8072344 - Various - [50+1] An Electronic Swindle (File, MP3)

Played by: Juno Recommends Hard House. Various Artists. Hard House Compil, Vol 2. Pokyteam - "Impulse" - BPM. Heath Aspinall - "Xbox! UK 01 Feb 15 Hard House. Hard Rave Soundz Vol 2. Mental Madness Germany. Shithead - "Shithead" radio edit - BPM. Neo Cortex - "I Want You! Punk Buster - "What? Lost Economies Vol 6. Funkylover - "Summer" - 64 BPM.

Fabric - "Supernova" - BPM. Ioshi - "Hoota" - BPM. Radianth - "Surfacing" original mix - BPM. B4sstee - "Disconnected" - BPM. Ripple - "Hashishin" - BPM. Hedlok - "Abused" - BPM. Fussion Series Vol Jorge Ortal - "" original mix - BPM. Q 08 Dec 14 UK Hardcore. Ibiza Closing Party. Dusky - "4T4" original mix - BPM. Route 94 - "Cowboy" original mix - BPM. Keep On My Side. Baby Blue. Wishing Chair. Keeping My Hands Tied. Yeah, Doin' It. Pipe Dream. Beautiful Local. Piss Pool. El Campeon Macizo.

Bottom Feeder. Jesus Arms. Trickledown Justice. One Piece Missing. What You Say. Train Surfing. Falling Down Laughing. Desert Town. It Goes. My Ruins. Pools Of Mercury. Things That Fly. I Am Not Kurt Schwitters. Hairshirt Fracture. Female As Thunder. Cinco De Mayo. The Beast Within. Chinese Balls. High school kids shouldn't be lugging home and slowly destroying 40 pounds of books every day. That racket would be transformed by e-books.

Only marginal doodling will be missed. I might find e-books useful for some of my reading. But the aesthetic pleasure of holding a book and turning the pages one by one is not small. Like receiving a typewritten family letter at Christmas instead of a handwritten one, something is irretrievably lost when the sensuous part of books is remaindered.

But ugly to read. And unable to display illustrations. Your Kindle books are tied to the device and will become obsolete as soon as it does. I'd be quite happy to by unlocked e-books that I could easily transfer to any device I owned now or in the futurebut not copy-protected Kindle books.

It's only as ugly as the fixed-width font you use to display it. Which can, I grant you, be pretty ugly, yes. One of the things that would make me a little cautious about PDF and Word, certainly, and possibly even HTML is the rate at which the standards continue to change, or seem to. PDF seems to go through a number of changes every time Adobe decides they want to sell a new version of Adobe Acrobat, adding new and different largely useless features. Word, of course, with Office or was it ?

It was bad enough when it was just Java but Flash is just an abomination when people start using it for menus and other basic navigation. I don't have a super-high degree of confidence that these formats will retain perfect backwards compatibility and inter-system operability for an extended time into the future. ASCII changes too, to be sure. But it changes very, very slowly. And it's simple enough that you can look at the underlying bits and bytes and figure out exactly what's going on.

Pogo, re: textbooks online: High School - yes Undergraduate - maybe Graduate - no I derive a lot of pleasure when I use my old physics textbooks to work through a new problem. The feel, the marginal notes, the feeling of retracing old paths, and yes, the smell.

Agreed about grad school books. Many worth keeping. Most undergrad stuff is instantly worthless, however, 8072344 - Various - [50+1] An Electronic Swindle (File by a "new" edition every year largely superficial changes, but it keeps the money coming in. Especially horrendous are the teachers who demand purchase of books that they themselves authored.

Worthless to the fourth power. I largely agree with Pogo's comment of p. I can easily see some exceptions, but I especially think we'd do a much better job at making sure public school kids had up-to-date textbooks, and that every kid had one, if they were digital.

