Microphone Fiend - Eric B. & Rakim - Follow The Leader (Cassette, Album)

You grabbed me with an open hand. The world is grabbing back at you. Delivered entirely with a sarcastic wink and a full heart, Beware of the Dogs proves across 13 life-affirming songs the power in sticking up for yourself, your friends, and what's right. LUNCH DIE With just one EP release to boot, last year's lauded Thrush Metal, she has already garnered worldwide critical acclaim and has an undeniably bright future ahead.

Secretly Canadian is proud to release Thrush Metal on vinyl for the first time on June 22, GREY A POEM CELLZ HYPE VIEWS AS ONE GET UP NOBLE LONER The album features guest contributions from Navy Blue, Standing on the Corner, as well as vocal samples of Earl's mother, Cheryl Harris, Earl's father Keorapetse Kgositsile who is credited posthumously, and an instrumental sample of Earl's uncle, Hugh Masekela, who is also credited posthumously.

VEINS The vinyl version of this album contains the exclusive bonus track: "Junkyard Priest" featuring Milky Burgess on slide guitar. This six-track, all-analogue affair is the follow up to 's 'Time To Die'.

Originally released on Island Records inAnother Green World is the perfect bridge between Brian Eno's s pop life and his early experiments with Ambient music.

It is a conceptual work intended as a soundtrack for imaginary films, although many of the pieces had already appeared in actual films.

M ERIC B. THE R The sample-friendly opus thats the inspiration for hip-hop, house and post punk. Music that falls outside of the no wave, new wave and post punk library, its for the dance floor but its not funk, theres no horns, no driving organ; its the opposite of Sly And The Family Stone but no less cool and no less groovy.

A lasting document of their unique brand of minimal funk that would influence subsequent post-punk, hip-hop, and dance music acts. Stripped down to the most basic of drumbeats and rudimentary bass lines, Come Away confirms the notion that the real rhythm is what happens between the beats. DANCE SOLAR Buzzcocks-style great rock album. LAUFT Crack-Up comes six years after the release of Helplessness Blues and nearly a decade since the band's self-titled debut.

In addition, the band has announced new tour dates, including their first North American shows since October All eleven of the songs on Crack-Up were written by Robin Pecknold.

The album was co-produced by Pecknold and Skyler Skjelset, his longtime bandmate, collaborator, and childhood friend. Fleet Foxes is Robin Pecknold vocals, multi-instrumentalistSkyler Skjelset multi-instrumentalist, vocalsCasey Wescott multi-instrumentalist, vocalsChristian Wargo multi-instrumentalist, vocalsand Morgan Henderson multi-instrumentalist.

Gatefold sleeve. LIFE FLOAT Five musicians took to the stage, launched into a song called Inhaler, and blew the roof off. For the 5,plus people who were lucky enough to be present that evening, the experience was more like a mass epiphany at a revivalist meeting than a gig. Foals whipped up a frenzy and sent it hurtling towards the audience, who gave it a shake and sent it hurtling right back. Two hours later, we staggered, reeling, out into the night. This was more than music.

This was alchemy. EXITS Excellent, well creafted tracks. Include download code with bonus tracks. TREES RIO DOLL BIG ME DOA HELL STILL RAZOR It became Aretha's 2nd Gold LP and remained on the charts for over a year.

GRIEF Despite the fact that Ian, Joe, and Brendan had been playing together for nearly a year, it was still early days for the band. Guy had only been a full member of Fugazi for a few months and only sang lead on one song "Break In". It would be nearly another year before he would start playing guitar with the band.

At that time, the studio was still located in the basement of engineer Don Zientara's family house. Joey Picuri aka Joey Pwho would later become one of Fugazi's longtime sound engineers, joined the band for the initial tracking. The sessions only lasted a couple of days, but tour dates and indecision about the tape would delay the final mix for another two months. Though the band was at first pleased with the results, it soon became clear that this tape would remain a demo as new songs were being written and the older songs were evolving and changing shape while the band was out on tour.

It was decided that the session would be passed out free as cassette copies, with the band actively encouraging people to share the recording. In the spring, Fugazi went out on its first U. The only song from the demo session that was formally released was "In Defense of Humans", which appeared on the State of the Union compilation in Now, some 26 years later, Dischord is releasing the entire first demo including the one song "Turn Off Your Guns" that wasn't included on the original cassette.

SONG 1 JOE 1. This year the band celebrates their 35th anniversary and are embarking on a massive North American tour where they will be playing this album in it's entirety. FREAK CATCH 23 The New Jersey-based band's third long player reveals a remarkably powerful rock 'n' roll outfit honed by two years of nearly non-stop touring. Songs like 'Bring It On', 'Orphans' and the rousing title track bristle and burn with the spirit of soul, the energy of punk, and the artistic ambition of any hall of famer you'd care to name.

The band began getting together for writing sessions at their longtime friend Kyle Roggendorf's basement in Parlin, NJ. BOXER You're The Man features all of Gaye's solo and non-soundtrack recordings fromwith most of the album's tracks making their vinyl release debuts.

Over the years, songs from You're The Man have been included on several CD releases but 15 of the album's 17 tracks have not been released on vinyl until now. Upon its initial release, Liquid Swords received critical acclaim for its complex lyricism and hypnotic musical style. Over the years, its recognition has grown, with a number of famous publishers proclaiming it as one of the greatest hip hop albums of all time.

Continuing with its Respect The Classics campaign, UMe will be reissuing the classic back on vinyl for its 20th anniversary. GOLD The first LP is a reissue of the original album. The second LP offers previously uinissued recordings, with a raw sound and including an alternate take of 'House Of Glass'. The second LP has 9 never before heard tracks that were from their original recording sessions, plus an alternate version of the single 'House of Glass'.

Both LP's stand out as two different records. TRANZ IDAHO By the age of 24, Ariana Grande delivered three platinum-selling albums in addition to nabbing four Grammy Award nominations and landing eight hits in the Top 10 on the Billboard Hot chart.

I TRY A WEA CHUMP SHE Higher priced reissue. Visions finds Boucher mining not just the clean brightness of Aphex Twin-like atmospherics, but also the immediacy of straight up mall-pop like Stacey Q's "Two of Hearts.

Pitchfork has given the release an 8. EIGHT SKIN A collection of the finer moments from The Growlers - a band of beach bums conjuring psychedelic musical concoctions from Sea Dreams studio in their hometown of Dana Point. The Growlers have been building a loyal following for the past two years by performing throughout Southern California and selling hand screened and burned CD-R's.

Over the course of one full length and eight EPs they have honed their songwriting and recording skills. The best of the best are here, so Are You In Or Out? Sunburned and salty, that term perfectly describes their distinctive melding of reverb heavy surf guitar and Bakersfield-style honky tonk with '80s post-punk. This is especially true of Chinese Fountain, The Growlers' fifth full-length set to be released on September 23rd via Everloving Records.

Everloving Records asked for a tour EP to freshen up their fall dates, and the band returned an entire album's worth of material! Their songwriting is in top form, and this lo- fi garage band delivers some seriously catchy tunes. ROW Features a brilliant performance recorded live in Italy in that finds the Gun Club on fire. Special green viyl with printed sleeve. Limited to 1, worldwide. Vinyl version includes digital download. LYD DINO The album was recorded last year in residency at London's Somerset House.

The exhibition, entitled 'Recording in Progress' saw Harvey, her band, producers Flood and John Parish, and engineers working within a purpose-built recording studio behind one-way glass, observed throughout by public audiences. DRIVE GHOST ASHES Includes detailed liner notes written by Rudi Protrudi of the Fuzztones as he recounts the dramatic turn of events that made this recording happen! Includes 5 additional bonus tracks of live Fuzztones performances!

But beneath all of that, Vol. In the lyrics, singer Jake Duzsik confronts death, isolation and hopelessness with an uncommon candor and intimacy. Album closer "Decimation" is the most radical move in the band's catalog to date: a gorgeous guitar ballad, a plea for purpose and meaning in a time that makes both feel impossible.

NC FIRE All but two of these studio recordings were made during a fertile period between January and Jimi's mastery and use of the studio as a proving ground for new songs resulted in a growing collection of extraordinary material. This 2xLP collects 20 songs spanning his career from his first recordings with the Jimi Hendrix Experience in to his last with Billy Cox and Mitch Mitchell in It is the first comprehensive collection of Hendrix's songs overseen by Experience Hendrix, a family company that took over management of his recording legacy in Fifteen songs with the Experience are included and five with Hendrix's later groups often referred to as Gypsy Suns and Rainbows and the Cry of Love touring band.

ANGEL And while these autumnal sides bear some of the frayed vocal moments often heard on Holiday's '50s Verve sides, the majority here still ranks with her best material. NOT U SO SHE This classic LP collects some of his finest singles fromraw and powerful stuff that is as important as any from Hooker's entire career. Often featuring just Hooker and his guitar, or with a small backing combo, these tracks are sparse and deep, as real as the blues ever were.

Produced by Segarra and engineered by Andrija Tokic Alabama ShakesSmall Town Heroes features twelve new, original songs all written or cowritten by Segarra, with support from a vivid cast of Crescent City musicians.

Now reissued on black vinyl. JUNE GREAT ZERO ONLY STUCK GLASS GABBY NYC PDA WAVES MASH U-LOVE Conceived as a "letter" to her son, Motor City is packaged in a limited-edition mailing envelope, complete with a handwritten message from Ma Dukes to J Dilla inside. BAD BIG SLEEP WANT Their sophomore album, Violent By Design, has sold over 85, copies and is regarded by many as one of the best independent hip-hop albums ever recorded.

Babygrande Records is proud to present The Psycho-Social LP which is the cult classic prequel to Violent by Design. Described by the Source Magazine as "ahead of it's time" and by CMJ as "A must own for anyone who cares about hiphop culture," The Psycho-Social was originally released only in limited pressings on vinyl That is until now Inprior to obtaining national distribution, Babygrande released the CD version to independent retailers nationwide and scanned over 40, copies.

Thanks to digital remastering, listeners can obtain the album Jedi Mind Tricks originally released inexactly as the artist intended. An out-of-print gem for the past several years, this vinyl version of Jedi's breakthrough album will thrill die-hard enthusiasts and collectors alike, while allowing Jedi's rapidly expanding fan base to discover this definitive version of the underground classic. Double LP in gatefold sleeve.

CRUSH In the process, they sacrificed the immediacy of the previous record, but they gained an epic and weighty feel. WORK KILL BELLE Features the new song "Just a Little Bit," which was produced by Jones and features her on vocals, piano, and organ along with Brian Blade on drums. UH OH Limited domestically priced version. BOY HOWL Finally, the cover photo of Janis smiling in a sunny park is as poignant a shot of her as exists. The album is considered the band's commercial breakthrough, and sold in excess of 5 million units worldwide and has been certified double platinum in the United States of America as well as platinum in Canada.

The album includes the hit single "You've Got Another Thing Comin'", which became one of the band's signature songs and a perennial radio favorite. Reissued on gram vinyl. FEVER Packaged in a gatefold, textured cloth sleeve. Includes an obi strip, inner sleeve and a folded, 6-panel, double-side poster. Includes a download code. I WISH The album features all of the band's classic tracks, plus two studio tracks released only on this format 'Shot At The Night', 'Just Another Girl'and one extra bonus track never before released on vinyl 'Be Still'.

The album features the singles 'Shadowplay' and 'Tranquilize feat. Lou Reed '. Psychedelic lo-fi garage rock. ELBOW NEIN Flying Microtonal Banana is King Gizzard's first-ever experience in microtonal tuning, which features intervals smaller than a semitone and not found in customary Western tuning octaves.

EMPTY MOTU is a face-melting musical assault concerned with the downfall of man, the death of the planet, the murder of the whole goddamn universe. It turns out, though, that once the doors open, it never closes.

That's because the Melbourne septet has ingeniously crafted what may be the worlds first infinitely looping LP.

Each of the nine, complex, blistering tracks on Nonagon Infinity seamlessly flows into the next, with the final song linking straight back into the top of the opener like a sonic mobius strip.

It's exactly the kind of ambitious vision that prompted Rolling Stone to dub the band "one of the most compelling collectives of art-rock experimentalists in recent years. BEAT Originally limited to copies. After 's Happy Birthday and playing guitar in Hunx and His Microphone Fiend - Eric B. & Rakim - Follow The Leader (Cassette inThomas seems to have perfected his garage rock pop with this self titled LP. Coming off like a cross between T. This record combined with his work with J.

Mascis in Witch proves that Thomas is an American treasure that will be serving up timeless rock for a long time to come. A wistful piano ballad at its core, the song wildly benefits from Thomas' romantic croon and the climax that bookends it. It's actually kind of difficult to imagine this as the kind of song King Tuff had in him.

Through all the hits and misses artists go through while expanding their songwriting breadth, surprises this satisfying are why artists step out of their comfort zone in the first place. Released for the first time in the US. LP Classic Rock. Tracking most of the album live in shared quarters, La Luz chose to leave in any happy accidents and spur-of-the-moment flourishes that occurred while recording.

