happy Birthday to You; which was performed in many different languages just to get past the ban. Decca record was recorded. It seems she sang the song in the film, That Night in Rio.

She sang the classic song with Charlie Barnet and his orchestra on Bluebird Records. This song became the sign-off melody for Kaye and other big bands. The four Modernaires joined to sing with the Glenn Miller Band on a permanent basis beginning this day. Artie Shaw and his orchestra recorded Moonglow on Victor Records. Jimmy Dorsey and his orchestra recorded the classic, Amapola, on Decca Records. Photoplay magazine urged readers to forget the fox trot and learn the lindy hop.

A diagram of the new dance step was featured. A decade later, Les Paul and Mary Ford added a vocal to the tune, making it one of their biggest-selling hit songs. The vocal on the piece was done by Ronnie Kemper. The song was on Columbia Records, as was the Arnaz version years later. Singer Paula Kelly joined Glenn Miller's band. Her husband, also a part of the Miller organization, was one of the four singing Modernaires.

Glenn Miller began work on his first motion picture for 20th Century Fox. The film was Sun Valley Serenade. Lunceford began with the Chickasaw Syncopaters, a piece band, in the late s. Hildegarde was the elegant singer with the long white gloves who was accompanied by the Harry Sosnik Orchestra.

Lena Horne recorded St. Louis Blues for Victor Records and launched an illustrious singing career in the process. She was 23 years old at the time. Horne continued performing well into her 60s. Cab Calloway and his orchestra recorded the standard, St.

James Infirmary, for Okeh Records. Sonny Dunham and his orchestra recorded the tune that was to become Mr. Memories of You was Bluebird record Ray McKinley was featured. The song that would become the theme of bandleader Tony Pastor was recorded. It was Blossoms on the Bluebird label.

The recording featured the trumpet of Bobby Hackett. By Aprilthe song was a solid hit. A musical standard was recorded this day on Victor Records. Lena Horne sang the torch classic that became her signature: Stormy Weather. Stormy weather Jimmie Lunceford and his orchestra recorded Blues in LP Night on Decca.

Between and Jimmy Lunceford had more hits 22 than any other black jazz band except Duke Ellington and Cab Calloway. The record went on to be a big hit for Kyser. The Mills Brothers waxed one of their three greatest hits. LP Doll became Decca record Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra recorded Well, Git It!

Ziggy Elman was featured on the session which was recorded in Hollywood. Sy Oliver arranged the Dorsey classic. Vaughn Monroe and his orchestra recorded the classic, Sleepy Lagoon. It was the last song Monroe would record for Bluebird Records. Vaughn sang on the track while Ray Conniff played trombone. Both later moved to different record companies. The big-voiced baritone of Monroe was regularly heard on radio and he was featured in several movies in the s.

He died in May, Racing With the Moon and Ghost Riders in the Sky were two of his greatest contributions to popular music. The biggest selling record of all time was recorded. The song was written for the film Holiday Inn. The practice would soon become common among most record labels. The recording session, you may have guessed, took place in Manhattan. Capitol Records first number one hit made it to the top this day. It was one of their first six records released on July 1.

The song is featured in the movie of the same name. Peggy Lee recorded her first hit record -- in New York City. His last side was There are Such Things, which became number one in January of Sinatra moved on to Columbia Records as a solo singing sensation.

Helen Forrest sang on the million-seller. Frank Sinatra bid adieu to the Tommy Dorsey Band as he started his solo singing career. It was time for Miller to go to war. The show had aired three times a week for three years. Miller had volunteered for wartime duty. An estimated policemen were called out to help curb the excitement.

It is said that some of the teenage girls were hired to scream, but many more screamed for free. After Pete Kelly's Bluesshe appeared in sporadic movie cameos, in St. She was also frequently featured on The Ed Sullivan Show. Perhaps her most unusual and intriguing performance was of the "Three Little Maids" song from Gilbert and Sullivan 's comic operetta The Mikado alongside Joan Sutherland and Dinah Shore on Shore's weekly variety series in Fitzgerald also made a one-off appearance alongside Sarah Vaughan and Pearl Bailey on a television special honoring Bailey.

Inshe performed a medley of standards in a duet with Karen Carpenter on the Carpenters' television special Music, Music, Music. Fitzgerald also appeared in TV commercials, her most memorable being an ad for Memorex.

Ella Fitzgerald Just One of Those Things is a film about her life including interviews with many famous singers and musicians who worked with her and her son. It was directed by Leslie Woodhead and produced by Reggie Nadelson. It was released in the UK in Fitzgerald had a number of famous jazz musicians and soloists as sidemen over her long career. Possibly Fitzgerald's greatest unrealized collaboration in terms of popular music was a studio or live album with Frank Sinatra.

Pianist Paul Smith has said, "Ella loved working with [Frank]. Sinatra gave her his dressing-room on A Man and His Music and couldn't do enough for her. Fitzgerald had suffered from diabetes for several years of her later life, which had led to numerous complications. She died in her home from a stroke on June 15,at the age of Fitzgerald married at least twice, and there is evidence that suggests that she may have married a third time.