It would also put an end to the huge backpacks I see on the kids at the nearby bus stop. I don't know that the costs will change, however. I expect publishers will 8072344 - Various - [50+1] An Electronic Swindle (File as much for the digital rights as they will for that overpriced hard copy.

And the used textbook market could conceivably disappear. Balfegor, The various encoding formats are versioned and documented. So long as your data is in a known format it should be readable forever. Some digital stuff. I have a Kindle. I love it. Hands down best piece of MP3) I've ever bought.

If you like to read, and if you have to travel a lot, the Kindle is a dream come true. If you say you like to read, but really just like to fill your house with books so visitors are impressed with your vast mostly unread collection, the Kindle is definitely not for you. I probably wouldn't recommend it for the casual reader or infrequent traveler.

Not a chance. My camera, yes. I can shove that into a plastic bag. Meghan Mcardle has been raving about hers. Maybe she just needs the cash?

I don't have one, but from what I have heard, they work fine from inside of a zip-lok bag in wet conditions. I like mine. I reviewed it reasonably favorablyand I don't get a cut from Amazon. My main issue with books as a kid was always that I had to reposition myself in bed every time I crossed to the other side of the spine.

Holding a particularly thick book open -- especially one with the text too close to the spine -- also sucked especially when eating at the same time. I pined for a book that could somehow always have the text on the same page, so that once I got comfortable, I could stay there. While I don't think the Kindle is there yet -- and the cost is definitely a bit much -- I'm not married to books as a reader, any more than I'm married to corks as an oenophile.

Larger 16bit color screen, heck of a lot faster I'm in heaven. And with Mobipocket I can do anything with it that I would actually want to do with the Kindle - and cheaper too. Oh - and the Palm does a lot that the Kindle doesn't. Or at least they haven't advertised it as having a calendar, memos, task list Dammit, now Ann has featured Simon's "Smell is the most powerful trigger to the memory there is" comment, further propagating this erroneous notion.

Perhaps I didn't state the case strongly enough, so I'll quote from my friend Luca Turin's excellent book on the science of smell called The Secret Of Scent : "The first reaction of most people when the subject of smell comes up is to mention its 'evocative' power, and to illustrate it with an anecdote about Granny's perfume. But the peculiar thing about smell cannot be that it evokes memories, because just about everything does.

How many times, for example, has one felt the pleasant pang of nostalgia upon hearing a pastel-coloured Bacharach melody gently rain down from the ceiling speaker above an airport loo?

Ever tried going out for dinner with the sister of a girl who dumped you and feeling those slightly rearranged facial features touch your heart when the light is right? No, the special thing about smell is that it is idiotic in the proper sense of the word, namely unique. There are no exact equivalents in smell, you have to hit the tiny nail smack on the head or you'll miss it by miles.

That's why the event is rare, and that's why we notice it. The uniqueness goes right down to the molecule level. As I've said, there are no synonyms: no two different compounds out of the hundreds of thousands made so far have identical smells. It smelled divinely of peachy skin, and no other floral lactonic before, during or since ever hit that exact spot.

And furthermore, they messed with the formula some years ago when the bean-counters took over, thereby putting your late grandmother's smell permanently out of reach. You are now officially at the mercy of fate, waiting for that moment fifteen years from now when you'll walk past a stall in a flea market, pick up a small sample bottle in a tattered black and gold box and stand there transfixed.

Or maybe you won't go to the market that day. I would never take a book I actually cared to keep with me either, for pretty much the same reasons. Sorry Ann, you're just the wrong generation for it, I guess.

I love my Kindle, its much easier on the eyes than a computer screen, unless you're in dim lighting. I read with a bedside lamp, and its awesome and simple. I love being able to order books in milliseconds, and I love getting the WSJ delivered to it every morning. But the most important thing is Catch up with the 21st century!