Cleveland's newly fuzzed-up guitar solos-which now incorporated the influence of Japanese Eleki players in addition to the twang of American surf and country-were juxtaposed against the group's most angelic four-part harmonies to date. ALIEN 8 TODAY CHOKE MOTHS HOME Spanning their epic career, the unprecedented collection pulls immortal songs from the band's classic studio albums, one of the 20th century's most enduring bodies of musical work.

Beck In Black, a loving collection of LLC material from the onset line-up of Freddy J IV on the vocals and guitar crunch and Brenn Beck on the boom bap drum kit and blowing some harp - a fleeting piece of envelope pushing Blues to add to your collection.

G BOB HEAVY The band's 3rd release brings in the elements of heavy, heart thumping, trash blues stomp they're known for, but also showcases a wider range, with some slower numbers that will make you groove. Some say the band are " Country Trash" or "Industrial Redneck" rock.

Truly, one of a kind. OUTRO Clear vinyl packaged in a special clear plastic jacket with silk-screened artwork and red acetate insert! TAQN TAFFY SinceAlan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker - the married couple whose heaven-and-earth harmonies have always held the band's center - have pioneered a subgenre, shrugged off its strictures, recorded a Christmas classic, become a magnetic onstage force, and emerged as one of music's most steadfast and vital vehicles for pulling light from our darkest emotional recesses.

But Low will not commemorate its first quarter-century with mawkish nostalgia or safe runs through songbook favorites. Instead, in faithfully defiant fashion, Low will release its most brazen, abrasive and, paradoxically, most empowering album ever: Double Negative, an unflinching eleven-song quest through snarling static and shattering beats that somehow culminates in the brightest pop song of Low's career.

FLY They are all housed in a beautiful textured canvas box. Accompanying the records is a 12" x 12" book featuring archival imagery, an interview with Dean Wareham conducted by Noah Baumbach, and an oral history with the band and their producers. As the majority of these records were never released on vinyl outside of limited pressings, this is a boon to longtime fans and new listeners alike.

It finds Stephen in a playful, exploratory mode - recorded by himself in Oregon; Malkmus plays bass, organ, drum machines, a Roland and a Memorymoog alongside other instruments interspersed with loops and vocal effects. His first album as a solo artist sinceGroove Denied is a fine companion to Sparkle Hard, echoing the experimentation Auto-Tune, genre-dabbling found there. With digital download card. II BROWN TRY ME MY CUP Despite some powerful political tracks, Marley adopts a less fiery, more reflective approach than his previous outings.

Now available on gram vinyl in original artwork featuring the original gold metallic jacket with embossed lettering. PERM Mascis does almost all his own stunts, although Ken Miauri who also appeared on Tied to a Star plays keyboards and there are a few guest vocal spots. There is plenty of drumming on the dozen songs on Elastic Days. But for those expecting the hallucinatory overload of Dinosaur Jr's live attack, the gentleness of the approach here will draw easy comparisons to Neil Young's binary approach to working solo versus working with Crazy Horse.

This is a lazy man's shorthand, but it still rings true. Whether it comes to stealing hearts or wallets, Masked Intruder have upped their game on III in every way and it seems as if even Officer Bradford can't hold them back, although we're sure he'll try. Now available as a single LP on standard weight vinyl in celebration of Capitol Records' 75th anniversary.

Delivering anthemic harmonies, furious power chords, and larger-than-life melodies, the Philadelphia-based garage-punk four-piece amply fulfills that mission while achieving something much more deeply nuanced. SKIT HERO V. THE M. DULL BUSY VOMIT JULY Featuring two more tracks than the original release of The Clown this is the complete sessions Mingus recorded from February to March Including the original version of one of his most well-known tracks, "Haitian Fight Song", The Clown is a great album that is one of the earliest Mingus releases to show his compositional excellence as well as his stretched-out and complex sound.

Another essential Mingus title on Wax Love. Available on limited edition translucent gold vinyl! Pressed on clear vinyl with printed inner sleeve. WE ARE LIVES United by their passion for music and love for mid 90s emo, the band set out to create a sound that was distinctly their own.

GUM PUPS Original album art and audio masters. IF I AM This exclusive collection will feature several rare remixes, unreleased demos and freestyles to commemorate the anniversary. A collection of folk, country and rockabilly-inspired Ness originals, plus covers. The bonus track "Company C" is exclusive to the vinyl release. SUPER 16 SUPER 78 LP Prog Rock. CRAZY Their dark, brooding sound has inspired more artists than could be listed and their continued adoration today is testament to the forward thinking yet inward projected music and lyricism of a young band on the brink of success yet unsure of how to deal with it.

With the sad passing of Ian Curtis, from the ashes rose New Order; the same core band but with a new fresh approach to their chosen career path. Loud, colorful and full of life. EASY ESME SADIE WISH Remastered audio on gram vinyl with remastered artwork and more. PIGGY POLLY BREED BLEW DUMB OF ME Originally released in'Nirvana' features the rare and previously unreleased studio version of "You Know You're Right," the last song the band ever recorded, available exclusively on this compilation, plus 13 other classics.

First time on vinyl for this amazing album! Great songwriting from a then young band. BND ACHE NEW WOOD ALONE After the resounding success of the series, NOFX have been met with endless requests for a soundtrack including all the rare and exclusive songs 5 previously unreleased from the show. Well, fans can finally stop their pleading, because the official Backstage Passport Soundtrack is finally going to be available on CD and LP.

Packed with 15 tracks from both seasons. Guided by the collaborative influence of producer Cameron Webb Motorhead, Alkaline Trio, Social Distortion, Pennywisethe album busts out of the gate with the amped up "Six Years on Dope" and never looks back. From the ultra-melodic word-play of "Oxy Moronic" to the charging desperation of "I Don't Like Me Anymore", First Ditch Effort flexes the broad spectrum of NOFX's abilities and delivers on the musicianship, wit, and element of surprise that fans have come to expect.

Vinyl comes with a digital download coupon. DIG FLEAS REEKO This gives us what we expect from a NOFX show: equal parts punk rock and comedy hour, chock full of all the wit and hijinks you can handle. All 14 songs are played true to their original form. Ribbed- Live in a Dive makes you feel like you were actually there. Just crank up the heat, and cram all your friends into a small room, and you're instantly transported to a NOFX show from LP comes with digital download coupon, and 2' x 3' two-sided poster.

EL LAY BOB WARM After several attempts at constructing a solid lineup for the band, Palermo met Brandon Setta. Setta and Palermo would handle the writing for the next release: the very rare 12" EP "Suns and Lovers" a play off of the D. Lawrence book that was released on Japanese boutique label Big Love Records.

It was limited to copies and the bands' share was donated back to the label for a Tsunami Relief Charity. On Yes Lawd! With soaring strings, gritty vocals, and ultra cool cinematic flourishes that sound like the soundtrack to a forgotten Blaxploitation flick, the album manages to sound both super contemporary and like a bona fide classic.

Despite its October release date, this is a definite summer record, essential for backyard BBQs, driving with the windows down, and sitting around the pool. WNGS SUEDE JODI Paak's vocals. REMIX The soundtrack for the music-heavy film, titled Music From The Motion Picture Baby Driver, boasts 30 multi-genre tunes in total, including 29 rare tracks and deep cuts, as well as one original song created by Danger Mouse specifically for Baby Driver.

Note the single is included on the track list of the 2 CD package, but only on the Download Card included in the vinyl format. Filter by gender:. Lyrics: Dime Benji Baby. Eco-Cide Moondog Wily. Hustle Game Buk Joe. Goodbye Yo Gotti. Monster Jay-Z. Monster Rick Ross.

Saint Claude Christine and the Queens. Vegenocide Cannibal Accident. You Decide Usher. Nada Mikel Ovalle. No Issue Future. C'est Moi Marie-Mai. My Life Lil Scrappy. Chosen Trippie Redd. Wir waren mal Stars TorchToni-L. And even so, they were going to get over. And he was right. The sound of Run-DMC comes at you without excess. When they trade verses, it is more like a dialogue than a jumbled conversation. Run- DMC traveled the same road but did so in a way commensurate with their no-nonsense image:.

The lack of a solution to such problems is less surprising than the absence of sentimentality. The music itself was stripped down, not disco derived and even without the rhythmic flourishes of funk. Another related shift was that this new style in rap incorporated a rock-and-roll aesthetic.

His combi- nation of drum-machine beats and recycled rock guitar helped make the Beastie Boys album Licensed to Ill a number-one record. The formal evolution of MCing was brisk. With his DJ Eric B. His ability to break up his lines and to balance that fractured phrasemaking with generous enjambment suggests how the rhythms of jazz were making their way into the music.

That just like really got the ball rolling in terms of creativity as a lyricist. Nor was Rakim alone in making more of flow and figurative language than had been heard before in rap.

Big Daddy Kane was also changing the scene. When he developed a conceit it would usually be in service of slicing up other MCs:. Usually, however, rather than developing conceits, Kane was likelier to pro- liferate promiscuous strings of similes, as if he had so many options at his poetic disposal that restricting himself to one was miserly:.

Big Daddy Kane also exemplifies a trend toward rappers developing a more elaborate and sophisticated persona. The combative rapper had been around for a while, as had the occasional lover man.

But Kane, like LL Cool J, attempted and largely achieved the creation of a more organic persona that brought verbal warfare and romantic love or sexual conquest to- gether. One way that a persona is successfully developed is through a convinc- ing narrative. Thus it is no surprise that the increasing detail and range of the stories being told in rap provided a context in which a more interesting and complete persona could thrive.

Slick Rick, for instance, was continuing the evolution of rap storytelling without ever letting the listener forget that just as important as the story was the teller who told it. That connection be- came especially strong in a rising genre that would become a powerful force—namely, gangsta rap. A young black man who is an anarchist, a hedonist, and a nihilist all rolled into one.

Such a perfect fit between a character and the language that character uses was once designated by the critical term decorum. This might be the last word under which anyone would class the explicit lyrics of NWA, which hardly strike most listeners as decorous.

Yet in terms of constructing a character whose actions, setting, and speech all exist in a relationship of unobtrusive propriety, the lyrics of NWA may serve as a model of the term. Decorum in this sense is an august literary value. Latin critics elaborated on the topic, often arranging decorum into stylistic tiers. In addition to this sense that simplicity itself is an elaborate perfor- mance—a kind of verbal puppeteering with the strings kept hidden—a common thread in descriptions of the plain speaker is the use of everyday words by everyday people to describe everyday actions and things.

In terms of diction, NWA adhere to the plain-style edict that less is more. There is even a dearth of multi- syllabic words, especially in rhyming positions where such words would draw particular attention.

Another factor in the successful creation of the gangsta archetype is the infrequent use of obtrusive poetic and rhetorical figures. Unlike the lines of Rakim, those of NWA stay away from internal rhyme, sticking almost without exception to end rhyme. Unlike the delivery of Big Daddy Kane, that of Ice Cube resists bending words athletically to force them into a rhyming relation.

This paucity of elaborate poetry is matched by the simplicity of the storyline. Instead of traveling across a whole country or continent, we merely move through the city of Compton.

The limited range of motion—the characters seem to know only the violent streets of one city and to shuttle from there to prison and back—compounded by the limited range of action—they fight, they get fucked up, and they hunt for sex with futility—suggests a limited life. It is to the aesthetic credit of the song that the unrepentant aggression of its per- formance gives what could be a claustrophobic circumscription instead a feeling of audacity.

Another way in which NWA employ limited means to suggest the ex- pansion of limits is in their use of expletives. In fact, that seemed to be the only thing they wanted to talk about. Like generations of three-card monte men before them, they rapped about rapping, explaining how the trick worked even as they pulled it off. You can hear this on virtually any earlier hip-hop record.

They were riveting storytellers, and they realized, long before many of their peers, that hip-hop storytelling was built on a paradox. How could any rapper be convincing if he kept reminding his audience that he was merely a rapper? How could he draw listeners into his narratives if he re- fused to stay in character?

But the gangsta persona in the later s was matched by a different vision of the direction in which rap should travel. Where Rakim and Big Daddy Kane had made relatively subtle allusions to the Five- Percent Nation ideology derived from the Black Muslim movement, X- Clan and others came straight out with a pro-black message that was steeped in arcane terminology.

Chuck D of Public Enemy scattered his lyr- ics with references to Malcolm X, Louis Farrakhan, and other radical black leaders, and his rhetorical style was that of the modern-day prophet crying out against a racist and overly commercialized society.

There was a didactic impulse at work in these artists, as well as a sense of rescuing rap from frivolity. One persona that developed as a result was that of the teacher.

His example shows, however, that the teacher in rap will often pitch his lesson far outside the conventional classroom. Their lesson plan was an eclectic one, and what was being taught was creative engagement, not only with a range of external sources, but with the ultimate source of the self. Both the increased empha- sis on self-realization and the widening of the tent under which one could rap are also manifest in the changing nature of women rappers. It was a rich time for rap.