Her first marriage was into Benny Kornegay, a convicted drug dealer and local dockworker. The marriage was annulled in Together they adopted a child born to Fitzgerald's half-sister, Frances, whom they christened Ray Brown Jr. With Fitzgerald and Brown often busy touring and recording, the child was largely raised by his mother's aunt, Virginia. Fitzgerald and Brown divorced indue to the various career pressures both were experiencing at the time, though they would continue to perform together.

She had even gone as far as furnishing an apartment in Oslo, but the affair was quickly forgotten when Larsen was sentenced to five months' hard labor in Sweden for stealing money from a young woman to whom he had previously been engaged. Fitzgerald was notoriously shy. When she got into the band, she was dedicated to her music She was a lonely girl around New York, just kept herself to herself, for the gig.

From toFitzgerald resided in St. Fitzgerald was a civil rights activist; using her talent to break racial barriers across the nation. Granz required promoters to ensure that there was no "colored" or "white" seating. He ensured Fitzgerald was to receive equal pay and accommodations regardless of her sex and race. If the conditions were not met shows were cancelled.

InFitzgerald established the Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation focusing on charitable grants for four major categories: academic opportunities for children, music education, basic care needs for the less fortunate, medical research revolving around diabetes, heart disease, and vision impairment. In addition, she supported several nonprofit organizations like the American Heart AssociationCity of Hope, and the Retina Foundation.

The primary collections of Fitzgerald's media and memorabilia reside at and are shared between the Smithsonian Institution and the US Library of Congress [77]. In Fitzgerald was the first African American female to win at the inaugural show. In she received an honorary doctorate of Music from Yale University.

The career history and archival material from Fitzgerald's long career are housed in the Archives Center at the Smithsonian 's National Museum of American Historywhile her personal music arrangements are at the Library of Congress.

Her extensive cookbook collection was donated to the Schlesinger Library at Harvard Universityand her extensive collection of published sheet music was donated to UCLA. Harvard gave her an honorary degree in InNewport News, Virginia created a week-long music festival with Christopher Newport University to honor Fitzgerald in her birth city.

Callaway's album To Ella with Love features fourteen jazz standards made popular by Fitzgerald, and the album also features the trumpeter Wynton Marsalis.

Bridgewater's album Dear Ella featured many musicians that were closely associated with Fitzgerald during her career, including the pianist Lou Levythe trumpeter Benny Powell, and Fitzgerald's second husband, double bassist Ray Brown. Bridgewater's following album, Live at Yoshi'swas recorded live on April 25,what would have been Fitzgerald's 81st birthday. Austin's album, For Ella features 11 songs most immediately associated with Fitzgerald, and a twelfth song, "Hearing Ella Sing" is Austin's tribute to Fitzgerald.

The album was nominated for a Grammy. InWe All Love Ellawas released, a tribute album recorded for the 90th anniversary of Fitzgerald's birth. Folk singer Odetta 's album To Ella is dedicated to Fitzgerald, but features no songs associated with her.

For Ella Sinatra's recording of " Mack the Knife " from his album L. Is My Lady includes a homage to some of the song's previous performers, including 'Lady Ella' herself. The theater is located several blocks away from her birthplace on Marshall Avenue. InRod Stewart performed a "virtual duet" with Ella Fitzgerald on his Christmas album Merry Christmas, Babyand his television special of the same name. There is a bronze sculpture of Fitzgerald in Yonkers, the city in which she grew up, created by American artist Vinnie Bagwell.

Ed Dwight created a series of over 70 bronze sculptures at the St. On January 9,the United States Postal Service announced that Fitzgerald would be honored with her own postage stamp. In Aprilshe was featured in Google Doodledepicting her performing on stage.

It celebrated what would have been her 96th birthday. It featured rare footage, radio broadcasts and interviews with Jamie Cullum, Andre Previn, Johnny Mathis, and other musicians, plus a long interview with Fitzgerald's son, Ray Brown Jr.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. American singer-songwriter. Newport News, VirginiaU. Beverly Hills, CaliforniaU. Benny Kornegay. Ray Brown. Decca Verve Capitol Reprise Pablo. Musical artist. This section does not cite any sources.

Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. April Learn how and when to remove this template message. Further information: Ella Fitzgerald discography. Further information: List of awards received by Ella Fitzgerald. Retrieved October 29, Ella Fitzgerald. March 11, Retrieved December 21, His name has become synonymous with glittering evenings based on classical favourites; with concerts often topped off with lasers, fireworks and light displays.

It's a long way from his early days, when he toured the country with a small troupe of singers and a pianist. Then, venues would pay him 84 guineas to put on a Viennese Evening or a Gilbert and Sullivan Night and he had to pay the musicians and cover the cost of transport and hotels before he earned a penny. He was brought up in a small Welsh village and, after his mother died, lived with his father, grandmother and widowed aunt.

His father taught him the piano when he was a child and in his teens he gravitated towards the oboe and went on to study at the Royal Academy of Music.

His first musical career was as a jazz musician - he won first prize at the Montreux Jazz Festival and played venues as diverse as Carnegie Hall and Ronnie Scott's. In the s, he gave up life on the road and started writing advertising music and jingles.

More awards followed, but he felt cramped by the nature of the work and wanted to write music that was more expansive.