Get an Eee PC. You'll be able to read books, surf, read email, and hack wireless networks at the same time. Palladian, That's a stellar quote, in a style redolant of Paul Johnson's learned histories. This sounds like a failed pick-up line. I have a Kindle, and I think that it is a great device That purpose is for reading most of the non-permanent stuff we get. I'm talking magazines, newspapapers, paperbacks, etc.

I've only bought one reference book for the Kindle and I don't plan to buy any others. As far as the reading experience goes, mine is far different from Ann's. I find the Kindle to be very easy to read in a variety of lighting situations.

If the light is dimmer I just make the fonts bigger. The contrast is sufficient And, the fonts are sharp and very readable. My ideal Kindle would have a larger screen, revised 8072344 - Various - [50+1] An Electronic Swindle (File for next and previous page, a much better UI for the book catalog that would allow me to search and sort using a variety of book metadata, the ability to charge from the USB port instead of requiring the wall wartand would support DRM MOBI format files so I could download ebooks from my local library without the hassle of having to go thru a 3rd party program that converts the format to something I can read on my Kindle.

It would also have a native PDF reader. I have a couple of blog posts on the Kindle, here and hereexplaining my thoughts on the Kindle and where the future of e-publishing is going. Please give them a read and let me know what you think. Pogo, interesting to compare his prose with Paul Johnson.

Turin's a very interesting guy, a fabulous writer, perfume fanatic, airplane enthusiast, and biophysicist who may have helped figure out the mechanism of olfactory reception, which is an extraordinary combination to say the least. I was honored that he wrote a little piece sort of about me in a Swiss magazine where he writes a monthly column.

You want to check for smells on those, but not in a good way! Same with library books. Personally, I'm allergic to books.

I mean, the dusty book smell. Every time I read to my son at night, I get a stuffy, itchy nose. It won't stop me from reading, but I sure could live without it! Polymaths with a sense of humor are always good reads. Their metaphors are often a kind of genius. A sign of the End Times, I'm sure. I don't read literature or novels, because I'm just not interested in fiction, but I do have an amazing collection of music history and music theory texts - my collection would put some colleges to shame - some of which are ancient.

I have a special chair I read in, with a special lamp to read by, and the experience of opening up one of those old books is like a form of total sensory immersion: The MP3), the smell, the look and the environment I created all add up to a complete and satisfying experience.

No electronic book gizmo will ever replace that for me, and I love my gizmos! If the service allowed me to download ancient codices I'm interested in - complete with illuminations and illustrations - I'd rather read them on my 23" Cinema HD display than a little tablet anyway.

A perspective from somebody "too young to be a boomer but too old for generation X" :- : I do much of my reading for pleasure on a Palm TX. Got it for half the price of the Kindle in a post-Thanksgiving sale. I even found a Backpack client for it.

One of the font settings seems to be just what my astigmatic eyes want. And the device is so small and light that I can carry it on my belt and read literally anywhere, anytime. In fact, I've basically stopped reading paperbacks since my eyesight simply isn't what it used to be. And hardbacks just are a pain in the neck to lug around, not to mention way too expensive outside the USA.

The screen and device are just too anemic for scholarly reading at least in the sciences. Some things I still prefer to do with a red pen on a double-spaced dead-tree copy editing papers, for instance, as I'm freer to annotate, do calculation in the margins, I get a Kindle, and finally Ann posts an update about it, 6 months later, woo! Put out a link or something, you know? After playing with this e-reader for 5 days solid I have to say, it rocks.

I called Tech Support and asked for a refund, which they were happy to give. I read online that there are rumours Amazon will charge for it, but Support said absolutely not. This after I bought 20 Amazon Kindle ebooks. I'm in heaven and my pocketbook is alongside. Look, the Kindle is not for everyone. This Kindle thingie is amazing. It combines the three most important values in American life: Convenience.

And independence I've had clunky e-readers before, and this doesn't begin to compare. But we all are futurists, everyone of us, products as we are of the modern age. We can project to a time when Kindle 1. The thing is, that date is no where near close-by.