Maybe it was more of a barter economy, since so many wonderful verses were being traded. Or maybe an economic conceit is less appropriate than an environmental one. If the rise of Run-DMC and the sparse sounds of Def Jam equaled a kind of sonic slash-and-burn, a deliber- ate clearing of the old growth of the old school, then the landscape that re- mained was ripe for a burst of new and varied life that had been until then unimagined.

And grow the new sounds did, proving that an art form that had only a few years before been dismissed by some skeptics as a fad was in fact real and self-sustainable. T he career of the Beastie Boys now spans almost three decades. The move from punk to Microphone Fiend - Eric B. & Rakim - Follow The Leader (Cassette was more natural than it may appear; the two musics share a basic timeline, a rough-hewn aesthetic, and an irreverent view of authority.

These characteristics meshed perfectly with the Rick Rubin—produced Def Jam template of drum-machine beats and heavy rock guitar samples. Sonically, the music was marked by manic sampling and a wide-ranging repertoire of beats. Lyrically, their now familiar high jinks ex- panded to include a new penchant for pop cultural similes. On Check Your Headthey continued to hone their skills while moving in yet an- other direction—this time back to their punk past, as many of the tracks featured the group playing their own instruments.

Subsequent years brought such releases as Ill CommunicationHello Nasty! John—yeah, Mr. Hell, no! B ig Daddy Kane was an originator and a trendsetter. Eschewing old school reliance on rhymed couplets and simple similes, Kane ex- panded the terms of lyrical acceptability and innovation. His booming voice, rich with command, and his battle-anybody mentality have made him an enduring figure in hip-hop. Over the next six years, he released four more albums and a slew of rap hits. He cultivated a personality that was at once gangster tough and lover-man smooth.

Like his contemporary Rakim, Kane focused closely on craft. Looking back on his career, he reflected on aspects that he has consciously honed over the years. And, plus, I believe that I really tightened up my flow. RAW Here I am. I get RAW. Now, yo. So just quit, submit, forget Huh—you must be on some new improved shit! Dope or dog food? Aww, shit! Pst, picture that! He delivers his words like a lava flow—hot and unhurried, but faster than they seem.

BDP can be credited with helping to effect two important changes in rap. Second and often passed overBDP laid the foundation for gangsta rap. The first of their albums, Criminal Mindedhad the duo on its cover amid grenades and shotgun shells. By All Means Necessary also featured KRS on the cover with a gun, but the lyrics suggested a more conflicted persona. It is finally as a teacher, however, that KRS has most made his mark. His lectures can take the form of disses, rhetorical question-and-answer sessions, self-catechisms, genealogies, and political broadsides.

Most of all, though, KRS-One is giving poetry lessons. Yes, yes I think very deeply In about four seconds a teacher will begin to speak. The king or the teacher? I wanna tell you a little somethin about us. Wake up! Take the pillow from your head and put a book in it. Is it because the black man is the original man? Or does it mean humanity is African?

P erhaps it was the Day-Glo cover of its debut album. It all added up to Album) La Soul being de- scribed at first as a group of hippies. Actually, De La Soul was—and re- mains—a necessary group of hip-hop eclectics.

Their first album, Three Feet High and Rising —produced by Prince Paul, a member of the rap group Stetsasonic— pulled in a wide range of sounds like some crazy magnet in the ear. What made it all function and not merely funny or frivolous was that the lyrics matched the sonic variety with their own wide range of themes, genres, and forms. But despite the dark humor, the music was flourishing. And so De La Soul continues to this day, trailing with them a train of records and a deserved reputation for artistic integrity.

This song does not contain explicit lyrics, but what it does contain is an undesired element. This element is known as the basehead, the lowest of lowest of all elements that exist. And the sad thing is, this particular element. Remember that day? Slipped me a smile for a twenty crack vial Guess what? Should I punch ya?

Should I use my tools? No, I got another way to earn my defeat, ah! Slam the child on the hard concrete. My, my, my. What happened to the people? The people who used to care about what took place in the world today? Can I get an Amen? Hit me! Forgive us. Where them crackers at? Them crackers that they serve, where they at? Did he ground you? And who the man holding heat?

Hey, yo, and how was the skins? And how high? Yo, what up, huh? Mixing crimes with life enzymes Taking the big scout route and niggas no doubt Better than they know their daughters and their sons Oh, boy. R akim is among the most influential artists in the history of rap, with a style that is as relevant today as it was when he first emerged in the mids. Along with Eric B. As a young man, Rakim played the saxophone, a skill to which he as- cribes some of his rhythmic sensibility and timing as a rapper.

He finds lyri- cal inspiration in his urban surroundings, in popular culture, and in the ar- cane lore of the Five-Percent Nation, or Nation of Gods and Earths, a derivative of the Nation of Islam that teaches a philosophy including knowledge of self, faith in the black man as God, and the division of the hu- man population into categories of awareness.

After joining the Nation of Gods and Earths inRakim began liberally lacing his lyrics with its terminology. Even before one considers his poetics, Rakim distinguishes himself with his delivery and his voice—a rich and resonant baritone.

At the same time, his delivery is not as highly stylized as Eminem or Lil Wayne but instead main- tains a calm, controlled cadence that at times can even come across as deadpan. He brought scien- tific attention to the craft of MCing, employing a host of unusual composi- tional methods over the years that speak to his desire for lyrical distinction. Among them is his habit of writing the last line of a given verse first, then composing the preceding lines with that end in mind.

Wishing to go be- yond the old school strictures of end rhyme, Rakim developed a technique whereby he would split each individual line within a given verse in half, then conclude both the middle section and the end with rhymes.

The result is a densely layered lyric, rich with internal rhymes and sonic echoes. Over time, Rakim has expanded his range of multisyllabic rhymes and slant rhymes. ERIC B. You must be crazy Thought I was a doughnut, you tried to glaze me. Marley Marl synthesized it, I memorize it Eric B. Lighten up. Lyrics of Fury! They de- buted with No More Mr. Nice Guy and followed it with Step in the Arena Moving through a medieval British world to the Coliseum of ancient Rome, the song ends in an arena of another sort, a place we buy tickets to enter to hear rhymes styled as battle.

Three more Gang Starr releases followed in the s. Make it fast so we can be on our way Kick in the rings and everything, okay? T aking his name from the pimp turned novelist Iceberg Slim, Ice-T cut a larger-than-life figure.

The song is an aubade, as it begins at the crack of dawn, and par- takes of the picaresque as it moves through its series of episodes. Each epi- sode is contained in a discrete stanza, but each stanza advances the story. Continued clockin freaks with immense posteriors Rolling in a Blazer with a Louis interior Solid gold, the ride was raw Bust a left turn, was on Crenshaw Sean-E-Sean was the driver, known to give freaks hell Had a beeper going off like a high-school bell Looked in the mirror, what did we see?

Just multiply—colors. What have I got? Give me a break, what world do you live in? Death is my sect—guess my religion. M any rappers are described as cinematic, but the adjective is es- pecially fitting in the case of Kool G Rap. Not every tale is quite so morbid or fear inducing. Al- though it took some time for a full-length album to appear, the Marley Marl—produced Road to the Riches lived up to expectations.

Kool G Rap continues to build on a body of work that has established his place among the most verbally dexterous MCs to emerge in the s. The forefathers of rap were not yet classic, just old, and past success seemed more likely to predict irrelevance than longevity. He also engaged in a long-running feud with LL Cool J, a win-win situation that helped establish the rhyme credentials of his younger opponent while further burnishing his own.

It was one of the first of many rap tales counseling watchfulness over STDs and seems quite tame compared to some that followed as AIDS be- came a scourge. Now I know why her ex-boyfriend Dave Calls her Mrs.

Amateur night at the Apollo? I get paid to rock the nation. On his first two albums, Radio and Big- ger and Defferhis delivery was probably the most athletic of any rapper around. He directed this sonic vigor toward adversaries both ab- stract and concrete and, of course, toward hyping himself. He also shows a romantic side. Cut Creator!

The bells are circulatin the blood in your veins Why are girlies on the tip? We like Cool J! Be on the lookout for a tall light-skinned brother with dimples wearing a black Kangol, sweat suit, gold chain, and sneakers. Last seen on Farmers Boulevard headed east. Alias LL Cool J. Never wearin no Levis, battle me why try?

Get funky! Microphone Fiend - Eric B. & Rakim - Follow The Leader (Cassette what I mean? Girl, listen to me. When I be sittin in my room all alone, staring at the wall, fantasies, they go through my mind, and. And if you wanna give it to me, girl, make yourself seen. I love you. Catch my drift? So funny. Come on down. Like real cool, you know what I mean? I like just going to your front door ringin bells.

And just like, ha, leave. But tonight. LL Cool J Mama said knock you out. Watch me bash this Beat like a skull that you know I had Beef with. Why do you riff with me? How ya like me now? The Ripper will not allow You to get with Mr. Shadowboxin when I heard you on the radio Huuuh! Listen to the way I slaaay your crew Damage uuh! Damage uuh! Farmers What? M C Lyte is an especially versatile MC. This flexibility is mea- sured by how she balances local poetic effects with the bed- rock values of rap braggadocio, all while crafting a variety of compelling stories.

Lyrically, she is a rap icon who sounds and feels as current today as she did fourteen years ago. Arbitrary choices have unintended conse- quences. Dope-style taker! Hit me why dontcha, hit me why dontcha? I walked Into the door, there was a girl on the couch. You chump, you punk, how could you do me wrong? In the wrong place, at the wrong time—it was A drug sale. Was it really time for me to go?

Why, oh why did I need cappuccino? So glad to be given my life back So good to be livin—or was dead better? Or did this cafe even exist? They ush- ered in the rise of West Coast gangster rap. One of their members, Eazy-E, distributed their aesthetically, critically, and commercially successful album Straight Outta Compton on a label he owned. Two other members, Dr. Dre and Ice Cube, would go on to become hip-hop icons.

And their music remains provocative and wildly playable. But it was Straight Outta Compton that had the greatest impact. The al- bum was a virtual blueprint for the genre of gangster rap that would flour- ish in the s. Almost every song felt archetypal. As it stood, the sentiments were appropriately conveyed in language more ex- plicit than most rap fans had heard on record. With a band this volatile, the center predictably could not hold.

Ice Cube left the group in an acrimonious split and took with him not only his verbal virtuosity but also the sense of humor that lurked impishly beneath his lines.

Niggaz4Life still had Dr. They came, they saw, they started a genre—and then NWA disbanded, a short-lived but high-impact group. Dre] Wait a minute, wait a minute. Who the fuck are you talking to?

Do you know who the fuck I am? This bitch is tryin to gank me. Yo, Mr. Dre] Right about now NWA court is in full effect. Judge Dre presiding in the case of NWA versus the police department.

Order, order, order. Ice Cube, take the motherfuckin stand. Do you swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothin but the truth, so help your black ass?

Pull your goddamn ass over right now. Ah, shit. What the fuck you pull me over for? Just sit your ass on the curb and shut the fuck up. Man, fuck this shit. MC Ren, will you please give your testimony to the jury about this fucked-up incident? Yeah, man, what you need? Open up. Oh, shit. Man, what the fuck did I do? What did I do? Man, just shut the fuck up! The verdict: The jury has found you guilty of bein a redneck, white bread, chicken-shit motherfucker.

Microphone Fiend - Eric B. & Rakim - Follow The Leader (Cassette him out of here. I want justice! Get him the fuck out my face. Fuck you, you black motherfucker! Gangsta, Gangsta! Hopin you sophisticated motherfuckers hear what I have to say. Man, what you gonna do now? Hit it! Fuck her! You think I give a damn about a bitch? O f all rap groups, Public Enemy mixed the most serious political en- gagement with many of the greatest innovations in sound and po- etic form for the longest period of time.

He never talked about being the best, and he never criticized another emcee. He never even compared himself to another emcee. In doing so they injected hip-hop with a prophetic strain of politics reminis- cent in content of the spoken-word tradition of artists such as Gil Scott- Heron and the Last Poets. Chuck D often asserts a form-content connection in describing his lyr- ical strategy. You wanna get some? So long now, have a good trip. Yo, yo, who put this thing together, huh? Who I trust?

Now who you trust, man? Aw, Chuck, they out to get us, man. Aw, aw, aw, aw, aw. Yo, we got to dust these boys off! Latifah is adept at various styles, able to throw in a reggae flow, slow it down still further with a love song, deliver a message with the strength of her convictions, or slay a wack MC for daring to get in her way. These pieces constituted an important counterbalance in a rap world that at the time was becoming more brazenly misogynistic.

This call to arms was her biggest single and appeared on her third album, Black Reignwhich, like her aptly named sopho- more release, Nature of a Sistacontinued to develop a place for women in rap. Situations, reality, what a concept!

Nothing ever seems to stay in step So today, here is a message to my sisters and brothers Here are some things I want to cover: A woman strives for a better life, but who the hell cares?

