Without You In My Life - Christopher Holland* - Brother Sun Sister Moon (CD, Album)

Why not read along with Rob Smyth and Scott Murray? Published: 12 Apr Published: 28 Mar Film blog Kirk Douglas: a career in clips. Here we look back at some of his finest moments, from Paths of Glory to Ace in the Hole. Published: 6 Feb Sportblog Kobe Bryant: six classic moments that made him great. The Lakers legend, who died on Sunday, delivered five championships and countless brilliant plays. We run down some moments to savor from his career. Published: 27 Jan I said, "I don't know if I can do it.

What time are you going to be in the office? This song is a story in itself, a total chapter. I took the groove of 'On My Word', and I started force-feeding lines from 'Try' into it, until it took its own shape.

Then 'On My Word' was out the window, and 'Try' was there. I wrote it out a little bit more in the morning, wrote out the words, got in the car, walked down to Jerry's office and I played it for him. He liked it. He put his tape recorder on, wrote some notes down, banged on the piano - I had that little horn section in it that I wrote for it.

He said, "Great! Then I heard that Lorraine had cut it, but I didn't even hear her version of it, because I was on to something else - some other horses, some other music. We'll have to do this in part one and part two, yeah? We have a show tonight in Buckingham. We're supposed to all meet down here in the lobby at 12, and it's after 12 now.

Three more shows, then we're off to Europe. Set part two up with Florence for when I'm back in town, or we can do it over the phone. Boys, I'm headin'. S'POP: Yes. It sounds so Taylor-written for her. I got this little groove with it and my friend Ted Daryll and I worked on it together. I liked the little groove, a cool little groove.

I didn't know what we were going to do with the thing. It was like "I'm a one-eyed cat, sneaking round the corner, trying to get to you. One of the guys in the office made the decision to play it for her.

I didn't. S'POP: Well, it was a good idea, because it turned out a really great record. It had a wonderful professional staff that truly loved the music that was coming in and really worked hard to find artists for the songs. And David Rosner was the guy that was the real hero of that company. He was just wonderful, so passionate in everything. They did great. They got ideas right away for my songs and they were excited about them.

Without You In My Life - Christopher Holland* - Brother Sun Sister Moon (CD couldn't ask for better surroundings. S'POP: You were responsible for finding and signing other writers too? Right away, I brought in Al Gorgoni, who was my partner at the time.

I wanted to write with Without You In My Life - Christopher Holland* - Brother Sun Sister Moon (CD a little bit, so I brought him into the company. And I brought Billy Vera into the company. I always liked Billy. I was always jealous of Billy. I thought he wrote some cool things that I couldn't write.

I was jealous of one particular song of his, but I can't remember what it was. And then I brought James Taylor in. That was the big thing. You Without You In My Life - Christopher Holland* - Brother Sun Sister Moon (CD imagine how much glad I am to have this. A tough call, that one! She had a great version of it. Walter Jackson used to perform on crutches. He was truly one of the great soul singers of that generation. He wasn't like a performing soul singer, he felt this stuff. He would reach the masses in the way he performed.

Garnett Mimms was great, but he was more over the top. Walter had a certain sadness to his whole way of singing that was wonderful. S'POP: Fangette told us that when she first met Walter he had a residency at some jazz club or something? I didn't meet him. S'POP: You didn't meet him? I was kind of behind the scenes at most times. I wasn't hanging out in the music business.

I was married to Joanie and, having the kids, I wasn't so typically in the business running around. I would just go in, write my songs and come back. S'POP: You were a nine to five-er? So it was a double job I had, just like you guys! But right now, this is an amazing time for me.

I think back to the time, there was so much energy floating around in those days. We Album) taking over the business. But now, the way we're on tour, and what we're doing with John [Platania] and Kendel [Carson], there's new energy going on around here. We don't know where it's taking us, but with that band, there's wonderful stuff around.

I never knew Chip with Flying Machine. Sometimes, people say that I was, but I never worked with James Taylor in my life. I don't know how that connection came about. John was doing this stuff with Bang and I was doing my other stuff. All of a sudden, when I decide for a solo career, John enters the picture and from then we knew each other. I had never met Bert, though. I came in, they made the deal. I just signed the deal with that group and Bert died. So that was it for everybody.

Van [Morrison] left too about the same time. He was sort of run out of town. S'POP: That would have been '67 or '68?

I think Van probably left some time that year. S'POP: Bert died at the end of ' That was you and Al Gorgoni?

I loved working with Al, period. We demoed it. It sounded like it would work as a nice duet, so we demoed it singing it together.

So I was kind of producing it with Al. We got it back from the Album) and I said, "This sounds like a hit to me just the way it is. A guy was in town from Minute Man Records from Boston.

He had done something else with April Blackwood and he heard it. He said, "I think this sounds like a hit. To make a long story short, we put it out on Minute Man and it broke so fast that Al and I were rushed into the studio to do an album as the thing was going up the charts. Minute Man couldn't handle it. It was so big and they were just a little label in Boston.

So they sold it over to Colpix. They sold 60, on Minute Man and thenon Colpix. Colpix was going bankrupt, so they sold it to Kapp. So, it was a big selling record. It probably soldorsingles, but its chart position was smaller than it would have been had it been on the one label. So it got into the top 40 or something.