Get it, if you can. I still don't have a Crackberry. Cheers, Victoria. I'm not condoning nor asking people to go out and search for it. But just like anything online, if I can find it, anyone can.

Here is a more legal site. Scroll down to the url with the "kindleguide". Download it, and install it in your Kindle or Mobi. Lots of classics there, in nicer format than Project Gutenberg. And then there's this.

You have to register, and you get only 3 at a time, per month, but we're talking about current NYT Best-Sellers. Kraftwerk - Neon Lights. Ralph Records. Missing Link. Rendezvous as Schult Rheingold - Rheingold. Rendezvous as E. Schult Rheingold - Dreiklangs-Dimensionen 7", Single. EMI-Odeon S. Kraftwerk - Taschenrechner. Rheingold - Fan Fan Fanatisch. Computerwelt as Schult Kraftwerk - Computerwelt.

Warner Bros. Sanguine Records. Toshiba RecordsToshiba Records. MP3) Record Co. Fan Fan Fanatic as E. Schult Rheingold - Fan Fan Fanatic. Die Neue Deutsche Tanzmusik. SonocordDeutscher Schallplattenclub. Das Model as E. LP, Album. Rock-TrendRock-Trend. Via Satellit as E. Schult Rheingold - Via Satellit 7", Single. Albion Records. Planet Rock as E. Tommy Boy. Kling KlangEMI. Touch And Go. Wonderland 3. The Model as Schult Star Inc. Star Inc. Black Music. Trans Europe Express as E.

Strange Ways Records. Laser 2. Autobahn Huah! L'Age D'Or. ZYX Records. LaserLight Digital. Capitol RecordsCapitol Gold Cuts. Mega Sound. Radio Activity as Schult Star Inc. Star Direct. Deutsch Englische Freundschaft. Autobahn as Schult and 5 more… Kraftwerk - The Mix.

Object Enterprises. Fan Fan Fanatisch as E. Warner Music Vision. VirginVirgin. Kraftwerk - The Model - Retrospective SPV Records.

The Balanescu Quartet - Possessed. Point Productions. Music Club. Impuls International. Elektric Music - Esperanto. Das Modell Robert 13 - Sine. Discomagic Records. Kraftwerk - Academy Theatre 2xCD. Paper Corn Music. Big Music. Dino EntertainmentDino Entertainment. Vulcan 3. Total Vegas Recordings. The Model as Schult Terrorvision - Oblivion. Prima Musik. GiG RecordsReverso.

The Psychoanalyst - Success (4) - Social Network Junkies (CD, Album), Still, Still With Thee - Tennessee Ernie Ford - Let Me Walk With Thee: Tennesse Ernie Ford Sings So, Just Out Of Reach (Of My Two Empty Arms) - Percy Sledge - The Ultimate Collection - When A Man Loves, Over My Head - Fleetwood Mac - Fleetwood Mac (Vinyl, LP, Album), Freddy Krueger - S.O.D.* - Live At Budokan (CD, Album), Lay Lady Lay - The Bob Dylan Song Book - Tribute (CD), Mort Sahl, Shelley Berman, Jack Paar, Joey Bishop & Phyllis Diller / The Reason I Wear The Coat, Fuck Battlin - Bugz Of D12* - The One Man Mob Mixtape (CDr), Lullaby - James - Laid (CD, Album), Cant Get Blue Monday Out Of My Head - Kylie* - Boombox: The Remix Album 2000-2008 (CD), When Love Breaks Down - Various - DJ Hits Vol. 308 (CD), Prima Del Tuo Cuore - Amanda Lear - Let Me Entertain You (CD, Album)

Surviving members of the band have remained relatively quiet since Brainiac except for Schmersal, who has put together the group Enon. Labels: Jim Carroll. Labels: CalifoneRed Red Meat.