But is it really real? They conquered the mainstream and changed rap by introducing it to a wider listening public, all without relinquishing their hip-hop credentials. Run-DMC brought both orchestrated rhymes and a new sense of style to rap.

They quickly became known for their signature apparel: tracksuits, unlaced Adidas, and fedoras. They brought a similar sense of style to their rhymes. It seems only a small step from there to weaving in elements of rock music. The song was a hit not just on radio but also on the newer video format of MTV, which had heretofore all but ig- nored rap.

In the years since, the group has explored a range of vocations and projects—both together and individually. Run went on to become an or- dained minister and to star in a reality TV show. Jam Master Jay enjoyed a successful career as a producer for other acts until he was murdered in his studio on October 30,a case that has yet to be solved. Run-DMC is not the most lyrically accomplished group in rap history, nor the longest running, but its members will be remembered as the inno- vators who took rap from the old school into its modern beginnings.

Now Dr. S alt-N-Pepa expanded the possibilities for women in rap by making their brash sexuality and assertiveness not simply stylish but mar- ketable. As the first platinum-selling female rappers, they set the standard for an emerging hip-hop feminism. Salt-N-Pepa got their start in Queens in the mids. Beginning with their second album, Spinderella provided production. Together, they challenged the male-dominated industry as well as many of the established conventions for female artists.

The title of their debut album, Hot, Cool, and Viciousspeaks to their reconception of hip-hop gender roles. The song was among the earliest hip-hop songs nominated for a Grammy. By advocating safe sex without denying sexual desire, Salt-N-Pepa responded to the new realities of the age of AIDS without be- ing preachy or compromising their craft. Would you dis him, or would you reply? Tell the truth! J ust as gangsta rap was springing up on the West Coast, from the streets of Philadelphia came an East Coast variation on the theme.

As a rapper, Schoolly has the insouciance of a latter-day Spoonie Gee, cut through with more explicit language and darker stories. Schoolly col- laborated with the director Abel Ferrara on the macabre gangster movie King of New York, providing a soundtrack that matched in its menace the scary cackling of the thuggish Laurence Fishburne and the ghost-faced stare of Christopher Walken in the title role.

Fittingly, though, Schoolly D was less concerned with Five-Percenter ideology than with expressing the rage of someone perpetually put-upon by white society.

Oh yeah, them wild Saturday nights, man. You know what I mean, they wild as shit, man. They wild, man, you know. Yeah, man, let me tell you about another Saturday night experience I had. It was Saturday night and I was feelin kinda funny Gold around my neck, pockets full of money Went to the corner, man, who did I see?

Uh, what is yours? Oh, man, you know what I mean. Them wild Saturday nights, man. You know I got somethin else to say, man. I got somethin to say, man, to everybody. A member of Mr.

It has been said that those who rely on curse words are simply making up for a lack of vocabulary, but lovers of literary invective know otherwise. In fact, there is more than one side to Roxanne. How many runny-nose kids can you have? How many nights can you work on the ave? Are you dizzy—who would ever marry you? S lick Rick is the hip-hop Aesop. Employing a range of voices, moods, and narrative techniques, he defined the terms of rap story- telling.

They began performing at local shows and hip-hop battles. At one such event Rick met Doug E. Fresh, an originator of the human beat box that percussive technique that uses the human voice to fashion rhythm and sound effectswho invited him to join the Get Fresh Crew, which then consisted of Doug, Barry Bee, and Chill Will.

The album is also marked by misogyny. Fresh Okay, party people in the house. You know what? The problem that arise is why on earth did she want me? How am I ever gonna tell her? His slow-tempo flow and melodic, funk- inflected beats made him the indisputable father of Bay Area hip- hop.

His career spans more than twenty years, nearly twenty albums, and scores of songs. With major-label publicity behind Microphone Fiend - Eric B. & Rakim - Follow The Leader (Cassette, his next two albums, Born to Mack and Life Is.

The Blocks - Screwball - Y2K (Vinyl, LP, Album), Postmortem - 1349 - Massive Cauldron Of Chaos (Vinyl, LP, Album), The Son Of America, Scream - Various - The World Of Club Tracks (CD), Solo Tu - Tito Troncoso Chileswing - Tito Troncoso Chileswing (CD, Album), Rock It Billy - Billy Lee Riley - Blue Collar Blues (CD, Album), Cutter - Various - Lunacy Diaries. Volume 1 (File), Harry Mosco - Funkees (For You Specially) (Vinyl, LP, Album), Midnight Train - Marcus D - Revival Of The Fittest (CD, Album), Es Un Pecado = Its A Sin - Pet Shop Boys - Actually (Cassette, Album), Beautiful (Pulser Remix) - Various - The Ultimate Summer Dance Mix (CD), Circle

This volume responds to an unmet need for accurate tran- scriptions, voiced so clearly by the thousands of people who care enough about rap to post lyrics, however imperfect, online. Of course, flawless transcriptions Album) nearly impossible to achieve; undoubtedly small errors remain in even the most scrupulous efforts, ours included. However, read- ers can rest assured that the lyrics included here have been meticulously vetted, sometimes by the artists themselves.

Rap lyrics share with medieval ballads the pat- tern of first being performed before being presented for public consump- tion in written form. Those who wish to transcribe a song face the immediate challenge of comprehension: Can you decipher all the words? Particularly for rap, can you comprehend the slang?

The final matter for transcription is one of form: Where do you break the line? What are the basic structures upon which rap songs are forged? Whenever the flow stops, the line breaks. Another method involves transcribing as one would with musical notation—with the eighth note, quarter note, half note, and whole note.

Both of these methods have a certain intuitive logic, but both go against the method most MCs employ when writing their lyrics to a beat. Most MCs compose their lines with beat and song structure in mind. Each measure or bar in a typical rap song consists of four beats, and a lyric line consists of the words one can deliver in the space of that bar. Therefore, one musical bar is equal to one line of verse.

This description fits the way that rappers themselves most often talk about their lyrics. Preserving this fundamental relationship makes it possible to discern a host of formal qualities in the verse.

It allows us to distinguish between end rhymes and internal rhymes, to appreciate effective enjambment, to note the caesural pauses within lines, and to perceive a host of formal ele- ments that might otherwise escape notice.

When MCs talk among themselves, they often talk about matters of poetic and musical craft—about syllables and bars, varieties of rhyme and rhythmic cadences, breath control and vocal intonation, metaphors and similes.

These and other books like them testify to the attention MCs direct to mat- ters of language and sound, discussions that often get drowned out by the more controversial elements of hip-hop culture.

Reading them reminds us that whatever else rap is, it is also poetic expression. Reading rap will never be the same as listening to it, but it retains an essential value all its own.

Many Hip Hop lyricists have jewels wo- ven deep down in the meanings of certain songs, but the whole duty of Hip Hop is firstly, writing, and secondly, to get the song across, and a lot of times artists are more focused on how to get it across so that the substance, reasoning, and metaphors that have been written into the rhymes get over- looked. For all of its applications, though, the term resonates most loudly in hip-hop.

The old school is always audible when listening to rap. We hear it in direct references and recycled verses, or in glancing lyrical gestures and tendencies of rhyme. No art is likely to survive without assimilating, critiquing, and trans- forming its past.

It advances itself in time and in its range of aesthetic strat- egies with constant reference to what has come before. Rap has a particular genius for handling its own history. To activate this knowledge, one need do only a little digging to discover the original recordings. Through overuse and nostalgia, the term old school can congeal into an abstraction that distances us from the immediacy of the actual music.

The man most often mentioned as the sonic originator of hip-hop is DJ Kool Herc. By he was spinning new sounds—most notably for the future of hip-hop, soulful tracks with powerful instrumental breaks—at Sedgwick Avenue in the Bronx. Around —75 he began playing at a Bronx club called the Twilight Zone and continued his career by headlining shows and par- ties across the city as the burgeoning hip-hop underground took shape around him.

Kool Herc had a great impact on several of the figures who would make the first rap recordings, especially on such foundational DJs as Afrika Bambaataa and Grandmaster Flash. Unlike Bambaataa and Flash, how- ever—both of whom, while cutting their chops as young DJs and group leaders, were associated with a crew of talented MCs—Kool Herc began be- fore the MC had become a well-defined figure in the hip-hop sound.

Herc himself would sometimes voice a few phrases, having been influenced both by the tradition of Jamaican toasting and by the on-air patter of New York radio DJs such as Cousin Brucie. When asked who was the first performer he saw who rapped in the sense that we now know the term, Kool Herc named Kid Creole and Melle Mel. Yet these pioneers acknowledge their early lyrical work as an extension of the Herculoid sound. So we would take that and lengthen it, and say it to the beat.

Like any DJ, the hip-hop DJ mixed together a variety of sounds in a more or less continuous chain. The MCs thus had ample space to fill and an impe- tus to fill it in a way that made musical sense in relation to the sonic environment. This fashioned a dual rhythmic relationship of beat and voice, the fundamental relationship in all rap music.

Names such as Pete DJ Jones and Grandmaster Flowers were known throughout the boroughs, and there was much cross-pollination between the musical lines—Jones played in mid- town Manhattan but also had a following in the Bronx; Flowers was from Brooklyn but was renowned for a sound system that often played Central Park.

None of these men went on to have a substantial recording career, account- ing for about half a dozen singles among them, but they were popular as professional DJs. Cheba and Hollywood played for several years at Clubone of the most profitable Bronx dance clubs of the era, and Holly- wood shared the marquee at the Apollo Theater with such acts as The Spin- ners and Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes. Until fallwhen the first rap songs were released commercially on records, the only way to hear the music, aside from attending a live show, was to listen to a cassette tape recording of a live show.

These tapes were passed around and even sold in a kind of underground art economy. In fact, several years after the release of rap records began inthe live tape was still popular with listeners who wanted to experience the raw event of real-time music being made in front of a crowd.

For some, the very idea of a rap record was inconceivable given the nature of the rap perfor- mance. Such shows had multiple participants and the goal was to last for hours into the night. The Sugarhill Gang were not regarded by most practicing rappers as totally authentic, given that they had not honed their skills in public performance in the parks and the clubs.

Yet their record, which con- tained rhymes that had been used in public by such MCs as Cheba, Holly- wood, and especially Grandmaster Caz of the Cold Crush Brothers, was surprisingly popular with the record-buying public.

Rap would take Album) competition to elaborate and impressive levels. He employs several methods in trying to do so. For in- stance, he connects what he is saying to the music, announcing the record being played like the good DJ he also is.

The rhyming that becomes synonymous with rap is here still rudimen- tary. Cheba has two ways to distribute his rhymes against the four-beat measures or bars.

One way is to have a rhyming couplet in which the two lines of the couplet correspond to two four-beat bars. Two such couplets that Cheba raps are familiar to any fan of hip-hop:. In one extended passage, Cheba connects his couplets not only by the final rhymes, but also by a repetitive structure at the beginning of the bars that further accentuates the couplets and links them in a rhetorical relationship of cause and effect:. Because Cheba be- gins with bar-filling lines that contain between eight and ten syllables in the initial couplets, the effect, when he fills the final two bars with only one syl- lable each, is to slow us down; for although the musical backing has not changed its tempo, the less propulsive and thus variable play of onrushing syllables at the end operates against the regularity of the musical beat.

Because most of the po- etic work in this early rap is being done by the end rhymes, to distribute those rhymes at half the frequency as occurs in a string of couplets is also to alter the lyrical tempo.

Thus, by alternating between the couplets and the ballad style, Cheba gives the crowd some formal and temporal variety de- spite the uniform simplicity of the content. Hollywood shares with Cheba several techniques: self-naming and self-description, the exhortation of the crowd, the intro- duction of a current dance, and the integration of his lyrics with the spe- cific song being played by the DJ. As in the Cheba excerpt, we find in the Hollywood excerpt a few differ- ent patterns of rhyme distribution.

Hollywood at first seems to continue this pattern of an internally rhymed line a that will lead to the abcb pattern; he then re- sists the expectation he has established in order to move with one variation back into a series of couplets:.

By leading us to expect a rhyme scheme that never develops, while string- ing us along with a series of adjectives that move us across one line and into the next, Hollywood gives us the sense of a run-on line, of enjambment, meaning that a line-ending lacks any strong pause or clear stopping point. This model of the rap group was both star-centered the DJ and col- lective the MCs.

That arrangement began to shift somewhat as standout MCs developed within the groups. For the most part, it is true, the various MCs within a group were not easily distinguishable in terms of lyrical con- tent. The biggest shift, however, was the advent of commercially recorded rap in Everything changed once rap made the move to studio record- ings that could then be pressed onto vinyl and widely distributed.

The song became so wildly successful that it was soon fol- lowed by a host of others. The template of these songs only partially followed what had hereto- fore happened during a rap performance. For although many of the re- corded rhymes were the same as their stage-show versions, the figure who before had been central—the DJ—was now relegated to a leader mainly in name.