They said Al was in the band. And Al was the one who didn't really want to go on the road. We ended up doing the Dick Clark Show and all those things. You [Chip] get a hit and the record label goes bust. That's the business, isn't it? Doom and gloom? The label carried on for many years. She was trying to figure out where to go from that point. S'POP: She was involved in the business? She's almost an untouchable woman. She's a tough woman.

But, from what I remember, she was completely in control, absolutely in control in business, and remained so, until recently, when Sony bought Bang. Maybe it was at that point that Van got royalties. My only association was at meetings, which I remember one or two times, with Ilene, and going into a studio with Chris Houston from the Undertakers, the British band.

S'POP: He became an engineer. He did all that stuff. Now he's in Nashville - a studio designer, a great engineer. CHIP TAYLOR: The thing about Bang - it may turn out to be one of these labels that didn't treat people right, or whatever, but the energy of Bang reminds me of a similar energy from the tough stuff, the darker stuff, like Atlantic Records or something.

There were certain people doing poppy things - real keyboard oriented things - and certain people doing gut-felt things. Solomon Burke was one of those - he could do it.

It was nothing about precision. Bert just wanted an organic thing going on in the studio. S'POP: John, did you play in bands? But I was still Upstate, working with bands. I was working with a trio, which is when Van's people saw me and asked me to audition. I think we'd met once or twice. We crossed paths. At that point I knew 'Brown Eyed Girl'. I knew Them's stuff. But beyond that, no. He had left New York to go to Boston, where he landed after leaving Bang.

He had to leave town - literally - because he was coerced. He didn't want to fulfil his obligations because he wasn't getting any money. S'POP: I've heard a couple of outtakes he did. They didn't like that at all. They didn't finally release it - hysterical stuff! Quite clever titles, as funny as can be. They were just right off the top of his head. Anyway, they pressured him out.

He wound up in Boston and somehow his managers at some point signed him to Warners. From Boston he moved to Woodstock. I did various studio things. For over a year now, we reconnected. I've always been in touch.

He's always trying to get me to move here, but I don't want to do that right now at this point. S'POP: Does he gig much these days? I played with him at Montreux. We started it up for was James Taylor, totally for James.

So Mickey offered a deal with Jubilee. The nice thing was they gave us a little studio - a little hole in the ground, but it was free.

So, any time we wanted, we could just go in there and do experiments. That's how we started. We did all the early James Taylor things at that studio. The first thing James put on the tape in that little studio was "Hey mom and dad, this is my first rock'n'roll record! He doesn't sound Top He's going to get difficulty getting played on the radio.

Let's put an album out by him and do like the blues thing. He's been playing in a New York club called the Night Owl. If we could just do this in three markets. They almost did it. That would have been great, but their thing was, "Let's do singles. My brand new concept was to try him in a different way.

We had meetings and meetings and they finally said, "No. You did one yourself. I liked that. S'POP: So, you let the label fizzle out? Once I didn't have a good concept to think back and forth with the label, it wasn't worth it. Were they a real group? Yes, Jordan Christopher and the Wild Ones, they were a real group. S'POP: Did you produce it? And that kind of inspired me that day to start thinking about writing another song and 'Wild Thing' came out.

S'POP: Did they name themselves before the record? They'd been floating around, but I didn't really know them. No one really knew them.

Jordan Christopher's band, the Wild Ones, was the house band with this disco. I played there myself. It was around 57th Street. I played there, so I pretty much know that scene, while I was signed to Bang. The Scene was really a listening venue and Arthur's was the first disco in New York. Other than in LA, there was nothing in the States other than those two places.

Chip played me the record. It had strings and stuff on. It was terrible! All the records in the late '50s and '60s were done by arrangers writing out every note for every player. So, when you walked into a session, most of the time it was with strings and horns and stuff.

So it was like Sinatra, finally winding down to rock'n'roll. Even though it was coming into rock'n'roll, there were always still going to be some string players around. In his dad's footsteps, Michael Gandolfini finds his own way Michael Gandolfini's face is thinner.

John Richardson's final Picasso book arrives in November Few books have been more anticipated among art lovers. Marie Osmond takes singing career in new symphonic direction The coronavirus pandemic brought the world to a halt. Britney's father is out, but scrutiny of him just beginning Britney Spears and her attorney have successfully driven her father from the conservatorship that runs her life and controls her money. Remembering a relentless publicist, never too proud to beg Publicist Bobby Zarem has died at Blige and Kendrick Lamar to perform Super Without You In My Life - Christopher Holland* - Brother Sun Sister Moon (CD halftime show.

Dubai opens Expo to a world still reeling from pandemic Dubai is opening Expo in an extravagant ceremony that was delayed a year by the coronavirus pandemic. Because not only is it next to impossible to find, but The Churchills is one of those rarer-than-rare records that actually lives up to its reputation.

From the opening bars of the first song on Side One, "Open Your Eyes" - an explosion of ecstatic screams and fuzz, "faces, lips and teeth and eyes; diamond rings and pretty things, and arms and legs and thighs" - you know this is going to be one amazing trip.

Track after track the album continues to astonish, delivering everything from electrifying psychedelic rock to evocative pop ballads with equal degrees of skill and originality. Soulfully delivered vocals, searing fuzz guitars, spacey sound effects, exotic Eastern flourishes - the Churchills use a dazzling palate of tones and colours, stretching the primitive Tel Aviv studio technology of the day to its limits to create one of the most brilliant psychedelic albums from anywhere in the world, let alone Israel.