A track which he'd written for a minute long commercial went on to become the corner-stone of his most well-known work, The Adiemus Project. He's said that it was only then that he realised his niche lay in composing work that was grounded in his classical upbringing but also benefited from his interest in jazz and world music. And, while critics have on occasion, sneered at his work; he has collected countless gold and platinum discs and a worldwide audience.

His first novel was published when he was 23 and as well as a series of children's books featuring the 'super spy' Alex Rider, he's also penned a slew of television crime programmes including Murder Most Horrid, Midsomer Murders and Foyle's Law. He first turned to writing when he was at boarding school; he was desperately unhappy and it offered some form of escape.

His childhood was peopled by Dickensian figures - although he was brought up in lavish surroundings, his parents were distant and he was brought up by a string of nannies; while he so hated his domineering grandmother that he literally danced on her grave after her death. Perhaps it is unsurprising that his books often deal with the fragility of childhood and the robustness of children. A father now himself, he says he envies his own children their confidence and happiness.

He says that he doesn't consider his work great, or even important - but he does like to think it agreeable and surprising. Gifted with perfect pitch, she studied under Clifford Curzon and enjoyed a highly successful career as a concert pianist.

They had met at a literary lunch he was hosting — and became friends after Natasha stayed behind to help him with the washing up. She is now the executor to Sir Stephen's very considerable estate and is writing her own memoirs.

Gee, Officer Krupke! She was born and raised in a small village in County Clare, where the only books in the house were prayer books which sat alongside her father's bloodstock magazines. Her mother thought writing was in essence sinful and tried fiercely to stop her becoming an author. She was living in England when she published her first novel, The Country Girls, in It was a huge hit and was critically well received - but in Ireland she was decried and her book burnt in the streets.

He says science fiction is not so much a prediction of the future as a metaphor for the human condition; and for him, at least, writing it offered an escape route and a filter through which to view his own extraordinary upbringing. He grew up in a small Norfolk village in a very devout and austere home. While his father was distant, his mother was still suffering from the grief after her first child, a daughter, was still-born. He was the second child and even when he was very small, remembers feeling a strong sense of his mother's disappointment in him.

The army finally offered a way out for him and it was on his return to England that he started writing seriously while also working in a bookshop.

One of his early works was a short story describing the sadness felt by a boy who was never able to please his parents, which was turned into a film by Stanley Kubrick.

While he remains best known for his science fiction writing - and has won every major award in the field - he has also written novels, poetry and biographies and short stories. Now, he says, he aims not for high sales but to become a better and better writer. He is drawn to the simplicity of Christmas carols and says he loves being able to compose 'a hummable tune'.

Inspired and encouraged by his school education, he became Director of Music at Clare College, Cambridge, and then with a string of winning commissions already behind him, moved into full time composition. But his relationship with composition is a difficult one - it's a process he finds isolating and says that although it does not make him happy - he feels compelled to do it. However, once he has finished a work he says nothing in the world compares with the feeling he experiences when he conducts it for the first time.

He says: "I write music that people will enjoy singing. I'm not ashamed of that". However, he says his father was an expert in reading body language and he learned from him how people's physical behaviour reveals their inner thoughts.

But his route into academia was a curious one - and his life inside the ivory towers far from smooth. His father was killed in the war and he was brought up by his extended family in a peripatetic childhood. He joined the army but, with no war to fight, left his commission and went to university instead. He finally hit rock bottom while in America and stopped drinking 23 years ago. Today he is a pre-eminent literary figure - combining erudition and historical research with a taste for the modern and the new.

It was an image he later sought to discard and he certainly did so in the film Lolita, where his portrayal of Humbert Humbert reopened the controversy about the desires of a middle-aged man for a fourteen-year old girl. In the film The Mission he played a gentle Jesuit missionary and went on to act as his own stuntman, climbing a perilous waterfall.

It was his performance in Reversal of Fortune that won him an Oscar for Best Actor as the real-life character Claus Von Bulow, accused and acquitted of the attempted murder of his wife. Later this month, he returns to the West End stage after almost twenty years to star in the play Embers, a story of friendship and betrayal.

He won an Oscar for his film Darling which starred Julie Christie, and became a household name with his television series The Glittering Prizes.

He was born in Chicago but came to England as a boy - where, his father advised him, he could grow up to be 'an English gentleman' rather than 'an American Jew'. While his parents did not want to disown their faith, nor did they want to be defined by it and they were very cautious about the way Jews were perceived in Britain before the Second World War. He was one of only a handful of Jewish boys at boarding school and was isolated and miserable there.

But his loneliness led him to the solitary pursuit of writing - an occupation where he could right the wrongs he had suffered. A bright pupil, his own glittering prize was winning a scholarship to Cambridge — after that, he said, no other success in his life could compare.

For the past fifty years he has split his time between London, France and Greece - accompanied all the time by his wife, Sylvia-Betty.

On Desert Island Discs he gives a personal insight into his own life and career. In a moving interview recorded in his home in Jerusalem, Daniel Barenboim talks frankly about their relationship and the cruelty of her illness; he reveals his own musical influences and also discusses his plans to spend more time playing the piano, after stepping down as Music Director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra later this year.

Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. Label Deutsche Grammophon Rec No: 7. The C Sharp Maj. She was spotted by the great choreographer Sir Kenneth Macmillan at the age of 16; though tall for a ballerina she had an energy that he found refreshing. Her first child was born prematurely as a result of the life-threatening condition pre-eclampsia.