The DJ was not recorded in his element doing his mix-and-scratch thing. Rather, in-house studio funk bands re- created the extension of a break. Over this the rappers would rap, which, while hardly making the DJ obsolete, did shift attention to the MC. The change also shifted attention to the commercial possibilities of rap. Established independent label owners began to release rap records, while many more new labels sprang up like mushrooms after a rain. Many lived only briefly, while some—like Sugar Hill Records, with its eye-catching candy-cane logo and ever-increasing stable of artists—thrived.

Even major labels such as Mercury and Polydor got into the act. The story of produc- tion and distribution is an important one in understanding the eventual global reach of hip-hop. And, despite its almost decade-long gestation period in the parks and clubs of New York, rap was a new sound indeed for the world at large.

One way to measure the freshness of the music for the record-buying public is by the song titles of the first wave of record releases. Anything that is going to be sold needs to be categorized, and if the music is of a new genre, cat- egorization is all the more imperative. The listener and potential buyer wants to know—or at least, initially, name—what he or she is listening to.

Anyone who was around to listen to rap in the early s will remember the frequent claims that the music was a fad, a gimmick, a cheap trend des- tined to die a quick death. After more than thirty years of studio-recorded history, no reasonable person can hold this opinion; for while three decades is not so long in the great evolutionary scheme of things, it is a run of Methuselah-like persistence in the world of popular music. Still, something of the early anxiety over the seriousness and potential longevity of rap can be seen in the initial prevalence of rap novelty tracks.

There were songs that took their titles from puppets, video games, and cartoon characters such as Alf, E. There were songs that described Roxanne as fat, as a cross-dresser, and as the inspiration for a dance. The early s also saw a profusion of space-based songs. Its edges were sharper and its underlying message was Utopian.

The interstellar conceit also elevated the serious- ness of what is simultaneously one of the most perpetually playful songs in rap. Bambaataa was working with sonic and lyrical tropes that figured Afri- can Americans as alienated and thus as aliens, as people from another planet or galaxy—as had among musicians Sun-Ra before him, as would Outkast and many others after him.

That this theme, and especially its elec- tronic backdrop, spoke to people in a period of rapid technological, computer-based growth is not surprising. Its staying power perhaps has been surprising, as the sonic template Bambaataa crafted has made its mark on styles of music as diverse as house and Miami bass, and in more recent productions by producers such as Pharrell and Timbaland.

Is music made by a so- cially marginalized group necessarily political? Does popular music as a commercial medium tend to be inimical to political critique? Is all social critique political, and does description equal action? Not all songs were without political content, although none at first were as definitive in their message as the words of Brother D. The best-known verses in the song are these classic lines by Melle Mel:. A warning, a description, a meditation—the art was growing in nuance and implication as its poetic power grew and as its formal, rhetorical, and the- matic possibilities became more strongly manifest.

A new kind of music was becoming the nesting ground for a new kind of poetry. Bambaataa, a resident of the South Bronx, is an artist of rich paradoxes: a onetime Black Spade gang member who inspired peace among fans who once were rivals; a bear of a man beloved among his collaborators for his caring ways; a devotee of African American culture and community who opened up that culture to other constituencies; a party-rocking DJ whose taste had pedagogical intent; a streetwise realist who through his eclectic music envisioned Utopia.

Bambaataa began to DJ ineven before he had two turntables and a mixer. When his record was almost finished playing, one DJ would shine a flashlight across to the other, who would then begin to play his cued-up record, and back and forth it went. Like many of his Bronx-based peers, Bambaataa ran with the Black Spades, a powerful gang in a gang-heavy era.

Inspired by a trip to Africa and Europe, by the story of the Zulu warriors who fought the British, and by messages of black power that could be heard on record James Brown, Sly Stone and on the street the Nation of IslamBambaataa essentially became a community organizer.

In he founded the Mighty Zulu Na- tion as a conglomerate of friends, fans, and fellow travelers whose inclina- tions tended not toward intraborough violence but toward an appreciation for music and its thought-provoking, self-sustaining, community-based pleasures.

Biggs, G. The song marked a sonic revolution in hip-hop. The studio funk band was gone, replaced on record by electronic keyboards and the bass-heavy sound of the Roland drum- machine.

The tempo was fast, clocking in at beats per minute. His tendencies as an inventive DJ were part ar- cheological and part alchemical; he would take bits of the past undiscov- ered by his peers and transform them into gold. And you could go back to the talks of Murray the K, Cousin Brucie, and all the other radio stations that was pushing the rap on the air or pushing the rock and roll. So rap was always here. The Cosmic Force, the Cosmic Force.

Just get on the mic and do your own thing. Bambaataa, Bambaataa. Just taste the funk and hit me. Just get on down and hit me. We emphasize to show we got ego Make this your night, just slip it right in by day As the people say, live it up, shucks For work or play, our world is free Be what you be—be.

Adaptable, personable, and good-looking, Blow had crossover appeal before rap really knew what crossover appeal was, paving the way for figures like LL Cool J and Will Smith. More striking are his consistency and his range.

Brakes in a bus, brakes on a car Breaks to make you a superstar Breaks to win and breaks to lose But these here breaks will rock your shoes And these are the breaks Break it up, break it up, break it up. Break down. Much of this can be attributed not only to Brother D and Collective Effort but also to the fact that their indepen- dent label not only welcomed but initiated the project.

DJ Rap It Up! While you party down yelling, shock the house Get down, rock-shock the house The Ku Klux Klan is on the loose Training their kids in machine gun use Obey everything has its place and time We can rock the house, too, as we shock your mind. Gotta agitate, educate, and organize How we gonna make the black nation rise? Agitate, educate, organize [repeat to fade]. A Harlem-based DJ who also rhymed, Eddie Cheba is the kind of often overlooked forefather whose actual contribution is under- remembered because his live sets never translated to record.

He had routines, he had girls— the Cheba Girls—he had little routines, and he did it with a little rhythm, you know. Once again, we gonna have a little fun, so let me hear everybody one time, come on, say.

How you feel? Well, how you feel? How many people know about the Jack Benny? Once again, get ready, girlfriend, we gonna have a little fun at the place to be. Come on, now, let me hear somebody scream. Come on, keep in step. T he Cold Crush Brothers came from the Bronx. Their live shows are legendary in the annals of hip-hop, and many of them were widely circulated on tape. They were not just popular, but also influential—for instance, Run-DMC credits the Cold Crush Brothers with inspiring them to shape their sound, which in turn shaped much rap that followed.

If the setting was a battle, as on the excerpt below from of a show that pitted the Cold Crush Brothers against the Fantastic Five, the four MCs would sometimes rap a series of verses alone, sometimes rap a series to- gether, sometimes trade verses, sometimes rhyme by passing the baton from one to the next as in a relay; they also sang, or would rap in a sing- songy way to the melody of popular hits of the day.

Although remembered more for their work on the stage, they recorded some strong and representative records in the studio.

Maybe it is also a mark of the perception of actual theft. The subject matter is one thing here, the Album) another; the interlocking in- ternal rhymes suggest why the group was attended to by fellow rappers back in the day:.

It was advanced for the time and it still sounds fresh. Throw your hands in the air. Charlie Chase, Charlie Chase, keep the rocket in the pocket. L ike Eddie Cheba, DJ Hollywood was a disco-style DJ who played primarily at clubs with an older and more middle-class clientele than one would associate with early hip-hop. Nevertheless, his in- fluence was extensive because of the rhymes he developed to supplement his sets. Oh shit. Sometimes we get down, mama. Having a good time, we say, how many people out here know about the Macho Man meeting the Patty Duke?

Well, if you know anything about the Macho Man meeting Patty Duke, somebody say. I got the girls in check.

Alright, we want Larry to come over by the door. Larry, you come over by the door. Everybody else, I wanna know, how many people out here in Jamaica know how to do the world-famous Patty Duke dance? If you can Patty Duke, let me hear you say. Just a little bit—clap your hands. Stomp your feet.

Clap your hands. Stomp your feet—come on, Starski. What you say? Right now, once again, to all the people out there dancing to the music, we want you to put your hands together one more time. Come on—just clap your hands, everybody; everybody, clap your hands. His move prompted Sha-Rock—one of the first and best female MCs—to leave the group.

These positive developments were balanced by the unfortunate fact that the shift to studio work left their DJs in the lurch. The change in emphasis led to fissures and the group disbanded. What remains on re- cord, however, is a good representation of the nonstop, almost interminable flow of a multimember group, of interplay of verses among group mem- bers, and of the contribution to early rap of a dope female MC.

Say, I got money and I can jerk. Grandmaster Flash was a DJ prodigy from the South Bronx whose claim to fame in the mids was being the fastest to mix from break to break, a skill he also helped refine by designing his own mixers. Eventually to these three MCs were added Scorpio, a.

Ness, and Rahiem who came from the Funky Four —thus bring- ing the total of the group to a furious five. They played everywhere, amassing a major reputation as live perform- ers. The many tapes of their shows suggest how deserved that reputation was. Given that the center of the group had always been Flash, the record re- vealed the kinds of changes that would quickly occur.

Jeff Chang describes how Flash was relegated to the role of spectator, with a house band per- forming the instrumentals. To the beat that makes you want to freak To the highs that make your nature rise To the sound that makes you want to get down Is a song that makes you want to go on Like hot butter on—say what? The popcorn Females, what you want to do? You say unh, I like it You say unh, I love it So what the fuck of it? One time, two time Three times for your mind Kick off your shoes and relax your feet And dance to the rhythm of the sure shot beat.

Yeah, man —Cowboy! Grandmaster Flash and Furious Five 77 Not again! She got hurt bad When this happen? When this happen? A gang? Naw, man! Look, shut up! You the problem! Get in the car! Get in the godda—I said get in the car! Blow away. Grandmaster Flash and Furious Five 79 [4x] Freeze! White lines Vision dreams of passion Blowin through my mind And all the while I think of you Pipe cries A very strange reaction For us to unwind The more I see the more I do Something like a phenomenon—Baby Tellin your body to come along But white lines.

Sure, whatcha got? Obviously, his physical person is on a stage, in a circle with fellow rappers, or even in his shower while his mind is a few seconds in the future, piecing together phrases informed by data in the present. The rapper is thus in a solid physical state and a fluctuating mental state at the same time; a personified example of the concept of wave-particle duality found in quantum mechanics.

Graffiti Its like three-card Monty, and pick-pocketing, and shoplifting, and, uh, graffiti defacing on public and private walls. Theyre all in the same area of destroying our lifestyle. A number of futuristic modes of production can be found in graffiti, but equally interesting are the connections to postmodernism and surrealism which are more explicitly articulated in graffiti than in rapping or DJing.

Though some may not consider surrealism or postmodernism to be necessarily futurist schools, I contend that since both philosophies have such strong ties to Afrofuturism, for our intents and purposes in this essay it is proper and useful to consider them futuristically inclined. For more information on wave-particle duality and quantum mechanics in general, see David J. The idea of a falling out or detachment from modernitys goals and modes of operation is an idea shared by Afrofuturism, postmodernism, and surrealism.

If the. The Train Just looking at that thing, a black silhouette just sitting there with red blinking lights sticking out.

Its alive! Much like its hip-hop companions rapping and DJing, graffiti grew in occurrence during a period of great urban neglect which colored much of the s and s.

In tandem with the decline of urban quality of life and the setting in of the apocalypse, the appropriation of public spaces for the purpose of making art grew in popularity and spawned a culture which would create both an intensely private and explicitly public form of visual art.

Before discussing the graffiti itself, it would be helpful to consider some of the special characteristics of subway trains and how these would come to be utilized by graffiti artists. Subways are, by some definitions, mechanisms created to facilitate the smooth operation of labor in a socio-economic system where labor is a commodity and where people do not work on the land they own peasant economy or rent feudal economy namely capitalism. Miller himself says of Quoones that he regards his paintings as an attempt at readjusting the distorted values of.

Subways are, in a sense, very ends-oriented mechanisms; they will take you from one place to another in box, which largely travels underground, so that you can work. Subways in New York were meant to be cold, expressionless people movers as shown by the desire of public officials and the transit authority to keep the cars shining white, free of blemishes, and for use by respectable New Yorkers who according to transit authority workers would be cheered up upon being greeted by a solid white, artless steel carriage and who wanted nothing from the trains but to sit inside them and be taken to their jobs.

Living in a world where the urban poor were being written out of the human story and where concrete structures such as the Cross-Bronx Expressway constructed with the explicit intent to make Manhattan a center of economic wealth took precedent over the lives and livelihoods of those who lived in its projected path, artists began sending out messages to worlds which were not considered their own.

Subordinate to the master plan to generate wealth no matter what the cultural costs, the graffiti writers used the only things with. Of course, people use subways and commuter rail services for non-labor related reasons such as visiting friends and family, shopping, or for connection to another mode of transit.

Yet given that many rapid transit systems operate at an annual net loss or yield only a small profit, it can be concluded that the metropolitan areas have a financial incentive to continue funding such projects.