Although there's elements of the Yardbirds, Cream, Hendrix the Doors, and the Jefferson Airplane especially the studio trickery of After Bathing At Baxter'sthe sound of the Churchills is very much their own personal vision - a distinct blend of East and West that is unmistakably from their own corner of the world.

Bottom of the Soul Absolutely Positively Soul Love Somethin Hurtin On Me Affirmative No' The Trap The Eagle Never Hunts the Fly No Girl Gonna Cry To the Light Listen Tin Can Beach Listen Time Out For a Daydream Astrologically Incompatible Discrepancy Talk Me Down I've Loved You Listen You'll Love Me Again In My Neighborhood Double Yellow Line Much of the material on Warner, however, was recorded by the original group, and this album was pasted together from some singles some of which had appeared on Original Sound in and other tracks, both by the original incarnation and a second outfit that was pretty much a Sean Bonniwell solo vehicle.

Accordingly, the tone of the album is pretty uneven, but much of the material is excellent. In fact, some of the songs rate among their best; a few are also found on the Rhino anthology, but other first-rate tunes "Bottom of the Soul," "Talk Me Down," "The Trap" are not.

Some of the cuts presumably those recorded after the first lineup broke up find Bonniwell branching out from psych-punk into a poppier and more eclectic direction, sometimes with very good results, sometimes not. Long out of print and difficult to find, the entire album is included on the Sundazed CD reissue Beyond the Garage, meaning that it's no longer necessary to search for an original copy.

A slightly different sound than the first album, different musicians and all that, but still Sean Bonniwell at his peak of genius. A generous handful of all-time rock masterpieces on this album and the weaker tracks are still pretty darn good. An extremely essential album alongside the first one.

As many truly great songs as just about any other rock album. Buffy Sainte-Marie - - Illuminations The result is a weird off the wall album that is all at once spacey, trippy and hauntingly addictive. The album was finally released about a year later. Eleven songs from these session were later compiled for our second LP, Aesop's Apocalypse, that was released in early about a year after we split up.

Currently the four of us are working with Lee to compile a CD collection of Untold Fables tracks from our various vinyl releases as well as a few unreleased live and demo tracks. Source : hometown. I Can't Quit You I Gotta Move Communication Breakdown Killing Floor She Wants You - London Blues Dazed And Confused Los Angeles, CA, U.

Marsupilami - - Marsupilami Track listing Dorian Deep Born To Be Free Facilis Descencus Averni A mixture of blues, experimental jazz and hints of folk, their music is often dark and foreboding, favouring perilously complex structures. Their second album, which features an additional member on flute and sax as well as the appearance of the Mellotron, is an ambitious concept album about the brutal culture of ancien Rome — quite a sordid affair, really, but well done.

It has a slightly better sound than the first album although most progsters generally favour the first. Source: progarchives. Fraction - - Moon Blood. Fraction - - Moon Blood Sanc-Divided Come Out of Her Eye of the Hurricane Sons Come to Birth Dawning Light Intercessor's Blues A rare and heavy psychedelic gem that is all too often overlooked.

Despite having some christian undertones, this album is just about as raw and unbridled as it gets. As an aside, I'd like to thank everyone who has been posting comments lately Here's a review from Lysergia. I would be very hard pressed to name a better private psychedelic LP than "Moonblood".

Like the CA Quintet album this is that very rare thing, a concept album that works. Where the CA Quintet floods our minds with images of the various hells we create on earth, Fraction seize on the heaven we fail to create.

I always feel my spine tingle when listening to this album, it never fails to astonish me. The vocalist Jim Beach sounds like he is undergoing agonized conflicts of faith, a righteous man, growling, snarling and finally screaming at a world where seekers after truth are downtrodden.

The guitars are so overloaded with effects that they sound like a storm raging on the surface of another world. The drums have fantastic range, at times very delicate, at other times, pounding with raw energy.

This really works as they sound very fresh and alive, like the band is playing right next to you. There is nothing righteous or preachy on the LP. You can feel the inner turmoil boiling over. The themes are broadly Christian, but with a very strong pagan element incorporated. The Son will come to birth and free Mother Earth.

Mind-bending lyrics spat and shouted over a haze of fuzz and wah-wah, it builds and builds to an impossible intensity, you wonder where else the vocal chords can go, the fingers of the guitar players must have been wrecked. The hazy image of the band on the front of the Austrian boot which was the first reissue showed a band that looked beyond cool, crazy shaggy burns, shades and leathers.

They stare down at you like some crazed pack of angry bikers about to ink over your tattooes. Guitarist and singer Steve Cataldo wrote all of the material for the group, which played psychedelia. Front Page Review's album was finally unearthed for CD release in Pinball Wizard.

Martin Fischer Pete Huish. Typical late '60's rock with heavy guitar, vocal harmonies and powerful instrumentation.