Her speedy recovery she put down to her strength and fitness, and she returned to dance three months later. She has announced her decision to retire as a Principal of the Royal Ballet next month, though she will continue to dance as a guest artist. His most recent work has been more biting — his Westminster satire The Thick of It dissects the relationship between politicians, their spin-doctors and the media they want to control.

A highly academic child at a Jesuit school, in his teens he harboured ambitions to become a Catholic priest. His parents thought he might become a doctor or lawyer, but after getting first class degree from Oxford, and spending three years writing a thesis about religious language with reference to Milton, he concentrated on comedy instead.

He joined the BBC and ended up producing the radio comedy programmes he had listened to as a child. Born in FifeRankin came from a working class background in a coal-mining town where he says he spent most of his childhood trying to 'look like he fitted in'. In his bedroom he would live out a fantasy life, writing poems, stories and creating strip-cartoons.

He admits there are many parallels between himself and Rebus - they lived at the same Edinburgh address, both are fond of a drink and now they even share the same taste in music, though unlike Rebus, Rankin has never smoked.

However all that is about to change; Rebus has reached the age of retirement in the police force and Rankin's next novel will be the last in the series. Words and language have always formed an important part of his life. The son of two teachers, he was born into a London, Jewish family, and brought up in a home full of literature, conversation and debate.

His poems often rely on snatches of dialogue and memories from his own childhood and relate his experiences with his own children. More recently he's published a series of memories aimed at adults rather than children.

In particular, these attend to the central tragedy of his life, the sudden death of his second son Eddie, when he was 18 years old. He is the mastermind behind more than a hundred number one songs in Britain and abroad and Westlife, whom he signed, holds the record for the having seven consecutive number one songs in the UK.

A lot of his early successes were gimmicky hits — singing wrestlers, the Power Rangers and Teletubbies — but it was first Robson and Jerome and then Westlife who brought him credibility. His tenacity and his ability to spot a seller were already legendary within the music world when he devised a format for a television show that would bring new talent to the fore.

And they've made Simon Cowell a celebrity too. His shows play to the aspirations of the young, who believe fame and fortune can be theirs. The group will perform at Leeds on the Friday August 27, A. They will play in Reading on the Saturday 28, A. What does such an influential musician listen to when he wants to relax or feel inspired? Melody Maker put him to the question in Some of his answers may surprise you, others may not. We used to follow The Birthday Party about, they were the ones that were responsible for getting us a deal with 4AD.

Not a bit like the Cocteaus? Naah, it was that big guitar noise you got on 'The Friend Catcher' that was one of the things that inspired us. I've got a lot of time for Nick Cave. Every couple of years I retune myself into what's he doing, even the sea shanty stuff as some people call it. I'm a sucker for wasted types, men who can wear tight trousers and pointy shoes without looking like a pillock.

Me, I turned out the wrong shape to be wasted! I love the arrangement of it, the movement, the way it built up. This was just as we were starting out and maybe it influenced the way we built our sound up. It was before she became a born-again Christian and started talking about the evils of homosexuality when most of her fans were on the Hi-NRG circuit.

The Pop Group: "She is beyond Good and Evil" "I haven't actually heard this in years but it sums up a particular moment in time for me. Again, it was the noise he [Mark Stewart] made. He's still really good now. The Pop Group were the first ones ever to mix post-punk with fun and dance rhythms.

But it was always harder than the ones doing it now. I know we weren't suppposed to have stars but we were still awestruck even though we could approach them anytime backstage, in a way you couldn't with Bowie and T Rex.

The last time I saw Nick properly was a couple of years ago back in Sao Paolo. We got ourselves in a horrible state. So we made a demo, made two copies, sent one to Peel and one to 4AD.

We chose 4AD, it never occurred to us that 4AD might not choose us. We thought it was a dead easy to get a record deal because we were so great - we were fucking crazy. Anyway, 'Lonely Planet', what a fucking record. He was only about 20 when he made it.

I didn't have much time for the things he was doing a few years back but with his last album I'm right back into him. Them and Roxy Music were the first people I ever heard using keybroads like machines and not just Hammond organs.

The first album was great. You try sitting alone, fucked up on drugs, late at night, listening to that 10 minute track, 'Frankie Teardrop' - you'll fucking die! It's so scary. After that, they went on to make a lot of crap. It's not particularly the militant thing about them, it's more from hearing it in the clubs, the noise it makes.

I don't know if it's exactly changed my life. I went through a phase a couple of years ago of not listening to anybody else's music at all, but just this past year I've had an incredibly refreshed attitude, I've rekindled my love. Also, I used to have a problem about listening to other people's stuff.

The way I saw it, if theirs was good it meant mine must be crap. I've had a few problems in my head with that, I can tell you. It's not being competitive, it's insecurity and it meant not being able to own up to liking other people's stuff. It's only now I can do something like Rebellious Jukebox. The other Voice! Patsy Cline died odd years ago, so it was a bit tricky getting her to join the Cocteaus so I had to get Liz. Just go pick up her greatest hits. King of the poncey ballads, Roddy!