If most people used subways to visit their grandparents, few to no cities would take on an annual debt to ensure this familial connection. But since cities are largely dependent upon a healthy wage-labor economy where people work where they do not live, it is imperative that the government create a way to distribute these productive capital creators from their homes to their places of work. Famed graffiti artist Lee Quiones once said that he actually felt sympathy for subways trains, which he saw as lonely, and felt that his painting of them did not mar them, but rather made them so special.

The challenges to modernity here are relatively clear. Rather than viewing the trains as tools for use in furthering the accumulation of wealth, graffiti artists saw them as expressers of emotion and feeling. The fixed identity of the cold, white, sterile at least in appearance subway cars was replaced with a fluid identity where a car could one day be the expression of hard times in the Bronx, and the next could be a playfully absurdist.

Miller, If we hearken back to chapter two and my comments on Afrofuturism as, among other things, a direct challenge to the Western progress-hermeneutics superstructure, we can see connections emerge between Afrofuturism and train graffiti.

If subways and expressways were constructed for the proliferation of wealth, but this wealth was not privy to an enormous number of mostly non-White people who lived within such paths, where is the rationale that wealth-creation is inherently progress or an end unto itself?

We must also consider the historical devaluation of the merits of labor within many African diasporic traditions and include this in an interpretation of subways where the value of their labor-providing capacities might not be as revered from a Black perspective Kelley, Of course, Latinos and some White ethnics and Asians would be consumed by urban blight as well.

The creation of what I call functionally Black non-Black persons in certain contexts and situations is something bell hooks points to as a result of postmodern conditions which lead to a sense of deep alienation, despair, uncertainty, loss of a sense of grounding, even if it is not informed by shared circumstance Potter, 9. Hooks sees this momentary Blackening of non-Black groups as a potential area of connection and collaboration among many oppressed groups, and may help to explain why graffiti was so multiracial even in its early years.

The Name Its a name. Its just like, Ill give you a name and say, hey, how big can you get this name up? Graffiti artists generally assumed pseudonyms when writing, and quite often these names became the basis for the artworks themselves.

When Samuel Clemens became Mark Twain, he used it as a name under which to publish literature; but when graffiti legend PHASE 2 adopted his name, he used it as an identity in specific, a connection to his Africa ancestors and an objection to his being given an European name at birth and as a material.

From its beginnings in tagging, graffiti developed an obsession with popularizing the name over the physical artist, as we explored in chapter one. Graffiti legend. Miller, 37 unfortunately, no photograph of Mickey Mouse or his injurious hand gesture is pictured in this source. Certainly all art is perceived and received differently when it is brought to a new venue, but that graffiti was consciously created on a surface whose sole function was to move into and through different contexts testifies to the inherent postmodern mechanisms of graffiti and the intents of the artists.

Name fame. Ex out of and potential combine to signify a potential which exists outside of something, in this case, the graffiti writers. Though impossible to know what each piece of art means to each artist, the works that graffiti writers painted on trains meant a great deal to them, perhaps as Zee suggests because it provided them with a potential that present life within the politics of abandonment could not.

It bears noting at this point, though it may seem a bit of a digression when this is in fact a very germane moment to make such a commentthat assuming names is a. Young men and women many of Latino or African descent tempted the New York City police, the unknown caverns of old subway routes, oncoming trains weighing tons upon tons, and the deadly third-rail in order to spray their art onto the sides of trains, knowing full well that the vast majority of people who saw the works would have no idea who made them, nor would such spectators even be able to find out.

Miller, As if not evident from every MC and DJ mentioned thus far, stage-names are almost always taken by artists, but the practice has much more depth than simply providing a relatively plain-named person with a catchier moniker for entertainment purposes so as not to overload the reader with too many extraneous names, I will limit my examples to futuristic artists whom I will be referencing in the next chapter. The change of name coincided with a drastic change in style and subject matter on the record, which was a heavily futurist influenced work containing a relatively consistent storyline taking place in outer-space.

Obviously, the actions of a person are often closely associated with his name, and it is perhaps partly because of this phenomenon that Del tha Funkee Homosapien chose to use a new name on the Deltron album to start with a clean slate. An even more relevant example is that of Kool Keith who boats around a halfdozen aliases. Known as Kool Keith while performing more mainstream-style if now considered old school rap with his first group Ultramagnetic MCs, Keith assumed the name Dr.

Octagon in when he and Dan the Automator released Dr. The album which I will examine later was a bizarre, sexually. There are some notable exceptions in hip-hop of people who use their legal names in their work such as Erick Sermon and Kanye West.

Octagons interplanetary terrorizing of his unfortunate patients. Keith abandoned the name though assumed a few more until when he released The Return of Dr. Octagon and once again utilized the name Dr. Such examples are endless, but suffice it to say that it is very common in hip-hop for artists to take on new names in order to achieve new goals and do new things on a musical level.

An artists name becomes a work of art, is used to express what he has no agency to otherwise express, and is transported to millions of people for free. Yet the artist himself is invisible in this process until he finds a way if he wants to at all to make his physical voice heard and face seen. It is the name which becomes the subject. Wild Style Its not words, its not a name anymore. Its more of a living thing that you have created -Lee Quiones However for the sake of practicality, I will try to explain a stylistic element known as Wild Style and draw from it its postmodern and surrealist tendencies.

Aliases and naming in hip-hop will be fleshed out and examined as they pertain to hip-hop futurism in chapter four.

Just as names become subjects in graffiti, scripts become art in a calligraphic fashion. Artists constantly innovated script writing within the graffiti movement, but as graffiti culture progressed into the s, certain scripts began moving from an embellished Roman alphabet to a more cryptic, camouflaged writing form.

As personal computers and the near monopolization of letter-shape by software publishers lurked at the gates of society in the early s, ready to explode across the world in popularity, a renaissance of calligraphy was taking place in the world of graffiti.

But if graffiti was all about name fame and the transmission of messages to the outside world through art, what sense did it make to start writing in Wild Style? Certainly, each artist had his own reasons: personal fulfillment in creating art, wanting to make a political. The post-apocalyptic Bronx and other depressed areas of New York to which I have referred a number of times began producing yet another response to modernity.

The concept of the original artist had been overruled by the hip-hop DJ, music as an analog wave had experienced the digital interference of the rapper, and now the very foundation of Western intellectual life the letter had been appropriated and broken down by graffiti artists.

Let me entertain the most elementary example of postmodern rhetoric I first encountered some years ago. Say you have a large, tall cup made of soft clay, but still hard enough to hold water. Now pry this clay cup open slightly your cup is now slightly wider and shorter. Continue this process over and over again.

Eventually you will find your cup to be stout, wide, and more resembling a bowl. Continue the process even further and your piece of clay will soon become a plate. The question is: at what point did your cup become a bowl and your bowl a plate?

How would you determine such a point? The postmodern thinker would say that there is no point that the clay can be called whatever one wants and its definition will change depending on setting and context. This rudimentary postmodern thinking can easily be applied to graffiti, firstly because the art form rendered the distinctions between names, writing, and visual art useless by making all three interdependent upon each other, and secondly because the actual letters had been so manipulated by the writers that distinguishing between a letter which is highly utilitarian and an embellishment which is mainly aesthetic became difficult and words became totally contextual.

Perhaps a piece of Wild Style graffiti explicitly said something, but it would be equally likely that a woman Messages could now be sent from one graffiti artist to another, passing through potentially millions of lines of sight, without anyone else save for a relative thimble-full of other graffiti writers understanding it or even recognizing it as a series of letters.

The utilitarian trains had begun serving a completely non-productive artistic and expressive purpose while the Roman script, being increasingly standardized and codified in style and function with the increased prevalence of word processors and computers, became perverted beyond recognition for the vast majority of those in the mainstream, modern world. A cultural civilization made up of rapping, DJing, and graffiti, which was unintelligible and beyond the intellectual reach of the society which owned all of the appropriated equipment used to construct it, existed parallel to normative civilization.

Perhaps not the most visible, but still the most salient example of this comes from the practice of naming in graffiti. The dreamt, invented, extracorpus subject i. But the more optical surrealism comes from the canvasses most often used in graffiti and the manipulation of the Roman script.

One of the most characteristic and special aspects of graffiti is its tradition of doing art where art is not to be done: overpasses, abandoned buildings, trains, and other public edifices.

Graffiti, with its often exotic colors and mesmerizing shapes, is injected into the rational, commercial world in which most people live their lives devoid of dreaming.

Graffiti, owing to its projection onto areas typically intended to be sterile by their creators, forcefully confronts society with the dreams of artists. I hope that by now I have made the postmodern and surreal natures of graffiti relatively visible to the reader, though I admit that the futurist elements may still remain a bit unclear. Since the adoption of pseudonyms often did not position itself in some future time period, it may be difficult to detect the futuristic aspects of graffiti.

However, if one considers what I wrote in chapter two about Paul Gilroys assertion that dreaming about the future was a critical part of Black culture for, most likely, the bulk of Black history, connections can easily be seen running between this early form of Afrofuturism and. Therefore, delineation between Afrofuturism and graffiti can be seen if one examines the production-aesthetics of both rather than merely the explicit content.

Hip-hop should not be seen solely as a futuristic cultural movement or art form, nor should any futurism found there within be heralded as the most important or influential aspect of the culture. Futurism is but one lens through which to view hip-hop; however I believe that peering through such a lens provides insight into new understandings of where Afrofuturism is going or where it has gone theoretically and how hip-hop may be able to help us consider the future in our current social climates.

In the next chapter I wish to examine Afrofuturist occurrences in hip-hop, futuristic hip-hop works by mainly Black artists which are quite unlike typical Afrofuturist aesthetics, and To avoid a gross misunderstanding of what I mean by Black history, I urge the reader to go back to the preface and examine my working definition of Black which I employ in this context.

While the South Bronx and other urban areas in the United States was leveled and left to rot, slavery consisted of an over-presence of dominant Whites in the lives of Blacks. Harm was actively inflicted as a primary directive in the plantation context in order to lead to something else, namely, more crop production or sexual access to slave women whereas the harm in the post-apocalyptic South Bronx was the fallout from dominant primarily Whites who were actively pursuing the reorganization of urban life.

In the hell scenario, the Black person is a focus. In the apocalyptic scenario, she is a byproduct. As I will show in the coming two chapters, the wider hip-hop culture disagrees with classic Afrofuturism on a number of fronts.

KRS-Ones rhetorical question posed above was in reference to his belief that persons of African descent who were born outside of the African continent are still African not generic Americans, not Afro-Europeans, but Africans. However many artists do not express any particular sentiment of solidarity with Africa or Black people as a whole and still others explicitly state that their personal ancestries play no role in the creation of their works.

All of these viewpoints and opinions on identity are found within the category of hip-hop artists who also cross-reference as futurists, which creates for the appearance that there is no significant commonality in their interpretations of identity amongst these artists or that their ideas on identity share a common theme. I argue, however, that despite their differences in how they perceive their individual identities, futuristic hip-hop artists share common traits as concerns how they go about constructing their identities.

I argue that this commonality comes from the historical intersection of postmodernism, surrealism, hip-hop, and a realization of what Paul Gilroy has called the black Atlantic and is central to the concept of what I call hip-hop futurism. Firstly, I will summarize the ideas of identity-in-the-future held by some of the most well known futurist hip-hop artists.

I will then argue that, although their conclusions on identity are very different, their processes and tools of constructing identity all share very similar means. These means will come to signify the most defining characteristics of hip-hop futurism.

Afrika Bambaataa From a distant solar system many, many galaxies away, we are the force of another creation. A new musical revelation. Afrika Bambaataa is one of the founders of hip-hop culture and serves excellently to combat any idea that hip-hop was just about disco parties and carefree fun coming out of youth culture in New York. Aside from producing some of the most renowned rap songs in history, Bam as he is often called began one of the most important spiritual and social movements in the hip-hop world before he ever stepped into a studio: The Zulu Nation.

The Zulu Nation is decidedly future-oriented and concerns itself deeply with encounters with alien life and harkening back to a more pristine past which has been, allegedly, corrupted by White supremacists. As a youth, Bam was heavily involved in Bronx gang culture; not due to any inclination toward violence, but because being on ones own was unsafe in the South Bronx in the s and s.

Bams gang, the Black Spades, had existed long enough to see the turf wars and feuds among rival cliques exacerbate the effects of poverty and abandonment: social dysfunction, injuries, and premature death.

Seeing that gang culture was eating itself alive, Bam became active in forming peace treaties among rivals and creating a higher consciousness among many members to see beyond their concrete prison. The Zulu Nation is not, contrary to what preconceptions its name may lend, exclusively African-American.

Though it acquired its name after Bambaataa saw the This creed professes an overall belief in one supreme god who goes by various names such as God, Jah, Amen Ra, Allah, etc, but who is frequently referenced as The Source by the Zulu Nationin one truth discernable through reading and mathematics, and that history and the holy texts mainly the Hebrew and Christian Bibles have been corrupted by believers of White supremacy in order to credit all human achievement to White people.