Freak - Norma Loy - Baphomet (File, Album), Candy - Dr Zoot* - Ghosts Of Swing (CD, Album), Strange Romance - Arthur Brown and Craig Leon - The Complete Tapes Of Atoya (Vinyl, LP, Album), Fist Held High - Thrust (6) - Fist Held High & Reincarnation (Box Set, Album), Hole The Size Of My Heart - Tony Moreno (8) - Leftovers From A Wake (CDr, Album), DJ Omar (3) vs. Oscar Akagy - The Shake (Vinyl), Man Gave Names To All The Animals - Bob Dylan - Slow Train Coming (Vinyl, LP, Album), Sca - Adam Certamen Bownik - Dimensional Scales (File, Album), На Самом, На Краю Земли - Пикник - Энциклопедия Российского Рока (Cassette), Happy Endings, Los Amigos Alegres - Latin American Music (Vinyl, LP), Pingurine - Cock And Ball Torture - Cock And Ball Torture (CDr), Fatso - Anthony Hobson - Just Whimsical (Vinyl, LP), Foot In The Door - New Street Adventure - No Hard Feelings (Vinyl, LP, Album), Turn To Dust - Persuader (2) - Evolution Purgatory (CD, Album)

That was a bit of a dumb record, but 'Hey Child' is great. He was on Diamond Records. I think that was Wes's label, wasn't it? They were all characters. S'POP: There seems to be some rivalry between the people that worked at and the people who worked over the road atthe Brill Building.

So you had your more sophisticated guys that were being allowed in that place of Tin Pan Alley. They could make the transition to show tunes, to their dumbing down rock'n'roll things that they did. But they had a good feel for that stuff anyway, they were pretty sophisticated guys. S'POP: So had the younger crowd over there? You had bunches of writers in all these places. A lot of them weren't doing very well. S'POP: And you were in your early twenties?

And it was great. I loved going in the morning. I had a life I really loved. I was a gambler at the time, and a good one, and I would study the horses at night, and make a decision on them. I used to live in Westchester with Joanie and the kids, when we got married, when I was 23 or I'd take a train in with the racing form, and pick my two bets to make for the day, and make my bets at around 10 o'clock in the morning, and then it would be music for the rest of the day.

I had bookies that would take my bets, and at the end of the day I would go pick up the paper to see how I did, and head back home. I was very good at it, so it was mostly very pleasant days. I was a little genius, for horse racing and any gambling, these were all fun things for me. I used to have bookies that would drop me all the time because they were small-time bookies and they couldn't take the pressure of it. When I had Meyer Lanski handling my action he didn't care because he was happy.

I found out later, that every time I would make a bet he would bet the same horses at the racetrack and bet ten times as much as I would. S'POP: Did people see you as a bit of a wonder kid with that. Did they think that some of the luck would rub off on them? I didn't want to share anything like that.

My focus to be good was always not to talk to anybody about anything, just to focus on my science of it, to study it. S'POP: That was just the horses? It didn't extend to the music?

I did write with the people you're mentioning. When I went to April Blackwood, I was taking a draw against my royalties. So if I made royalties, that money would all be deducted. Almost right away, within a few weeks of being signed, the boss came over and said, "Look, I've another idea for you. I'll pay you a little more than that, I'll call you Associate Professional Manager of the company, and your job will be: whenever there's somebody you think I should listen to, or somebody I should sign, you'll let me know.

Al and I had just met James and the boys. We'd met the boys first, we'd been doing a little movie. And one day he brought me up a reel-to-reel tape and I listened to it, and holy shit! I called up Al and said we've got to stop everything - we've got to work with this guy. So I brought James in and signed him to April Blackwood, who were paying the bills.

S'POP: He was signed as a writer? Al and I produced some things. I tried to convince this little record company - back in those days it was a singles record company, you didn't put albums out, until you got three hits - of a different way to do it with James. He had come to town and was playing at The Night Owl, we were in the studio working with him, and I had a meeting with the company. I said, "Why don't we put an album out with James? He doesn't have a typical radio voice - treat him like a jazz artist or a traditional folk artist.

Not necessarily go for a single, and have his records in the stores near where he plays. And try to develop two or three towns on the East Coast where we could do it? And that was a real big disappointment, to me and to Al and to James. I was just asking the parent company - Jubilee, Mickey Eichner and the crew - to do it differently with James, to let us make an album with him.

They would have let us cut as many things as we wanted to, but they wouldn't put it out as an album, because back in those days that wasn't the formula.

And I was telling them to break the formula - don't even think about a single, put the thing out, let it be a vibe thing, that people who go to his shows will want to buy it, that you sell it in Greenwich Village, you sell it where his shows are, you go to Washington, Boston. They thought it was a good idea for a minute, then they changed their mind.

At that point James was needing to go away for therapy. We were supposed to meet the next year, we picked a point where we would meet. Around that time I got a call from him - he was in England with the Beatles, who offered a deal - and he asked if he could break the contract with Al and me. He signed a deal with the Beatles - we worked it out with him. The deal that was supposed to be worked out was never really worked out - the lawyer from Apple Records didn't really do what he was supposed to do for Al and I.

Our contract was with James, and we didn't want to sue him, so we just let it go. She was a terrific singer, a very, very talented girl. I always liked Kathy. In my shyness - I was writing songs, I started to get together with Kathy, I hadn't played 'Angel Of The Morning' yet for Al and Evie [Sands], and I didn't know if they'd like it or not - I was shy about whether someone would like one of my songs or not.

She had rehearsed it with me and she sounded really good on it. And I always felt bad that the next day I had the meeting with Al and Evie, and I was ready to do it with Kathy, 'cos I was afraid they were going to say, "I'm not sure. I played it for them and they both went nuts for the song. So then I had to call Kathy and say, "We've got to do something else. She was on Rainy Day as well. This was before Rainy Day, about I don't remember even producing this.

She probably did a demo for me of this song and we made it into a recording. They were a bit of a dodgy Album), weren't they? S'POP: Where were they based? A lot of dodgy characters through that building! They would make some kind of deal with the record company, through the parent company that would pay the bills, and then they would make deals with their artists, and this was the Catch They would get a lot of money from the record company as an advance to making recordings, and the Kama Sutra [productions] would be distributed through another big company.