I love him. I've been an obsessive collector of Phil Spector's stuff, I've got loads and loads on vinyl, a lot of rarities. Nice tunes, big sounds - yeah, it was an obvious influence. It was just him, his guitar and voice, so beautiful, so moving - what a fucking guy. And I was waiting out back to meet him and I did.

Y'know what he said to me? There was a time when liking a record meant I would have had to go out and find out everything about the band, these days, as long as it's a good fucking record, I really don't care - which is the way it should be, I suppose.

But this is another of the records that's got me listening to music again. John Lennon's somebody I never even listened to until a few years ago. Same with The Doors, Dylan - I shut all these people out because punk rock told me to.

And the wealth of stuff I was denying myself! Punk had always seemed such a positive energy to me that i never saw the negative side of it People think that? Oh, no! We're still making records nbow the way we did then, that's the bottom line - in the same uncontrived, honest way, doing what the fuck we feel like. London: A. Topping the list is the Byrds' "Chestnut Mare.

It's one of the first really great country rock songs, it's very poppy and has some really great guitar playing by Claret ce White. I was in high school when I first heard it, but I didn't fully get into it until I was something. It has a realty nice string sound. So I chose both, I love the way songs can sound very intimate and not laboured at all. They're both love songs: one to a lover and one to a mother. Their individual personalities come through. It's a really old beautiful story about this fictional woman who is killed by a rich person who has wealthy parents.

What I like about the song is that it is such a direct, honest and pure social commentary and a story at the same time. I saw Dylan not so long ago in LA.

I honestly didn't know what to expect, but he was great. He was the first person I made a connection with. I thought if he could write these odd songs with an odd voice, then maybe I could do it too.

Initially, I was drawn to the madcap character of Syd. I saw them once and they blew people away. The guitarist broke a string so he ran out to the van for an inordinate amount of time.

He then tuned his guitar at a deafening volume for ages, it was mad. It's a country rock epic. Gram Parsons is someone who I've liked for quite a while and, in a sense, I emulate him in certain ways. Our music reflects our personalities. I think! I'm sure they learnt a lot from Gram Parsons. The singer, Ryan Adams, is really talented. It just amazes me how he weaves this little story. It sounds like it could have been written 50 years ago.

It's such a great pop song. I love all the different voices Sly Stone used, and the way he incorporated different band members. The interpretation of the lyrics changes as each band member sings. It's got a lotta soul and it's a great summer party song.

The women would be outside in the back doing the washing, rubbing away on the rub-boards, and s0meb0dy else sweeping the yard, and somebody else would start singing "We-e-e-ll Nobody knows the trouble I've seen Or "Sometimes I feel like a motherless child, a long way from home I used to go up and down the street, some streets were paved, but our street was dirt, just singing at the top of my voice.

There'd be guitar players playing on the street-old Slim, Willie Amos, and my cousin, Buddy Penniman. I remember Bamalama, this feUer with one eye, who'd play the wash-board with a thimble. He had a bell like the school-teacher's, and he'd sing, "A-bamalam, you shall be free, and in the mornin' you shall be free.

I imagine people had to sing Album) feel their connection with God. To sing their trials away, sing their problems away, to make their burdens easier and tIle load lighter. That's the beginning. That's where it started. We used to have a group called the Penniman Singers-all of us, the whole fam ily. We used to go around and sing in all the churches, and we used to sing in contests with other family groups, like the Brown Singers, in what they called the Battle of the Gospels. We used to have some good nights.

I remember one time. I could always sing loud and I kept changing the key upward. Marquette said it ruined his voice trying to sing tenor behind mel The sisters didn't like me screaming and singing and threw their hats and purses at us, shouting "Hush, hush, boys-hush! From a boy, I wanted to be a preacher. I wanted to be like Brother Joe May, the singing evangelist, who they called the Thunderbolt of the West. My daddy's father, 'Walter Penniman, was a preacher, and so was my mother's brother, Reverend Louis Stuart, who's now pastor of a Baptist church in Philadelphia.

I have always been basically a religious person-in fact most of the black people where I'm from was. We used to draw the crowds all the time. The places were always packed. I was popular around those states before Chuck and Lee Diamond joined the band. I got two sax players and named the band the Upsetters.

It made me outstanding in M"col1 at that time, to have this fantastic band in a little town like this. The other bands couldn't compete. So when it s"id "Little Richard and the Upsetters" everybody wanted to come. We had a station. We were each making fifteen dollars a night, and there was a lot you could do with fifteen dollars. We would play three, four nights a week-that's fifty dollars. And sometimes we would play at a place on the outskirts of Macon at a lllidnight dance. That would pay ten dollars and all the fried chicken you could eat.

I re ally looked up to Billy Wright. That's where I got the hairstyle from and everything. We'd play all around Georgia, Tennessee, and Kentucky, cos we had" big n"me around those places. We would draw packed houses every place and we'd get a guarantee and a percentage of the take over the guarantee. We were making a darned good living. One song which would reallv tear the house down was "Tutti Frutti. We were playing without a bass and Chuck would have to bang real hard on his bass chum in order to get a bass-fiddle effect.

He was talking wild, thinking up stuff just to be different, you know? I could tell he wi's a mega-personality. So we got to the studio, on Rampart and Dumaine. They were Fats Domino's session men. Let me tell you abou t the record ing methods we used in those days.