The vinyl version of this album contains the exclusive bonus track: "Junkyard Priest" featuring Milky Burgess on slide guitar.

This six-track, all-analogue affair is the follow up to 's 'Time To Die'. Originally released on Island Records inAnother Green World is the perfect bridge between Brian Eno's s pop life and his early experiments with Ambient music. It is a conceptual work intended as a soundtrack for imaginary films, although many of the pieces had already appeared in actual films. M ERIC B. THE R The sample-friendly opus thats the inspiration for hip-hop, house and post punk.

Music that falls outside of the no wave, new wave and post punk library, its for the dance floor but its not funk, theres no horns, no driving organ; its the opposite of Sly And The Family Stone but no less cool and no less groovy. A lasting document of their unique brand of minimal funk that would influence subsequent post-punk, hip-hop, and dance music acts. Stripped down to the most basic of drumbeats and rudimentary bass lines, Come Away confirms the notion that the real rhythm is what happens between the beats.

DANCE SOLAR Buzzcocks-style great rock album. LAUFT Crack-Up comes six years after the release of Helplessness Blues and nearly a decade since the band's self-titled debut. In addition, the band has announced new tour dates, including their first North American shows since October All eleven of the songs on Crack-Up were written by Robin Pecknold. The album was co-produced by Pecknold and Skyler Skjelset, his longtime bandmate, collaborator, and childhood friend.

Fleet Foxes is Robin Pecknold vocals, multi-instrumentalistSkyler Skjelset multi-instrumentalist, vocalsCasey Wescott multi-instrumentalist, vocalsChristian Wargo multi-instrumentalist, vocalsand Morgan Henderson multi-instrumentalist. Gatefold sleeve.

LIFE FLOAT Five musicians took to the stage, launched into a song called Inhaler, and blew the roof off. For the 5,plus people who were lucky enough to be present that evening, the experience was more like a mass epiphany at a revivalist meeting than a gig. Foals whipped up a frenzy and sent it hurtling towards the audience, who gave it a shake and sent it hurtling right back.

Two hours later, we staggered, reeling, out into the night. This was more than music. This was alchemy. EXITS Excellent, well creafted tracks. Include download code with bonus tracks. TREES RIO DOLL BIG ME DOA HELL STILL RAZOR It became Aretha's 2nd Gold LP and remained on the charts for over a year. GRIEF Despite the fact that Ian, Joe, and Brendan had been playing together for nearly a year, it was still early days for the band. Guy had only been a full member of Fugazi for a few months and only sang lead on one song "Break In".

It would be nearly another year before he would start playing guitar with the band. At that time, the studio was still located in the basement of engineer Don Zientara's family house. Joey Picuri aka Joey Pwho would later become one of Fugazi's longtime sound engineers, joined the band for the initial tracking.

The sessions only lasted a couple of days, but tour dates and indecision about the tape would delay the final mix for another two months. Though the band was at first pleased with the results, it soon became clear that this tape would remain a demo as new songs were being written and the older songs were evolving and changing shape while the band was out on tour.

It was decided that the session would be passed out free as cassette copies, with the band actively encouraging people to share the recording. In the spring, Fugazi went out on its first U. The only song from the demo session that was formally released was "In Defense of Humans", which appeared on the State of the Union compilation in Now, some 26 years later, Dischord is releasing the entire first demo including the one song "Turn Off Your Guns" that wasn't included on the original cassette.

SONG 1 JOE 1. This year the band celebrates their 35th anniversary and are embarking on a massive North American tour where they will be playing this album in it's entirety. FREAK CATCH 23 The New Jersey-based band's third long player reveals a remarkably powerful rock 'n' roll outfit honed by two years of nearly non-stop touring. Songs like 'Bring It On', 'Orphans' and the rousing title track bristle and burn with the spirit of soul, the energy of punk, and the artistic ambition of any hall of famer you'd care to name.

The band began getting together for writing sessions at their longtime friend Kyle Roggendorf's basement in Parlin, NJ. BOXER You're The Man features all of Gaye's solo and non-soundtrack recordings fromwith most of the album's tracks making their vinyl release debuts. Over the years, songs from You're The Man have been included on several CD releases but 15 of the album's 17 tracks have not been released on vinyl until now.

Upon its initial release, Liquid Swords received critical acclaim for its complex lyricism and hypnotic musical style. Over the years, its recognition has grown, with a number of famous publishers proclaiming it as one of the greatest hip hop albums of all time.

Continuing with its Respect The Classics campaign, UMe will be reissuing the classic back on vinyl for its 20th anniversary. GOLD The first LP is a reissue of the original album. The second LP offers previously uinissued recordings, with a raw sound and including an alternate take of 'House Of Glass'. The second LP has 9 never before heard tracks that were from their original recording sessions, plus an alternate version of the single 'House of Glass'.

Both LP's stand out as two different records. TRANZ IDAHO By the age of 24, Ariana Grande delivered three platinum-selling albums in addition to nabbing four Grammy Award nominations and landing eight hits in the Top 10 on the Billboard Hot chart. I TRY A WEA CHUMP SHE Higher priced reissue.

Visions finds Boucher mining not just the clean brightness of Aphex Twin-like atmospherics, but also the immediacy of straight up mall-pop like Stacey Q's "Two of Hearts. Pitchfork has given the release an 8. EIGHT SKIN A collection of the finer moments from The Growlers - a band of beach bums conjuring psychedelic musical concoctions from Sea Dreams studio in their hometown of Dana Point.

The Growlers have been building a loyal following for the past two years by performing throughout Southern California and selling hand screened and burned CD-R's. Over the course of one full length and eight EPs they have honed their songwriting and recording skills. The best of the best are here, so Are You In Or Out?

Sunburned and salty, that term perfectly describes their distinctive melding of reverb heavy surf guitar and Bakersfield-style honky tonk with '80s post-punk. This is especially true of Chinese Fountain, The Growlers' fifth full-length set to be released on September 23rd via Everloving Records. Everloving Records asked for a tour EP to freshen up their fall dates, and the band returned an entire album's worth of material! Their songwriting is in top form, and this lo- fi garage band delivers some seriously catchy tunes.

ROW Features a brilliant performance recorded live in Italy in that finds the Gun Club on fire. Special green viyl with printed sleeve. Limited to 1, worldwide. Vinyl version includes digital download. LYD DINO The album was recorded last year in residency at London's Somerset House.

The exhibition, entitled 'Recording in Progress' saw Harvey, her band, producers Flood and John Parish, and engineers working within a purpose-built recording studio behind one-way glass, observed throughout by public audiences. DRIVE GHOST ASHES Includes detailed liner notes written by Rudi Protrudi of the Fuzztones as he recounts the dramatic turn of events that made this recording happen! Includes 5 additional bonus tracks of live Fuzztones performances!

But beneath all of that, Vol. In the lyrics, singer Jake Duzsik confronts death, isolation and hopelessness with an uncommon candor and intimacy. Album closer "Decimation" is the most radical move in the band's catalog to date: a gorgeous guitar ballad, a plea for purpose and meaning in a time that makes both feel impossible.

NC FIRE All but two of these studio recordings were made during a fertile period between January and Jimi's mastery and use of the studio as a proving ground for new songs resulted in a growing collection of extraordinary material.

This 2xLP collects 20 songs spanning his career from his first recordings with the Jimi Hendrix Experience in to his last with Billy Cox and Mitch Mitchell in It is the first comprehensive collection of Hendrix's songs overseen by Experience Hendrix, a family company that took over management of his recording legacy in Fifteen songs with the Experience are included and five with Hendrix's later groups often referred to as Gypsy Suns and Rainbows and the Cry of Love touring band.

ANGEL And while these autumnal sides bear some of the frayed vocal moments often heard on Holiday's '50s Verve sides, the majority here still ranks with her best material. NOT U SO SHE This classic LP collects some of his finest singles fromraw and powerful stuff that is as important as any from Hooker's entire career. Often featuring just Hooker and his guitar, or with a small backing combo, these tracks are sparse and deep, as real as the blues ever were. Produced by Segarra and engineered by Andrija Tokic Alabama ShakesSmall Town Heroes features twelve new, original songs all written or cowritten by Segarra, with support from a vivid cast of Crescent City musicians.

Now reissued on black vinyl. JUNE GREAT ZERO ONLY STUCK GLASS GABBY NYC PDA WAVES MASH U-LOVE Conceived as a "letter" to her son, Motor City is packaged in a limited-edition mailing envelope, complete with a handwritten message from Ma Dukes to J Dilla inside.

BAD BIG SLEEP WANT Their sophomore album, Violent By Design, has sold over 85, copies and is regarded by many as one of the best independent hip-hop albums ever recorded. Babygrande Records is proud to present The Psycho-Social LP which is the cult classic prequel to Violent by Design.

Described by the Source Magazine as "ahead of it's time" and by CMJ as "A must own for anyone who cares about hiphop culture," The Psycho-Social was originally released only in limited pressings on vinyl That is until now Inprior to obtaining national distribution, Babygrande released the CD version to independent retailers nationwide and scanned over 40, copies.

Thanks to digital remastering, listeners can obtain the album Jedi Mind Tricks originally released inexactly as the artist intended. An out-of-print gem for the past several years, this vinyl version of Jedi's breakthrough album will thrill die-hard enthusiasts and collectors alike, while allowing Jedi's rapidly expanding fan base to discover this definitive version of the underground classic.

Double LP in gatefold sleeve. CRUSH In the process, they sacrificed the immediacy of the previous record, but they gained an epic and weighty feel. WORK KILL BELLE Features the new song "Just a Little Bit," which was produced by Jones and features her on vocals, piano, and organ along with Brian Blade on drums. UH OH Limited domestically priced version. BOY HOWL Finally, the cover photo of Janis smiling in a sunny park is as poignant a shot of her as exists.

The album is considered the band's commercial breakthrough, and sold in excess of 5 million units worldwide and has been certified double platinum in the United States of America as well as platinum in Canada. The album includes the hit single "You've Got Another Thing Comin'", which became one of the band's signature songs and a perennial radio favorite.

Reissued on gram vinyl. FEVER Packaged in a gatefold, textured cloth sleeve. Includes an obi strip, inner sleeve and a folded, 6-panel, double-side poster. Includes a download code.

I WISH The album features all of the band's classic tracks, plus two studio tracks released only on this format 'Shot At The Night', 'Just Another Girl'and one extra bonus track never before released on vinyl 'Be Still'. The album features the singles 'Shadowplay' and 'Tranquilize feat.

Lou Reed '. Psychedelic lo-fi garage rock. ELBOW NEIN Flying Microtonal Banana is King Gizzard's first-ever experience in microtonal tuning, which features intervals smaller than a semitone and not found in customary Western tuning octaves.

EMPTY MOTU is a face-melting musical assault concerned with the downfall of man, the death of the planet, the murder of the whole goddamn universe. It turns out, though, that once the doors open, it never closes. That's because the Melbourne septet has ingeniously crafted what may be the worlds first infinitely looping LP. Each of the nine, complex, blistering tracks on Nonagon Infinity seamlessly flows into the next, with the final song linking straight back into the top of the opener like a sonic mobius strip.

It's exactly the kind of ambitious vision that prompted Rolling Stone to dub the band "one of the most compelling collectives of art-rock experimentalists in recent years. BEAT Originally limited to copies. After 's Happy Birthday and playing guitar in Hunx and His Punx inThomas seems to have perfected his garage rock pop with this self titled LP.

Coming off like a cross between T. This record combined with his work with J. Mascis in Witch proves that Thomas is an American treasure that will be serving up timeless rock for a long time to come. A wistful piano ballad at its core, the song wildly benefits from Thomas' romantic croon and the climax that bookends it. It's actually kind of difficult to imagine this as the kind of song King Tuff had in him. Through all the hits and misses artists go through while expanding their songwriting breadth, surprises this satisfying are why artists step out of their comfort zone in the first place.

Released for the first time in the US. LP Classic Rock. Tracking most of the album live in shared quarters, La Luz chose to leave in any happy accidents and spur-of-the-moment flourishes that occurred while recording. Cleveland's newly fuzzed-up guitar solos-which now incorporated the influence of Japanese Eleki players in addition to the twang of American surf and country-were juxtaposed against the group's most angelic four-part harmonies to date. ALIEN 8 TODAY CHOKE MOTHS My Life Lil Scrappy.

Chosen Trippie Redd. Wir waren mal Stars TorchToni-L. Arm's Reach Sinnerpiece. Gregory Ganishka Manny Mercury. Bryan Martinez Obeyar. Jordan Baywood Ryy. Discuss these cide Lyrics with the community: 0 Comments. Notify me of new comments via email. Bezzle PM - 23 October, just came across another one of my faves ill puke eat it and freak you battle im too weeded to speak too the only key that i see to defeat you would be for me to remove 2 adidas and beat you and force feed you with both and on each feet is a cleat shoe ill lift you off your feat so fast with a round house youll think i pulled the fuckin ground out from underneath you bitch i aint no fuckin G im a cannibal i aint tryna shoot you im tryna chop you into pieces and eat you wrap you in rope and plastic stab you with broken glass and have you with open gashes strapped to a soakin mattress coke and acid black magic Album) and daggers fuck the planet til it spins on a broken axis im so bannanas im showin up to your open casket to fill it fill of explosive gasses and close it back with a lit match in it while i just sit back and hope it catches blow you to fragments laugh and smoke the ashes eminem.