They'd pay a lot of money to them and they'd get big offices, big cars, big houses in the country, big everything. They'd get a couple of hundred thousand dollars, and then the artist would record and the biggest problem they could have is that the artist had a hit, and they'd have to pay them royalties.

They'd have no money - they'd already spent it on their cars, offices and everything, so they'd have to find a way not to pay them. The central premise: if it's a success, you're really in trouble. That's the way a lot of these production companies went. How did you find Evie?

I just knew of this young girl, years-old, every once in a while she'd walk into this dodgy building, Broadway, and head for the eighth floor mainly, Teddy Vann's office.

I used to see her. I didn't like the song she was singing, but I heard her voice - "Wow! This girl can sing! I said I'd like to get involved working with this girl. Then, Al Gorgoni said, "Somebody's put up some money for me to do some recordings with Evie.

So it really came through Al. To me, as a producer and a writer, you could not have asked for a better situation. She had this honey voice that was one of a kind. To me it was like the ultimate find, just to be working with Evie Sands. How could you ever not love that, every minute - working with her, rehearsing with her, producing her. She was a great girl and she loved the way I wrote, the things that Al and I did together. I think I was a little nervous to go over and see them, but we had done the skeleton of the record and were about ready to put the strings on.

We wanted to find an outlet and thought Blue Cat might be the place for us. So we went over and had a meeting with them, and got to know them, and they were great. And she started her career off as the biggest hard-luck girl in the music business. Her record was shipped, the test pressing was sent around to four or five different places. The record company was hugely excited about it.

In Chicago, Jackie Ross was coming off a big hit record on Chess Records, and they were at a session when somebody brought the test pressing of Evie's record in and said, "You've gotta hear this record.

They stopped the session and they cut the song. On that Wednesday, they took a full-page ad out, and our record wasn't coming out until the following week. I said, "What a bad break - somebody used the same title!

I said, "What the heck is that!? So we traced it. We found exactly what happened with the test pressing. And so George Goldner called up Leonard Chess and finally, as the Jackie Ross record was bulleting up the charts, they had it stopped. Where Evie's record was played, it was big, but you couldn't expect the station to stop playing Jackie Ross and play Evie's instead.

So Evie just lost the game. When we released her version it was the biggest record every place it was played - it was a number one request record. I think they had ten thousand copies, they were all sold in two weeks, and Evie was gonna head for a number one - and then the company went bankrupt. So, she was the hard-luck girl there. Merrilee Rush had the hit. Chips Moman and Tommy Cogbill cut the thing very much like Evie's record.

Those were tough things for Evie. She was Dusty Springfield's favourite singer. S'POP: She's been recording recently. We made one record with her ['Women In Prison']. I was just trying to fit her into what I was doing, the Americana thing. I wasn't really trying to do what was best for her, I had no idea how to exploit it. I think ever since that album Evie's been on the road.

Didn't she join some rock band? I hear she's doing something else. Through Ted, and somebody else, I got to know Billy and his band - they were playing around Westchester County and had a very good reputation. I heard some of the demos that they had done and, to tell you the truth, I was very jealous - this guy's got it!

He had a song called 'All My Love' that I felt was terrific. Billy was the real deal. I signed him to April Blackwood Music as a writer and tried to figure a way to do something and break with him.

I was driving down the highway to work one day - and I usually don't write like this - and I saw two little kids in the field, a black kid and a white kid, walking hand in hand across the field. By the time I hit the city I had this whole thing about 'Storybook Children' - you've got your world and I've got mine, and it's a shame two grown-up worlds can never be the same.

It was at the time that the race stuff was still fairly intense. I've got an idea for a song. I'm never good at getting exactly what someone is giving me, because I'm not sophisticated enough, but somewhere in there, within a few minutes, we had 'Storybook Children', and I asked Billy to help me finish it up. But it was almost finished by the time I got to the city.

So we went and recorded it. We were looking for a girl for it. We had a girl to sing it, but we weren't thinking she was the right girl. We brought her over to Jerry Wexler, and played it for him. I said, "I just need money to put strings on it, and find the right girl. He got us together with her and, basically, we made a deal with Atlantic Records for that. I've decided, I want to change the deal a little bit. We'll put the strings on it.

We're gonna get Judy Clay, we'll make a hit record. How simple can this deal be? S'POP: Another two points - would that have been a better thing or not? It's the same as 'The Producers' thing. You don't get the money, 'cos by the time you get the hit, you're into making an album, and then all the money you would have got is in the album. And then by the time you're ready to pay for the album, you're into making another album. So you never get the money. The only people who make the money are the songwriters, because they get paid, whether it's an advance or not, whether they paid for the strings or not.

For the most part those artists didn't get paid, and if somebody came in and complained - one of those artists on Atlantic Records, or the doo-wop groups - they'd say, "Oh, by the way, we got you a Cadillac. In some of the obituaries they mention her activity in getting restoration for black artists. One obit refers to Atlantic as "the house that Ruth built". CHIP TAYLOR: There was so much energy going on with those artists who didn't get paid, and so much good efforts for them to promote their own things, I think the companies should just wash those things.