When I started there was no tape. It was disk to disk. There was no such thing as overdubbing. Those things we did at Cosimo's were on tape, but they v"ere all done straight ahead.

The tracks you heard were the tracks as they were recorded from begilll1ing to end. We would take sixty or seventy takes. We were recording two tracks. Maybe we might go to surgery and intercut a track or cut a track at the end or something, but we didn't know what overdubbing was. The studio was just a bi'ck room in a furniture store, like an ordina. For the whole orchestra. There'd be a grand piano just as you came in' the door.

I'd have the gnmd's lid up with a mike in tbe keys and Alvin Tyler and Lee Allen would be blowing into that. Earl Palmer's drums were out of the door, where I had one. The bassman would be way over the other side of the studio. You see, the bass would cut and bleed in, so I could get the bass. The recording equipment was a little old quarter-inch single-chalmel Ampex Model in the next room. I would go in there and listen with earphones.

If it didn't sound right I'd just keep moving the mikes around. I would have to set up all those things. But, you see, once I had got my sound, my room sound, well then I would just start running my numbers straight down. It might take me forty-five minutes, an hour, to get that balance within the room, but once those guys hit a groove you could go on all night. When we got it, we got it. I would like to see some of these great producers today produce on monaural or binaural equipment with the same atmos phere.

Cos the problem is, if you're going to get a room sound with the timbre of the instruments, you can't put them together as a band and just start playing. All of a sudden one horn's going to stick out. So I had to place the mikes very carefully and put the drummer outside the door. Well, the first session was to run six hours, and we phmned to cut eight sides. Richard ran through the songs on his audition tape.

I did not even record it. But "Wonderin' " we got in two takes. Then we got ''I'm Just a Lonely Guy," which was written by a local girl called Dorothy La Bostrie who was always pestering me to record her stuff.

But it wasn't really what I was looking for. I had heard that Richard's stage act was really wild, but in the studio that day he was very inhibited. Possibly his ego was pushing him to show his spiritual feeling or something, but it certainly wasn't coming together like I had expected and hoped. The problem was that what he looked like, and what he sounded like didn't come together. If you look like Tarzan and sound like Mickey Mouse it just doesn't work out. So I'm thinking, Oh, Jesus You know what it's like when you don't know what to do?

Let's go to lunch. I didn't know what to do. I couldn't go back to Rupe 1 with the material I had because there was nothing there that I could put out. Nothing that I could ask anyone to put a promotion on. Nothing to merchandise. And I was paying out serious money. So here we go over to the Dew Drop Inn, and, of course, Richard's like any other ham.

We walk into the place and, you know, the girls are there and the boys are there and he's got an audience. There's a piano, and that's his crutch. He's on stage reck oning to show Lee Allen his piano style. So WOW! He gets to going. He hits that piano, didididididididididi That's what I want from you, Richard. That's a hit l " I knew that the lyrics were too lewd and suggestive to record. It would never have got played on the air.

So I got hold of Dorothy La Bostrie, who had come over to see how the recording of her song was going. I brought her to the Dew Drop. Dorothy was a little colored girl so thin she looked like six o'clock. She just had to close one eye and she looked like a needle. Dorothy had songs stacked this high and was always asking me to record them. She'd been singing these songs to me, but the trouble was they all sounded like Dinah Washington's "Blowtop Blues.

But looking through her words, I could see that she was a pwlific writer. She just didn't understand melody. So I said to her, "Look. You come and write some lyrics to this, cos I can't use the lyrics Richard's.

Well, Richard was embarrassed to sing the song and she was not certain that she wanted to hear it. Time was running out, and I knew it could be a hit. I talked, using every argument 1 could think of.

I asked him if he had a grudge against making money. And finally, I convinced them. Richard turned to face the wall and sang the song two or three times and Dorothy listened. Break time was over, and we went back to the studio to finish the session, leaving Dorothy to write the words. I think the first thing we did was "Directly from My Heart to You. Those two I could have gotten by with-just by the skin of my teeth. Fifteen minutes before the session was to end, the chick comes in and puts these little trite lyrics in front of me.

I put them in front of Richard. Richard says he ain't got no voice left. I said, "Richard, you've got to sing it. That wild piano was essential to the success of the song. It was impossible for the other piano players to learn it in the short time we had. I put a microphone between Richard and the piano and another inside the piano, and we started to record it.

It took three takes, and in fifteen minutes we had it. So we decided to up the tempo on the follow-up and get the lyrics going so fast that Boone wouldn't be able to get his mouth together to do it! The follow-up was "Long Tall Sally. I got a call from a big disk jockey called Honey Chile. She fwd to see me. Very ur gent. I went, because we relied on the jocks to push the records, and the last thing you said to them was no. I went along to this awful downtown hotel, and there was Honey Chile with this young girl, about sixteen, seventeen, with plaits, who re minded you of one of these little sisters at a Baptist meeting, all white starched col lars and everything.

She looked like someone who's just been scrubbed-so out of place in this joint filled with pimps and unsavory characters just waiting to scoop her up when she's left alone, you know?