Labels: Howlin MaggieHowlin' Maggie. Newer Posts Older Posts Home. Subscribe to: Posts Atom. Between The Eyes. Highway Of Souls. Before I Crawl. Ibiza Bar. Out Of Focus. See Your Mind. Side With You. Cool School Trane Of Thought. Searching For Roses. Half Past You. Head Of Ringo. In Through The Outside.

Split In Two. Far Gone. I Can't Stand Nobody. Rust Belt. Savvy Kangaroos. Free Mars. The Hotel Family Affair. Black Sea Me. Kill The King. Ecco - "Baobab" original mix - BPM. Review: Toolroom Live 01 is a behemoth. At 61 tracks large, inclusive of three continues DJ mixes, this new concept by Toolroom, as they say, is to highlight key artists, present new tracks, and give their fans a taste of the live experience.

On here there's music from Harvey Mckay, Gary Beck and Maison Sky, to Bat For Lashes, Hot Since 82 and label owner Mark Knight, and if you're looking to grasp the Toolroom Live concept and other oddities you might not expectwhile getting some bang from your buck, this release is a well informed start. UKF Bass Culture 3. Seba - "Addicted" - BPM. Nero - "Satisfy" - BPM.

Savant - "Sledgehammer" - BPM. DD 08 Sep 14 Dub. Toolroom Ibiza Vol 2. LD remix - BPM. Lxury - "Company" original mix - BPM. Dosem - "Components" original mix - BPM. Hard House Compilation Series Vol 4. Hard House Compilation Series Vol 3. Chase Yer Tail CYT 03 May 14 Techno. Gorebug - "Mutant" - BPM. Amalaraxia - "Chase" - BPM. Suvjet - "Lavatory" - BPM. Blastikz - "Lost" - BPM. Gontlath - "Bassrambler" - BPM. Praxia - "Catalyst" - BPM. Subver5ion - "Subliminal" - BPM.

Neurosplit - "Parallel" - BPM. Energy Rekords. Infinite Zero. Anthony Rother - Trans Europa Express 12". Messenger Records. PolyMeDia 2. CD, Album. The Model as E. Virtual Music. Off Woodward. Autobahn as Schult Fink 2 - Mondscheiner. Setanta Records. ARS Productions. Euro Ralph. Emperor Norton. Universal MusicEMI.

Wall Of Sound. Kraftwerk - Somewhere In Europe. Not On Label Kraftwerk. Bizarre Music 2. Radio Activity as E. Tranz as E. MAW Records.

Schuit Partia - Szminka I Krew. Ars Mundi. Ultra Records. Absolute 2. Ninthwave RecordsNinthwave Records. Stockholm Records. EMI Gold. TrikontTrikont. Radioactivity as E. Big 8 Records. Essay Recordings. Chrom RecordsMatrix Musik. Trax Records. Warner Strategic Marketing United Kingdom. Sound Pollution. ParlophoneParlophone. Voodoo Rhythm. Junk Music. Kraftwerk - Minimum-Maximum. EMIVirgin. Ministry of Sound Germany. Papa Records. Van Richter. Stupido RecordsHumppa Records.

Talk Various - The Dome Vol. Polystar 3EMI. Tokuma Japan Communications. Kalinkaland Records. Talk as E. NOW Music Denmark. Multicolor Recordings. Lua Music. Warner Music UK Ltd. Music For Dreams. Universal Music Group. AstralwerksAstralwerksReceptorsMusic. District 6. Westpark Music. AstralwerksAstralwerks. Mojo Magazine. Autobahn Man Or Astro-Man? Cherry RedCherry Red Films. Motorway as E. Schult Magnetic Morning - A.

Friend Or Faux Recordings. I can't make marginal notes on an ecopy either. OTOH, for entertainment reading I'd go for electronic in a second if they fix the readability issue. As it is, with rare exceptions I'll read a novel or nonfiction book and then throw it in a pile to take to the local used book store.

What a waste of paper! And space, since I don't get to the used book store all that often. I didn't think I'd make the transition to music files from CDs either, but it's been relatively effortless.