If these things are selling again, then pay a little bit of royalties to them. That's the one we did first. We brought it to Jerry Wexler with Nona on it, but we weren't sure it should be Nona. We weren't convinced we had the right girl. Jerry said right away, "We've got to find somebody better. S'POP: It really took off, that record. It was a funny thing, we had two singles with them - Billy and Judy - and they were the first inter-racial couple, and the first to play the Apollo Theater.

It was a song that Ted Daryll and I wrote and it sounded like a really good thing for them. I didn't think about hits back then. I thought about it after the fact, not to sit down to write a hit. S'POP: So you never wrote with particular singers in mind? So I wrote that thinking about her.

Most of the time I asked my company not to ask me questions like that, or not point me in those directions, but I must say that whenever they did Without You In My Life - Christopher Holland* - Brother Sun Sister Moon (CD made me feel good.

S'POP: What strikes me about your songs is most of them are by female performers. You seem really good at writing songs for female performers. Not many writers can do that. You're always writing for girls, from a girl's point of view? Don't you have a man's point of view?

I put words in their mouths, and say, "OK, I like to hear that. I wish you could play these, I'd have some fun listening to 'em. Then one night Jerry said, "Can you turn 'Try' into Without You In My Life - Christopher Holland* - Brother Sun Sister Moon (CD up-tempo song? I need it for Lorraine Ellison. That morning - my bookie for some reason was out of town - I'd planned on going out to the racetrack to bet a horse, and it was a very important bet to me.

I said, "I don't know if I can do it. What time are you going to be in the office? This song is a story in itself, a total chapter. I took the groove of 'On My Word', and I started force-feeding lines from 'Try' into it, until it took its own shape. Then 'On My Word' was out the window, and 'Try' was there. I wrote it out a little bit more in the morning, wrote out the words, got in the car, walked down to Jerry's office and I played it for him.

He liked it. He put his tape recorder on, wrote some notes down, banged on the piano - I had that little horn section in it that I wrote for it. He said, "Great! Then I heard that Lorraine had cut it, but I didn't even hear her version of it, because I was on to something else - some other horses, some other music.

We'll have to do this in part one and part two, yeah? We have a show tonight in Buckingham. We're supposed to all meet down here in the lobby at 12, and it's after 12 now.

Three more shows, then we're off to Europe. Set part two up with Florence for when I'm back in town, or we can do it over the phone. Boys, I'm headin'. S'POP: Yes. It sounds so Taylor-written for her. I got this little groove with it and my friend Ted Daryll and I worked on it together. I liked the little groove, a cool little groove.

I didn't know what we were going to do with the thing. It was like "I'm a one-eyed cat, sneaking round the corner, trying to get to you. One of the guys in the office made the decision to play it for her. I didn't. S'POP: Well, it was a good idea, because it turned out a really great record.

It had a wonderful professional staff that truly loved the music that was coming in and really worked hard to find artists for the songs. And David Rosner was the guy that was the real hero of that company. He was just wonderful, so passionate in everything.

They did great. They got ideas right away for my songs and they were excited about them. You couldn't ask for better surroundings. S'POP: You were responsible for finding and signing other writers too?

Right away, I brought in Al Gorgoni, who was my partner at the time. I wanted to write with him a little bit, so I brought him into the company. And I brought Billy Vera into the company. I always liked Billy. I was always jealous of Billy. I thought he wrote some cool things that I couldn't write. I was jealous of one particular song of his, but I can't remember what it was. And then I brought James Taylor in. That was the big thing.

You can't imagine how much glad I am to have this. A tough call, that one! She had a great version of it. Walter Jackson used to perform on crutches. He was truly one of the great soul singers of that generation.

He wasn't like a performing soul singer, he felt this stuff. He would reach the masses in the way he performed. Garnett Mimms was great, but he was more over the top. Walter had a certain sadness to his whole way of singing that was wonderful.

S'POP: Fangette told us that when she first met Walter he had a residency at some jazz club or something? I didn't meet him. S'POP: You didn't meet him? I was kind of behind the scenes at most times. I wasn't hanging out in the music business. I was married to Joanie and, having the kids, I wasn't so typically in the business running around.

I would just go in, write my songs and come back. S'POP: You were a nine to five-er? So it was a double job I had, just like you guys! But right now, this is an amazing time for me. I think back to the time, there was so much energy floating around in those days. We were taking over the business. But now, the way we're on tour, and what we're doing with John [Platania] and Kendel [Carson], there's new energy going on around here. We don't know where it's taking us, but with that band, there's wonderful stuff around.

I never knew Chip with Flying Machine. Sometimes, people say that I was, but I never worked with James Taylor in my life.

I don't know how that connection came about. Cream - Tales Of Brave Ulysses Jimi Hendrix Experience - If 6 Was 9 Quicksilver Messenger Service - Calvary Serge Gainsbourg - Cargo Culte Pink Floyd - Atom Heart Mother Album) Eno - Driving Me Backwards King Crimson - 21st Century Schizoid Man Vanilla Fudge - Some velvet morning Gentle Giant - Allucard Soft Machine - Moon In June Cressida - Asylum Can - Mushroom Gong - Oily Way Track Listings Irish Jig An Dro-Nevez Sopo Song Flop-Eared-Mule Planxty-Birke Bourree Auvergnate Deu Tu Ganeme Me Meus Bet Plijadur Jackson Morning Patrick's Day Pretty-Brown-Maid Texas-Quistep Without You In My Life - Christopher Holland* - Brother Sun Sister Moon (CD Bourree Saintongeoise From the first moment it is possible to be appreciated that this group counts on a great multiplicity of influences, from the Irish folk music to the rock happening through the jazz and classic music.