So Honey Chile said to me, "Bumps, you got to do something about this girl. She's walked all the way from Appaloosa, Mississippi, to sell this song to Richard, cos her auntie's sick and she needs money to put her in the hospital. I thought maybe you or Richard could do that. It looked like toilet paper with a few words written on it:. And I'm going to tell her about Uncle' John. Cos he was out there with Long Tall Sally, and 1 saw 'em.

They saw Aunt Mary comin' and they ducked back in the alley. And this is a song? You walked all the way from Ap paloosa, Mississippi, with this piece of paper? I kept it for years. Tt was a classic. Just a few words on a used doily! Honey Chile said, "Bumps, you gotta do something for this child.

I told Richard. He didn't want to do it. J said, "Richard, Honey Chile will get mad at us. Richard started to sing it-and all of a sudden there was "Have some fun tonight. Richard loved it cos the hottest thing then was the shuffle. Richard was reciting that thing. He got on the piano and got the music going and it just started growing and growing.

We kept trying, trying it, and I pulled the musi cians in and we pulled stuff from everybody That's where Richard's "Ooooooh" first came in. That's what he taught to Paul McCarh1ey. Well, we kept rerecording because I wanted it faster. I drilled Richard with "Duck back in the alley" faster and faster until it burned, it was so fast. I always liked that record, and I used to use the riff in my act, so when we were looking for a lead-in to "Good Golly Miss Molly" I did that and it fitted,".

The white kids had to hide my records cos they daren't let their parents know they had them in the house. We decided that my image should be crazy and way-out so that the adults would think I was harmless. I'd appear in one show dressed as the Queen of England and in the next as the pope.

They were exciting times. The fans would go really wild. Nearly every place we went, the people got unruly. They'd want to get to me and tear my clothes off. It would be standing-roam-only crowds and 90 percent of tbe audience would be white. I've always tbought that Rock 'n' Roll brought tbe races togetber. Although I was black, tbe fans didn't care. I used to feel good about that. Especially being from the South, wbere you see the barriers, haVing all these people who we thought hated us, showing all this love.

A lot of songs I sang to crowds first to watch their reaction, that's how I knew they'd hit, but we recorded them over and over again. I just took the rhythm of an old song of mine called "Directly from My Heart to You" slowed down and I used to do that riff and go "Sonya'" and I made it into "Lucille.

I was playing "Lucille" and "Slippin' and Slidin'" in my room in Macon way before [ started recording for Specialty. I'd make up the music while I was mak ing the words fit.

His name was Jimmy Pennick, but you know it was Jackie Brenston that gave me the musical inspi ration. Further Reading Altschuler, Glenn C. New York: Random House. As the most successful artist of the midS rock 'n' roll explosion, Elvis Presley had a profound impact on popular music.

His sense of style, musical and personal, was both the focal point of the media reaction to early rock 'n' roll and the inspiration for some of the most important rock musicians to follow.

The narrative of his meteoric rise and subsequent decline amid mysterious and tawdry circumstances fueled many myths both during his life and after his death at The S Assembly of God Church. Although he had little experience as a performer, inat age 19, he came to the attention of Sam Phillips, owner of a Memphis recording company, Sun Records. Philips teamed Presley, who sang and played guitar, with local country and western musicians, Scotty Moore guitar and Bill Black bass.

During their first recording session in junethe Give Me That Old Time Religion - Mahalia Jackson - Mahalia Jackson Vol. 1 (Vinyl recorded a single with "That's All Right, Mama" originally recorded in by blues singer Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup on one side and "Blue Moon of Kentucky" originally recorded in by bluegrass pioneer Bill Monroe on the other.

The group's style blended elements of country and rhythm and blues without being identifiable as either; the distinctive sound in cluded Moore's rhythmically oriented lead guitar playing, Black's slapped bass, and Presley's forceful, if crude, rhythm guitar, with the recording swathed in a distinctive electronic echo effect.

Presley's voice, however, attracted the most attention: Swooping almost two octaves at times, changing timbre from a croon to a growl instantaneously, he seemed not so much to be synthesizing preexisting styles as to be juxta posing them, sometimes within the course of a single phrase.

And although white musicians' music had incorporated African American instrumental and vocal ap proaches since the earliest "hillbilly" recordings of the os, no previ ous white singer had so successfully forged an individual style clearly rooted in a contemporaneous African American idiom. Presley, Moore, and Black released four more singles on Sun during ; each one featured a blues or rhythm and blues song backed with a country-style number.

Presley's uninhibited, sexually charged per formances throughout the Southeast provoked frenzied responses and influenced other musicians: By the end ofperformers, such as Carl Perkins and johnny Cash, had emerged with a style coined "rockabilly" that resembled Presley's.

Presley's first recording for RCA, "Heartbreak Hotel" released in Marchachieved the unprecedented feat of reaching the Top 5 on the pop, rhythm and blues, and country charts simultaneously. This recording and the songs that followed in all combined aspects of his spare Sun recordings with increasingly heavy instrumentation-including piano, drums, and background singers-that moved the sound closer to that of mainstream pop.

Both sides of his third RCA single "Hound. Presley's vocal style already showed signs of mannerism, trading the unpredictable exchanges of different voices of the early recordings for a single affect throughout each song. Although Elvis Presley did participate in some interviews throughout his career, the questions and his answers in these interviews tended toward the perfunctory e. It's not what you call folk music.