I still buy some CDs because mpgs don't quite have the quality for stuff I listen to on my home stereo, but for the bulk of my music purchases, it's files all the way. A certain flower or a whiff of smoke can bring up experiences long forgotten. He was a cigar smoker and usually wore a bit of after-shave. The beautiful smile on her face when she opens one of her father's books and catches a whiff of long-ago smoke or cologne is something that can never be caused by an electronic book.

Seeing a few cigar ashes between pages, or spotting a drop of coffee stain brings her closer to her father. A Kindle can't do that. I have a shelf of technical manuals that could serve very well if loaded onto a Kindle for use int eh garage, shop and field, where books and DVD-containing laptops don't function well.

That would be a very good use for a Kindle, I think, especially if the manuals could be updated and supplemented periodically. I still have the copy of Elements of Style purchased while I was a high school student. It's now ratty, but remains a keepsake because of the marginal notes, doodles and telephone numbers of then-girlfriends.

The memories it provides cannot be replaced by an electronic book, no matter how easy to use. I understand all the problems of reading from a computer screen. As a lawyer, when I have to read a document of any complexity, I print it out. And yet, I like my Kindle. I've read two books on it so far and regularly read the Wall Street Journal on it. It's not perfect, and I sometimes have difficulty getting it to recognize my flash card, but I would hate to give it up. When you buy a book you own the book and you can read it whenever you like.

You can lend it to MP3) friend. You can sell it. A book is always compatible. But the last 35 years of recorded music have shown, anything electronic is obsolescent. Ponder the words of Richard Stallman: We still have the same old freedoms in using paper books and other analog media. But if e-books replace printed books, those freedoms will not transfer.

That is the world the publishers want for us. If you buy the Amazon Kindle we call it the Swindle or the Sony Reader we call it the Shreader for what it threatens to do to books, you pay to establish that world.

I recently read a couple of novels, entirely on-line, thanks to Baen publishing's habit of putting a selection of back catalog titles online for free. The experience makes me wonder how many people who "can't read anything long" on a computer screen, might be using old fashioned CRT monitors, or have their screen resolution improperly set for their screen. I too used to get headaches squinting at the vaguely blurry text on the average monitor as opposed to the crisp lines of text in the average novel.

That at least is a problem of the past. I spend many hours a day reading on the computer screen, but I still don't like the Kindle screen. It's too dark. If my computer was dark like that it would be completely unacceptable. Sorry about the double post. I've not seen the Kindle yet. If it's too dark I can completely understand that it's not optimal.

But just because the Kindle isn't optimal, doesn't invalidate idea of reading on, say, a laptop with a nice bright, but not glaring display of course. Ideally, what I'd like to see is college texts made available electronically, at a fraction of the price of their hardbound competitors. That, and electronic copies of, say computer reference manuals, seems to be the perfect niche for electronic readers.

Re: FLS: But the last 35 years of recorded music have shown, anything electronic is obsolescent. ASCII text. A stalwart of the digital era for forty years. Anyhow, regarding borrowing and sharing and all that, if there's one thing the past ten years have taught us, it's that if you encrypt data people buy for single or limited use, people will crack your encryption. Look at MP3's -- for years, people tried to lock down digital music, with Apple's crippleware or Microsoft's ironically named "Playsforsure" copy protection.

And look at us now! Naysayers said it would never happen. Optimists said it would. And Amazon now sells unlocked MP3s. I have one playing on my computer now in fact. Even Apple -- whose total commitment to the vision of a completely locked-down and controlled computing environment makes Microsoft 8072344 - Various - [50+1] An Electronic Swindle (File like Hapsburg bumblers -- has given in and offers unlocked MP3s.

If anything, things are better for the consumer now than they were before -- no more scratchy third and fourth generation copies. If a friend likes the music you're playing, you can make them a perfect a copy at least, a perfect copy of what you have.