The first three are classic Gaa, similar to the Uranus material, though with better fidelity, less rough around the edges.

The track "Morgendammerung," an instrumental, even stretches further out from Gaa's rock trappings. It starts with a ticking noise and slowly building keyboard tones, moves to a jazzier middle section, and then getts even more funky with a rolling bass riff and odd percussion noises. Needless to say, these tracks pail compared to the stuff. An absolute must for any fan of instrumental rock n' roll. Part1 Part2.

Dark Cellars - - Heavy Syrup Dark Cellars - - Heavy Syrup The Dark Cellars were formed in June of near a graveyard for the mentally insane at positively 13 o'clock actually it was Newtonville, but doesn't matter now. Aram Heller owner of Stanton Park recs and member of Hopelessly Obscure is on guitar and keyboards in these recordings, and Bryn Carlson who played with almost every Boston band in the 80s is on drums.

This LP, released in on Alien Cactus Records ACR THORN comes from the deepest six-o psyche and includes some real killers, as the instrumental Revolution 2, which, if doesn't get you on your feet, there's a strong possibillity that you're dead. This is a curious LP, indeed. Collecting tracks recording from toyit constantly changes mood and direction, from garage to pop to psych and back again. The engaging "Everybody's Girl" kicks things off with a foot tapping garage melody; this is the type of fun song that'll show up on the future compilations explaining what 80's garage thing was all about.

The love of 13th Floor Elevator-styled dementia is inherent, and the lads even throw in a five-an-half minute version of "Roller Coaster" to drive the point home. I especially like the bands imitation The Evevators' "electric jug" sound - this time it's the vocalist making squeaking noises into a microphone! New England had some fine garage outfits, and some of them weren't afraid to delve into the guitar-driven world of psychedelia as well.

Hats off to the Dark Cellars for giving us a dose of both. Timothy Gassen-Knights of Fuzz. An excellent neo acid — psych — space band. They have obviously discovered magic mushrooms and want to take you on a sprawling psychedelic voyage filled with trippy late '60's psych and early 70's space rock.

This could be the best German release since the 70's!! Recorded in Dolby Surround so anyone with a home cinema set up can really blow their minds open. From Aural Innovations 8 October This LP is a numbered edition of copies on gram vinyl with a patchouli scented label! It is also released on CD and recorded in Dolby Surround sound. This is the 3rd full length album by this German band whose roots are mainly in the 60's sound the way they use the organ but a lot of the music is full on spacerock with lots of trippy sounds and floating songs.

Pink Floyd is also a big influence on this band. The basic song has loads of spaced and fuzzed out guitar and synths that flow in and out over the piano riff. The vocalist is not that great but does not play that big of a role in the band's sound. This song also features some nice saxophone. This song is excellent and starts slowly with guitar and synth sweeps, but soon the freaky organ and vocals roll on it, while a windy background and some backwards guitar fill the landscape.

A very dynamic and cool song. This song must be really excellent in the surround sound! The album closes with "Magic Rushroam". As you hear cars driving by, the space sounds and guitar slowly roll in and take over and the one line of lyrics is spoken, "Enchanted by the magic cap of wisdom and fun, that fits on your head.

Every ordinary place turns to a marvelous space. Pretty cool record. Discover this excellent band and album. Lots of great bands in, like Byrds, Country Weather and much, much more. Your links Riddles and Fairytales T. Camp - Bob Cooke - All Kinds of Highs T. Satisfaction Mick Jagger - Keith Richards - Paradox City T.

Camp - Bob Cooke - side 2 The House of the Rising Sun arranged by T. Images Shadow In the Night T. Psychedelic as hell, twisted, anguished, goes from libidinous inferno to naive ballad. Full of trippy feedback washed-out songs as well as the usual Betsy pop ballad, this album is a must for anyone looking for underappreciated women in music whose music can make you want to slam your head through a steel door one second and then make you cry the next.

Produced by David Roback! Lead guitarist Phil Polimeni embraced a warm but fuzzy sound that suggests the influence of Jimi Hendrix and Pete Townsend without the aggressive histrionics of either artist, and vocalist Mike Garrigan was a more than capable blue-eyed soul singer with an admirable sense of restraint on moodier numbers such as "We Gotta Live On" and "Wednesday Morning Dew. The performances here sound warm and organic, and sway with an easy but impassioned groove, while Garrigan, bassist Gus Riozzi, and rhythm guitarist Tommy Nikosey deliver impressive harmonies.

While the minute medley of "Down by the River" and "For What It's Worth" goes on a bit too long and doesn't bear comparison to the originals, Polimeni's guitar work holds it own and the band is able to bring its own personality to the tunes, no small thing.

It's probably a mistake to regard Majic Ship as a lost classic from the era when psychedelia was giving way to hard rock, but it's a solid and enjoyable record from a band who had genuine talent and some fine songs; it's not hard to imagine these guys could have become major stars if their luck had been a bit better back in the day.

They kept a busy performance schedule throughout the next few years when their high school commitments allowed it. InRifice left the band to attend college, but at about the same time, former '50s crooner turned manager Johnny Mann saw the band live and promised to get them a recording contract. Mann introduced the band to the Tokens, who produced their first single, "Night Time Music. Majic Ship melded hard rock, pop, and psychedelia in a way similar to fellow New Yorkers Vanilla Fudge.