It's a beat that gets you. You feel it. King, Ike Turner, and Howlin' Wolf, including a session that resulted in the important proto rock 'n' roll recording, Jackie Brenston's "Rocket 88" with a band led by Turner in Phillips is also a natural-born storyteller, as revealed by many of the anecdotes in this interview.

He was working for Crown Electric. And there's no telling how many days and nights behind that wheel he was figuring out some way to come in and make a record without saying, "Mr, Phillips, would you audition me? There wasn't anything that striking about Elvis, except his sideburns were down to here [gestures], which I kind of thought, well, you know, "That's pretty cool, man.

Ain't nobody else got Album) that damn long," We talked in the studio. And I played the record back for him in the control room on the little crystal turntable.

QlIilin New York: St. Milrtin's Press, j, London: On1l1ibu, I'res5, 1g77 We got some pretty good cuts on the thing, but I wanted to check him out other ways before I made a final decision as to which route we were going to attempt to go with him. And I decided I wanted to look at things with a little tempo, because you can really hang yourself out on ballads or when you go up against Perry Como or Eddie Fisher or even Patti Page, all of those people.

I wasn't looking for anything that greatly polished. Why did. The two of them, they'd been around the studio, Lord, I don't know how many damned times, you know? Scotty had been playing with different bands, and al though he hadn't ever done a session for me, 1 knew he had the patience and he wasn't afraid to try anything, and that's so important when you're doing labora tory experiments.

Scotty was also the type of person who could take instruction real good. And 1kidded him a lot. What were YOIi tryillg to adlieve with Elvis? Now you've got to keep in mind Elvis Presley probably innately was the most introverted person that came into that studio. Because he didn't play with bands. He didn't go to this little club and pick and grin. All he did was set with his guitar on the side of his bed at home. So I had to try to establish a direction for him. And 1had to look into the mar ket, and if the market was full of one type of thing, why try to go in there?

There's only so many pieces in a pie. That's how 1 figured it. I knew from the be ginning that I was going to have to do something different and that it might be harder to get it going. But if I got it going, 1 might have something. That night we had gone through a number of things, and I was getting ready to fold it up. But I didn't want to discourage the damn people, you understand?

I knew how enthusiastic Elvis was to try to do something naturally. I knew also that Scotty Moore was staying there till he dropped dead, you know? I don't re member exactly what l said, but it was light hearted. I think I told him, "There ain't il damn song you can do that sounds worth a damn," or something like that.

He knew it was tongue in cheek. But it was getting to be a critical time, be cause we had been in till:' studio a lot. Well, 1 went back into the booth. I left the mikes open, and I think Elvis felt like, really, "What the hell have I got to lose?

I'm really gonna blow his head off, man. Ws said tlrat. I don't remember exactly verbatim. But it was something along the lines that I've been quoted. Scotty Moore says that when he heard the I"ayback he tlroUgllt " d be tim Olll of ' How did you feel when you heard it? First of all, Scotty wasn't shocked at any damned thing 1attempted to do.

Scotty isn't shockable. And for me, that damned thing came through so loud and clear it was just like a big flash of lightning and the thunder that follows. I knew it was what I was looking for for Elvis. When anybody tells you they know they've got a hit, they don't know what the hell they're talking about. But r knew I had it on "That's All Right. In my opinion.

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8 thoughts on “Give Me That Old Time Religion - Mahalia Jackson - Mahalia Jackson Vol. 1 (Vinyl, LP, Album)

  1. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of "Mahalia Swings The Gospel" on Discogs.

  2. Somebody Touched Me: A3: The Only Hope We Have: A4: There Is Power In The Blood: A5: I Asked The Lord: A6: Hold Me: B1: Give Me That Old Time Religion: B2: Leaning On The Everlasting Arm: B3: He's Sweet, I Know: B4: Somebody Bigger Than You: B5: Only Believe: B6: To Me It's So Wonderful.

  3. Complete song listing of Mahalia Jackson on blueskyservices.biz Tracks of Disc 1; $ on iTunes 1. How I Got Over (Mono) (Live) $ on iTunes 2. Trouble OF The World (Mono).

  4. blueskyservices.biz» Search results for 'give me that old time religion by mahalia jackson' Yee yee! We've found 2, lyrics, artists, and 48 albums matching give me that old time religion by mahalia jackson.

  5. Jun 21,  · Mahalia Jackson. The Forgotten Recordings. These rare sides were never issued anywhere until Mahalia’s death, and then only in France! So this low-priced track collection is an essential addition to any gospel fan’s collection; includes Give Me That Old-Time Religion; Lord Search My Heart; Throw Out the Lifeline; My Lord; It’s My.

  6. Jul 05,  · Jul 05,  · Mahalia was known for being a civil rights activist, but her contralto voice and love of singing brought her to the stage. Mahalia came to be known as The Queen of Gospel. She recorded hundreds of songs on 30 albums during her career. Over a dozen of her 45 RPMs (single hits) sold more than a million copies. She is a legend in the music industry.

  7. Sep 17,  · Sep 17,  · Mahalia Jackson - Forgotten Recordings music CD album at CD Universe, Mystery surrounds these never before reissued .

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