Halfrikan AM - 24 October, Quote:. Chrisjin PM - 24 October, Bass! Death row what a brother knows Once again, back is the incredible The rhyme animal The incredible D. Public Enemy number one Five-o said freeze! But its the wax that the Terminator x spun Now they got me in a cell cause my records they sell cause a brother like me said well Farrakhans a prophet and I think you ought to listen to What he can say to you, what you ought to do Follow for now, power to the people say, Make a miracle.

DJ Val-BKNY AM - 1 November, I said a hip hop the hippie the hippie to the hip hip hop, a you dont stop the rock it to the bang bang boogie say up jumped the boogie to the rhythm of the boogie, the beat. Your party is bogus, Yo it ain't legit You better put on the hammer, And you will be rewarded My beat is ever Microphone Fiend - Eric B. & Rakim - Follow The Leader (Cassette, And you know I get it started Get it started!

DJ Val-BKNY AM - 1 November, ce ice baby x2 All right stop collaborate and listen Ice is back with my brand new invention Something grabs a hold of me tightly Flow like a harpoon daily and nightly Will it ever stop yo I don't know Turn off the lights and I'll glow To the extreme I rock a mic like a vandal Light up a stage and wax a chump like a candle Dance go rush to the speaker that booms I'm killing your brain like a poisonous mushroom Deadly when I play a dope melody Anything less than the best is a felony Love it or leave it you better gain weight You better hit bull's eye the kid don't play If there was a problem yo I'll solve it Check out the hook while my DJ revolves it.

Culprit PM - 1 November, "Hayatatatacha! But you got me for arguments sake on the album sales tip, but shit, even Vanilla Ice did what; 2mill copies too. Quality not quanity! Hip Hop Hip Hop. Slam it down, tell 'em adios Another round of beers before we go upstairs And watch a fuzzy TV on some of the oldest chairs Relax, take a bath and get nice and clean Come out just in time for dinner, you know rice and beans A little chicken, maybe tostones, it's up to Ma She might be tired keepin this house all up to par Sometimes I look out the window and see some nice wheels I got a thing for rims, they give me slight chills Round here you get killed over a ice-grill Guns pop but the O.

Scarface - on Minda of a Luntic I sit alone in my four-cornered room starin at candles Dreamin of the people I've dismantled I close my eyes and in the circle Appears the images of sons of bitches that I murdered Flashbacks of bodies bein fucked up Once I attack, I'm like a pit on a rage that's goin for guts Boys used to die when I'm full fo that fry I be ebbin when I'm high So I say 'fuck' and just let bullets fly Like I said before, scarface is my identity A homicidal maniac with sucidal tendencies I'm on the violent tip, so yo, get a grip And bitch, come equipped, ain't takin no shit Cause here comes a lunatic or Bushwick Bill on Gangsta of Love Ok cathy That hoe was hot.

The first peace of pussy that I ever got! She fucked me till I was coming Put my nuts in her mouth And started humming I said shit comense the checking She started scratching my dill-bag And said hold up a second. Turned me over on my back gold.

Opened up my butt cheecks And started licking out my asshole That's why I guess that I'm the gangster And oh kathleen johnson sweetheart I'd like to thank you Little hoes out there are getting stuck, By niggas like me and we really don't give a fuck!

Big-ass titties are the sexy switch Whatever you get, you deserved it bitch! Even their love jams were sick Check out Action Scarface on Quickie Shit, tired as. Need some pussy badder than a motherfucker. See if this bitch is home. Dialing Ringing Girl - Hello? Scarface - Hello darlin' how you feelin'? It's Sax. Girl - Fine, how are you? Scarface - Ahh, just maxin' Girl - Been thinking of you.

Scarface -Yeah? Well let's get together. Girl - Okay. Scarface - Let me take me a shit, and I'ma meet 'cha at Oh yo, bring a friend, I gotta buddy wit me.

Girl - Ain't got no friend. Scarface - What?! Girl - Just come and get me. Scarface - I guess you know what's up.

Girl - Yeah I know what's up. Scarface - I ain't down for a love affair, I just wanna fuck. Girl - Better come get me. Scarface - Yo, don't bullshit me, she thinks I wanna long one, but I just want a Quickie. Knocked on her window, didn't wanna wake her parents. Came to the door and the bitch was just starin' Scarface - Come on girl. Yo what the fuck is up? Girl - Why you rushing? Scarface - You rollin' with a nigga bitch or what? Walked out lookin' kinda sexy, jumped in the vehicle, and you know what happened next D.

Took her about an hour to get hot, but once I got her started it was hard to make her stop. She started making noises, and then the heavy breathing, I started suckin' the tits, and rubbin' the pussy. Easy Ha ha ha, yeah. But anyway. She was more like beggin', and pleadin' for the fuckin', unzipped my trousers, and then started suckin'. Had me sayin' shit, I grabbed her by the sweater, she wanna lick my booty, I guess I better let her. Once I came I didn't want the bitch to kiss me, she thought I wanted a long one but I only wanted a Quickie.

Ha ha ha ha ha ha, Word. Drove her back home, she was lookin' kind of frantic. I gave the bitch some dick, I couldn't understand it. Scarface - Ay yo, what's the problem?

Girl - I didn't even cum, I shoulda stayed home. Scarface - Yeah, but I'da still got me some. Pull it together, get your shit and go. She looked me in my eyes, shook her head and said NO. She'd of killed me if I didn't fuck her right, so I got on that ass and fucked the pussy all night.

She was cumming hectic two nuts at a time, it really didn't mater, cuz man, this bitch was fine. She was slippin' off the seat so I caught her, The girl had the looks that made me wanna fuck her harder, grabbed me by my head, she was moanin' and prayin', opened up some more, and fucked her in the ass. The bitch was gettin' married, but all that shit was fine, I gave the girl a fuckin' that would last a life time.

Oooooh, when I get home, my girl is gonna get me, it turned into a long one but I only wanted a Quickie. But i dont think he writes his own shit J0be AM - 8 November, Fresh Prince: "when a couple of guys, they were up to no good, started making trouble in my neighbourhood. I got in one little fight and my mom got scared, she said your moving with your aunte and uncle in bel-air " :.

That's fukkin terrible. And I see why hip hop is all fukked up. No worldplay, no metaphors or similies, no complexities what so ever. RIP hip hop Who you think you talkin to - you think we slippin? Yo Brat, stick the clip in, these niggaz is trippin Bustin shots like pimpin pimpin hit you in your hip and hip and take your Bills like Clinton Clinton nigga I ain't bullshittin You must be lost - thinkin Jersey niggaz is soft I should whip out on your niggaz - make you take your rings off Now take your fuckin jeans off, for thinkin that we soft Before I squeeze off, make you nigga ease off Cause me gettin burnt or hurt, won't be tolerate Funk Bizzy put a foot to your ass, you're constipated - what?

Maybe I should lick her with my nine millime Joell Ortiz was my other choice on the Slaughterhouse cut "Hip-Hop prayed and brought Pun right back" Dre's a damn fool for letting this dude go. Sickest Verse not Sickest Short Story Culprit PM - 10 November, Quote:. Watch www. Winter Warz. Im staten Islands best son fuck what ya herd. I have nightmares. Bezzle PM - 13 November, Quote:. Meth Movin on your left, aah! And set it off, get it off, let it off like a gat I wanna break full, cock me back Small change, they puttin shame in the game I take aim and blow that nigga out the frame And like Fame!!

LMFAO wackest ish ever. Dj Corleone AM - 18 November, im not sayin im number oh im sorry i lied im number 1,2,3,4, and 5. Caramac PM - 20 November, Quote:. G-L0GIX AM - 23 November, Digable Planets We like the breeze flow straight out of our lids Them they got moved by these hard rock Brooklyn kids Us flow a rush when the DJ's boomin classics You dig the crew on the fattest hip hop records He touch the kinks and sinks into the sounds She frequents the fatter joints called undergrounds Our funk zooms like you hit the Mary Jane They flock to booms man boogie had to change Who freaks the clips with mad amount percussion Where kinky hair goes to unthought-of dimensions Why's it so fly cause hip hop kept some drama When Butterfly rocked his light blue-suede Pumas What by the cut we push it off the corner How was the buzz entire hip hop era?

Was fresh and fat since they started sayin audi Cause funks made fat from right beneath my hoodie The puba of the styles like miles and shit Like sixties funky worms with waves and perms Just sendin chunky rhythms right down ya block We be to rap what key be to lock The 1st one is by Rakim, "Critics and biters don't know where my source of light is, I still leave authors and writers with arthirits".

The 2nd is by Kool G Rap, "I got rappers hangin off my 2 nuts like they was put there my the members of the klu klux". RonDu PM - 15 December, The Ripper, the master, the overlordian' Playing MC's like a old accordion I get the inspiration from unnecessary station Them sayin I was vacationin' You can't quote with your weaker throat Tryin to sneak a peek at how I freak the notes Major MC's become minor B-flats So retire the mic, get your chains and your bats Here's your chance to advance, get in your stance I shoot the holster off your cowboy pants Pure entertainment, tonight's your arraignment You're guilty - face down on the pavement!

No holds barred, it's time to get scarred You and your squad better praise the real God The undertaker, droppin' thunder on fakers When it comes to lyrics I'm as freaky as Seka So lay the mic down slow and careful Cause mine is fully loaded and I got another handful A clip to slip in and start rippin' Divin' and dippin' and givin punks a whippin' aww shit Just in case you wanna go a few rounds or so I'm down so that you clowns'll know Me gettin burnt or hurt won't be tolerated I got rhymes up the huh forget it I'm constipated L!

Ladies Love him Driver PM - 18 December, You take 7 mcs, and you put them in a line You take 7 more mcs that think they can rhyme Finish it. He accidentally said something really cool.

Charlie Byrd - Charlie Byrd (Vinyl, LP), Jole Bion - Herb Remington, Bob White (6), Eddie Nation - Cotton Eyed Joe & Other Texas Dance Ha, Read My Mind - Various - The Box Hits Volume 2 - 40 Massive Hits Of The Year (CD), The Breezes Blow - Jimmy & The Rackets - Original Oldies Vol.2 (Vinyl, LP), Watchdog - Frankie Ford - Lets Take A Sea Cruise (Vinyl, LP, Album), Pons (Dobre & Jamez Mix) - Various - DJs Take Control - Volume 3 (CD), Wait It Out, (Ohne Bezeichnung/Without Indications/Sans Indication) - Johann Sebastian Bach, Neues Bachisches Col, Scoops-Carrys-Merry - Earl Hines And His Orchestra - The Original Sounds of the Swing Era Vol. 2 (Vi, Bordsteinfressen Für Zecken - Orgi 69* & Bass Sultan Hengzt - Berlin Bleibt Hart (CD, Album), Gizzada Remix - Merciless - Gizzada Remix (Vinyl), He Is The Boy, Set My Soul On Fire - Eddie Floyd - Set My Soul On Fire (Vinyl), If You Dont Give Me What I Want - Various - Im A Good Woman 2 (Funk Classics From Sassy Soul Sisters, With You - Linkin Park - Greatest Hits (CD)

8 thoughts on “Microphone Fiend - Eric B. & Rakim - Follow The Leader (Cassette, Album)

  1. Eric B. & Rakim- Follow The Leader (New/Sealed). $ Classic sophomore album from this Long Island duo. Features Microphone Fiend, No Competion, The R, Just A Beat, and the monster title track. Essential Hip blueskyservices.biz: Turntable City.

  2. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Cassette release of "Follow The Leader" on Discogs.

  3. Jan 01,  · The way that drug addicts feel about drugs, that’s how Rakim feels about rapping. And extended metaphors. This was the second single released from Follow the .

  4. Original version appears on the UNI LP, UNI-3, "Follow The Leader". Published by SBK Blackwood Music Inc. / Eric B. & Rakim Music Inc. (P)(C) UNI Records, Inc.

  5. Check out Microphone Fiend by Eric B. & Rakim on Amazon Music. Stream ad-free or purchase CD's and MP3s now on blueskyservices.biz(26).

  6. Eric B. & RakimMicrophone Fiend. Follow the Leader. MCA Sample appears at (and throughout) jump. Download this Track. Buy on Vinyl/CD. Producer: Eric B. & Rakim.

  7. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the CD release of "The Microphone Fiend" on Discogs.

  8. Jul 10,  · Follow The Leader, Microphone Fiend, The R, Put Your Hands Together etc etc are such dope tracks and like the first album weird interlude/ instrumental tracks were included which adds to the mystic vibe Rakim carried. Rakims rhymes are still some of the best rhymes EVER full stop/5.

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