And if they feel guilty about it, they can get a copy themselves. Don't have to hunt through back catalogues and used music stores to find it. Obviously, books haven't come as far as music has, because devices like the Reader and the Kindle have only emerged recently, in the last two years, unlike MP3 players, which have been available since at leastif I recall correctly, and maybe earlier I think I got my first MP3 player in Seoul in earlyand there was already a huge variety of devices available then.

I have a pretty high degree of confidence that books will follow MP3s eventually. The presence of a single dominant party, like Amazon, in the electronic bookselling business analogous to Apple, in the digital music businessis probably going to retard that somewhat, but I don't really have much doubt that it will work out to our benefit in the end.

School textbooks should be online. That whole market needs to go belly up. High school kids shouldn't be lugging home and slowly destroying 40 pounds of books every day. That racket would be transformed by e-books. Only marginal doodling will be missed. I might find e-books useful for some of my reading. But the aesthetic pleasure of holding a book and turning the pages one by one is not 8072344 - Various - [50+1] An Electronic Swindle (File.

Like receiving a typewritten family letter at Christmas instead of a handwritten one, something is irretrievably lost when the sensuous part of books is remaindered.

But ugly to read. And unable to display illustrations. Your Kindle books are tied to the device and will become obsolete as soon as it does. I'd be quite happy to by unlocked e-books that I could easily transfer to any device I owned now or in the futurebut not copy-protected Kindle books. It's only as ugly as the fixed-width font you use to display it.

Which can, I grant you, be pretty ugly, yes. One of the things that would make me a little cautious about PDF and Word, certainly, and possibly even HTML is the MP3) at which the standards continue to change, or seem to. PDF seems to go through a number of changes every time Adobe decides they want to sell a new version of Adobe Acrobat, adding new and different largely useless features. Word, of course, with Office or was it ? It was bad enough when it was just Java but Flash is just an abomination when people start using it for menus and other basic navigation.

I don't have a super-high degree of confidence that these formats will retain perfect backwards compatibility and inter-system operability for an extended time into the future. ASCII changes too, to be sure. But it changes very, very slowly. And it's simple enough that you can look at the underlying bits and bytes and figure out exactly what's going on. Pogo, re: textbooks online: High School - yes Undergraduate - maybe Graduate - no I derive a lot of pleasure when I use my old physics textbooks to work through a new problem.

The feel, the marginal notes, the feeling of retracing old paths, and yes, the smell. Agreed about grad school books. Many worth keeping. Most undergrad stuff is instantly worthless, however, overtaken by a "new" edition every year largely superficial changes, but it keeps the money coming in. Especially horrendous are the teachers who demand purchase of books that they themselves authored.

Worthless to the fourth power. I largely agree with Pogo's comment of p. I can easily see some exceptions, but I especially think we'd do a much better job at making sure public school kids had up-to-date textbooks, and that every kid had one, if they were digital. It would also put an end to the huge backpacks I see on the kids at the nearby bus stop. I don't know that the costs will change, however. I expect publishers will charge as much for the digital rights as they will for that overpriced hard copy.

And the used textbook market could conceivably disappear. Balfegor, The various encoding formats are versioned and documented. So long as your data is in a known format it should be readable forever.

Some digital stuff. I have a Kindle. I love it. Hands down best piece of tech I've ever bought. If you like to read, and if you have to travel a lot, the Kindle is a dream come true. If you say you like to read, but really just like to fill your house with books so visitors are impressed with your vast mostly unread collection, the Kindle is definitely not for you. I probably wouldn't recommend it for the casual reader or infrequent traveler.

Not a chance. My camera, yes. I can shove that into a plastic bag. Meghan Mcardle has been raving about hers. Maybe she just needs the cash? I don't have one, but from what I have heard, they work fine from inside of a zip-lok bag in wet conditions. I like mine. I reviewed it reasonably favorablyand I don't get a cut from Amazon.

My main issue with books as a kid was always that I had to reposition myself in bed every time I crossed to the other side of the spine. Holding a particularly thick book open -- especially one with the text too close to the spine -- also sucked especially when eating at the same time. I pined for a book that could somehow always have the text on the same page, so that once I got comfortable, I could stay there. While I don't think the Kindle is there yet -- and the cost is definitely a bit much -- I'm not married to books as a reader, any more than I'm married to corks as an oenophile.

Larger 16bit color screen, heck of a lot faster I'm in heaven. And with Mobipocket I can do anything with it that I would actually want to do with the Kindle - and cheaper too. Oh - and the Palm does a lot that the Kindle doesn't. Or at least they haven't advertised it as having a calendar, memos, task list Dammit, now Ann has featured Simon's "Smell is the most powerful trigger to the memory there is" comment, further propagating this erroneous notion.

Perhaps I didn't state the case strongly enough, so I'll quote from my friend Luca Turin's excellent book on the science of smell called The Secret Of Scent : "The first reaction of most people when the subject of smell comes up is to mention its 'evocative' power, and to illustrate it with an anecdote about Granny's perfume. But the peculiar thing about smell cannot be that it evokes memories, because just about everything does.

How many times, for example, has one felt the pleasant pang of nostalgia upon hearing a pastel-coloured Bacharach melody gently rain down from the ceiling speaker above an airport loo? MP3) tried going out for dinner with the sister of a girl who dumped you and feeling those slightly rearranged facial features touch your heart when the light is right?

No, the special thing about smell is that it is idiotic in the proper sense of the word, namely unique. There are no exact equivalents in smell, you have to hit the tiny nail smack on the head or you'll miss it by miles. That's why the event is rare, and that's why we notice it. The uniqueness goes right down to the molecule level.

As I've said, there are no synonyms: no two different compounds out of the hundreds of thousands made so far have identical smells. It smelled divinely of peachy skin, and no other floral lactonic before, during or since ever hit that exact spot. And furthermore, they messed with the formula some years ago when the bean-counters took over, thereby putting your late grandmother's smell permanently out of reach.

You are now officially at the mercy of fate, waiting for that moment fifteen years from now when you'll walk past a stall in a flea market, pick up a small sample bottle in a tattered black and gold box and stand there transfixed. Or maybe you won't go to the market that day. I would never take a book I actually cared to keep with me either, for pretty much the same reasons.

Sorry Ann, you're just the wrong generation for it, I guess. I love my Kindle, its much easier on the eyes than a computer screen, unless you're in dim lighting. I read with a bedside lamp, and its awesome and simple. I love being able to order books in milliseconds, and I love getting the WSJ delivered to it every morning.

But the most important thing is Catch up with the 21st century! Get an Eee PC. You'll be able to read books, surf, read email, and hack wireless networks at the same time. Palladian, That's a stellar quote, in a style redolant of Paul Johnson's learned histories.

I Wake In The Morning - Water, Wind & Fire - Water, Wind & Fire (Vinyl, LP, Album), Ill See You In My Dreams - Bing Crosby - Forever Bing (CD), Spare Any Change - Busted Bearings / Bully (7) - Busted Bearings / Bully (Vinyl), И Пока Маленький - Имантс Скрастиньш* - Раймондс Паулс* - Трубка Мечтаний (Vinyl, LP, Album), Say Yeah - Kiss - Sonic Boom Over Europe - Malmö June 13, 2010 (CDr), Bring Me Down - Joe Budden - The King Of New Jersey (CD, Album), The §_machine (Interlude) - Fredotchky_Machine - !System Of A Dance! (CD), Listen Fiesta - Various - Scorpia - Live (CD), Axis - Say I Am, Lucent (2) - Penguin For The Sake Of Penguin (CD, Album), Baby, Please Dont Go - John Lee Hooker - Warner Blues Les Incontournables (CD)

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