The band continued on for the next couple of years with plans to record a second album, but those plans were nixed when the band's shared house in Staten Island burned to the ground intaking with it virtually all their recording equipment and instruments. Without any insurance, the band members called it quits. Cookin' Mama - - New Day Yes i know the picture is terrible but Strangely Strange - - Kip of the Serenes Dr.

Strangely Strange - - Kip of the Serenes. Dim and Dr. Soon they teamed with multi-instrumentalist Tim Gouldingan aspiring painter, and began living and rehearsing in a house owned by Goulding's girlfriend, backing vocalist Orphan Annie a. Annie Xmaswhich its tenants nicknamed "The Orphanage.

Strangely Strange debuted in with Kip of the Serenes. After 's Heavy PettingDr. Strangely Strange began falling apart: Goulding left to enter to a Buddhist monastery, while Pawle and Booth teamed with Gay and Terry Woods for a brief tour. The group soon disbanded, but they reunited in for an Irish tour, and briefly reconvened again in the early s, Eventually Booth established a second Orphanage which became a springboard for a new generation of Irish rock, helping launch the careers of Thin Lizzy 's Phil LynottGary Moore and others.

Tracklist 1. Another Normal Day 2. Freeway 3. A Friend Like You 4. Left Hand Of Moses 5. No Love Lost 6. She's An Easy Rider 7. Amusement Park 8. Back On The Road Again 9. Canary Island Rain Highily recommended. NB: 1 reissued on CD Mystic 7 and again The band were previously known as Sunlights Seven and recorded an unreleased, acetate-only album in Hollywood: Sunstroke, circa Their repertoire largely comprised of early versions of songs re-recorded for the Creation Of Sunlight album.

You can find their first Coloured Heaven, in Twilightzonewith a semi-negative review by R. In a perfect world, you and your soulmate would bump into each other on the streets of Germany, lock eyes, and fall madly in love the next second. Dating Profile. Is online dating easier for single female expats in Germany than for their male counterparts? Dating Tips. Register Login Language: English en. Register to contact people from your country living in Germany just like you!

Dating site for Expats in Germany Finding love is a challenging quest even in your home country. Online dating guide for expats Living in Germany is an incredible opportunity to rediscover and reinvent yourself, including the romantic side of your life.

Bang To The Rhythm - Various - The Best Of Julianas Tokyo 1993 (CD), Fernandel - Le Retour De Don Camillo (Vinyl, LP), Lay All Your Love On Me - ABBA - Gold (Greatest Hits) (CD), Everything Happens To Me - Charlie Parker - Bird With Strings (Live At The Apollo, Carnegie Hall &am, Ring Ring, The Way You Look Tonight - Art Pepper - The Complete Galaxy Recordings (CD), Mutant Ape - Power Blood Clot (CDr), Out Of Nowhere - Vic Damone - Closer Than A Kiss / This Game Of Love (CD), Aint Nothing Like The Real Thing - Marcella Detroit - Jewel (CD, Album), Arrival - Archie Shepp / Horace Parlan Duo* - En Concert: 1rst Set (Vinyl, LP, Album), Bruyaa & Ozonic - Masterpiece (Vinyl)

8 thoughts on “Without You In My Life - Christopher Holland* - Brother Sun Sister Moon (CD, Album)

  1. Christopher Holland – Brother Sun Sister Moon () Drums and percussion on all tracks from the album. Back to Discography. 0. Contact. [email protected] Endorsements. Gretsch Drums. Zildjian Cymbals. Remo Heads. Vic Firth Sticks. Twitter Couldn't connect with Twitter.

  2. Mar 16,  · View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of "Brother Sun, Sister Moon" on Discogs.

  3. The title track, Brother Sun Sister Moon by Donovan rang through my head, and became frequently vocalized after watching this movie with my Honey, me for the 2nd time, her first. I don't know exactly how historically accurate the film depicting the life of St Francis was, but it was deeply moving and beautiful to watch.

  4. I am pleased to release this CD and digital of my songs from the film BROTHER SUN SISTER MOON, the story of ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI, directed by the great director FRANCO ZEFFIRELLI. Some of these songs were not in the film and I include them here. Donovan THIS ALBUM IS AVAILABLE IN THE FOLLOWING FORMATS: CD / 20€ (SHIPPING INCLUDED).

  5. Biography by John Bush. + Follow Artist. Former Information Society producer Paul Robb and Twin/Tone solo act Barbara Cohen united in to form the trip-hop duo Brother Sun Sister Moon. The group's smoky debut album flaunted Cohen's seductive. Read Full Biography.

  6. blueskyservices.biz is a huge collection of song lyrics, album information and featured video clips for a seemingly endless array of artists — collaboratively assembled by our large music community and contributing editors. Browse our lyrics and artists database alphabetically or use our advanced query capabilites to search by keywords.

  7. Franco Zeffirelli’s “Brother Sun, Sister Moon” is a big, limp Valentine of a movie, filled with an excess of sweetness and light. What a shame. His subject is Francis of Assisi, one of the most interesting and natural of saints, but Zeffirelli has portrayed him as sort of the first flower child.

  8. Let's talk about the film Brother Sun, Sister Moon, a biographical movie on St. Francis of Assisi directed by Franco Zeffirreli, the Italian homosexual director who would later go on to win fame with Jesus of blueskyservices.biz is one of those movies you either love or you hate. When I was a new Catholic, coming to the firm solidity of the ancient Faith from the troubled waters of the world, I.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *